activism

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Critical Art Ensemble (CAE) is a collective of five tactical media practitioners of various specializations including computer graphics and web design, film/video, photography, text art, book art, and performance.

Formed in 1987, CAE's focus has been on the exploration of the intersections between art, critical theory, technology, and political activism. The group has exhibited and performed at diverse venues internationally, ranging from the street, to the museum, to the internet. Museum exhibitions include the Whitney Museum and The New Museum in NYC; The Corcoran Museum in Washington D.C.; The ICA, London; The MCA, Chicago; Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; and The London Museum of Natural History.

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The Surveillance Camera Players (SCP) is a small, informal group of people who are unconditionally opposed to the installation and use of video surveillance cameras in public places. The SCP was formed in New York City in November 1996 by two groups of friends/activists: one centered around Michael Carter, the author of the manifesto for The Guerrilla Preprogramming of Video Surveillance Equipment (1995), and the other around Bill Brown, fresh from the Unabomber for President campaign (1996). Both share a strong interest in the theories and actions of the Situationist International, especially its use of scandals, pranks and "detournement" (diverting bland or oppressive materials for subversive purposes).

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Stephanie Rothenberg & Jeff Crouse - Invisible Threads

Stephanie Rothenberg & Jeff Crouse - Invisible Threads

Upgrade! NY continues its series on open source as it relates to activism and creative practice.

Within activist and creative practice there is a range of models for mobilizing the labor and creativity of the crowd (aka “crowdsourcing”). Both practices experiment with a spectrum of autonomy and control within those models. From distributed design to distributed fundraising, MoveOn to Mechanical Turk, a crowdsourcer issues a call and creates structure for participation.

 

What do we mean by ‘freedom’? Should Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) necessarily be powered by radical politics of ownership and collaboration? Or is the latching of “Free Software” ideological baggage limiting the full transformative power of “Open Source”. How are these questions informed by licenses? Are some licenses more open than others? More ethical than others? This emotional debate has been in the heart of FLOSS from its early days and has created camps and animosities within the community.

Upgrade! NY continues its program series on open source as it relates to activism and creative practice. Join us for a discussion and debate on what constitutes freedom within the Open Source and Free Culture movements. We will examine the strong ideological differences through a provocative panel discussion with Gabriella Coleman and Zachary Lieberman.

 
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ShiftSpace

While the Internet's design is widely understood to be open and distributed, control over how users interact online has given us largely centralized and closed systems. The web is undergoing a transformation whose promise is user empowerment—but who controls the terms of this new read/write web? The web has followed the physical movement of the city's social center from the (public) town square to the (private) mall. ShiftSpace attempts to subvert this trend by providing a new public space on the web.

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Project Created: 
May 2006
 
People: Mushon Zer-Aviv, Justin Blinder, Joe Moore, Florica Vlad, Doron Ben-Avraham, David Nolen, Dan Phiffer, Clint Newsome, Avital Oliver
Research: Open Culture
Project Type: Activism, Hacking, Open Source, Software, Web
Tags: web, plugin, parasitic, javascript, hacking, firefox, design, code, activism


Summer School @ NightA series of free evening lectures open to the public led by hosts from Eyebeam’s Summer School program and friends of Eyebeam. Thurs., July 16, 2009Public Practice: Activists and Vanguards A rousing debate (with declaimed manifestos) from artists Hans Bernhard (Ubermorgen.com), Patrick Lichty, Steve Lambert, Stephen Duncombe, plus other participants from the College of Tactical Culture. Moderated by Eyebeam curatorial partner Sarah Cook (CRUMB).

 


Summer School @ NightA series of free evening lectures open to the public led by hosts from Eyebeam's Summer School program and friends of Eyebeam. Thurs., July 9, 2009Copyright and the Creator: Who Cares What's Fair? A discussion on fair use and appropriation within activist and creative practice moderated by Creative Commons product manager and Eyebeam research associate Fred Benenson; with Eyebeam resident Jon Cohrs, artist/activist Larry Bogad, audio-visual remix artist Jonny Wilson (Eclectic Method), and Postmasters gallery director Magdalena Sawon.

 


Summer School @ NightA series of free evening lectures open to the public led by hosts from Eyebeam’s Summer School program and friends of Eyebeam. Thurs., July 2, 2009A mind shredding evening with the College of Tactical Culture, hosted by Eyebeam senior fellow Steve Lambert and Eyebeam research associate Stephen Duncombe. Lambert and Duncombe discussed tools and techniques in creative activism and the work happening at their new College.

 

Patrick Lichty's "Homily to Kennedy", given at Summer School @ Night at Eyebeam NYC, July 16, 2009, is online at the Furtherfield Blog - shared space for personal reflection on media art practice. http://blog.furtherfield.org/?q=node/286

 
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