arambartholl

by Matthew Zuras on November 1, 2010 at 11:15 AM

As part of his residency at Eyebeam, Aram Bartholl sealed five USB flash drives into the walls of several New York City buildings, such as the New Museum, Eyebeam and the Union Square subway station, allowing anyone with a laptop to plug in and share whatever they want. "'Dead Drops' is an anonymous, offline, peer-to-peer file-sharing network in public space," writes Bartholl on his site.

We can't imagine that they'll last too long, though, before getting filled up with illicit porn, indie band demo albums and terrible poetry. Check out the full list of the drives' locations at Bartholl's site.

 

What would you do if you saw a USB head sticking out of a wall? Dead Drops is a new offline peer-to-peer file sharing project by Aram Bartholl. Anonymous users can find the USB flashdrives in public spaces (5 so far in NYC) and download and share files. Take that Limewire!

 

As a part of his EYEBEAM residency, Aram Bartholl wanted to create a peer to peer file-sharing network in public space. And what better way to do that than embed USB flash drives into brick walls? The project, "Dead Drops," consists of five offline, anonymous drives where people can plug in their laptops to upload or drop any files they like.

 

You might know Aram Bartholl as the man who came up with CAPTCHA business cards. Bartholl is making waves once more with yet another clever and still geeky work of art. Bartholl calls it Dead Drops, and the idea is simple – he embedded five flash drives into walls or curbs around New York so people can anonymously share files with each other.

 
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