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IIE, Interactive Infrasonic Installation, Reinhard Gupfinger, interactive_infrasonic_environment.jpg
IIE is an interactive acoustic installation through which Reinhard Gupfinger researches infrasounds, that is, those sounds that, having a frequency less than 20/16 Hertz (20/16 cycles per second), are below the audible threshold of the human ear. While the ear is insensitive to those sounds, the human body can nevertheless perceive
them as vibrations. It is this possibility that the Austrian artist explores in this work, raising awareness of this relatively unknown curiosity. In fact, infrasounds are extremely common in nature, since they are emitted by atmospheric phenomena, such as thunder and wind, and by some animals (whales, elephants, etc.), which use them to communicate over distances.

 
Tags: art, music, sound
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As if streets didn't have enough pandemonium, Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki has created a White Noise Machine. He put it in a street in Delhi, India, and this is what happened.

 

I just returned from Bangalore, India as part of the WikiWars Conference (see previous post). Organized by Nishant Shah and Geert Lovnik as part 1 of CPOV: Critical Point of View (as opposed to Wikipedia’s NPOV), the conference featured speakers from 27 different countries.

wikiwars

 

Fashion Designer, Diana Eng (Project Runway), who combines science and technology in her work is partnering with the Treasure Academy to explore Fairytale Fashion concepts.

 
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Jörg M. Colberg, an accomplished astrophysicist and photographer, created a series of images entitled "American Pixels" in which he applied a self-made compression algorithm to photographs, turning them into artworks of the digital age.

But Colberg's works aren't just commentaries on the state of images in an age of lossy file types. He designed his own compression algorithm that responds uniquely to the contents of each photograph.

For Colberg, the compression becomes part of the creative progress. He explains:

A computer that creates a jpeg does not know anything about the contents of the image: It does what it is told, in a uniform manner across the image.

 
The Red Squirrel of Britain (Sciurus vulgaris)

The Red Squirrel of Britain (Sciurus vulgaris)

Here are one-sheet descriptions of the proposals I made for Northumberland, that came out of my research residency in June 2009 at ISIS Arts in Newcastle.

There are three proposals:  a street food cart serving invasive species; a garden feeder in human form; and an animated diptych. In addition, I have proposed a banquet of edible invasive species set on the high moors, pleine aire, in reformation style.

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Animation test clips:

 

I am flying to Bangalore (Bengaluru) tonight. Here, I will be presenting an academic paper at WikiWars Conference with my colleague and close friend, Nathaniel Stern.

air_india_3

 


Interesting review of Steve Goodman’s book on sonic weapons by Geeta Dayal. The book is a very thorough look at history and implications of sonic weapons. Read the review here.

Steve Goodman, Toby Hayes, and I will be working on some projects around this subject over the next year. I’m hoping to spend sometime reverse engineering a LRAD speaker system used in crowd control.

 


Interesting review of Steve Goodman’s book on sonic weapons by Geeta Dayal. The book is a very thorough look at history and implications of sonic weapons. Read the review here.

Steve Goodman, Toby Hayes, and I will be working on some projects around this subject over the next year. I’m hoping to spend sometime reverse engineering a LRAD speaker system used in crowd control.

 

Window Farms started with a mere $5,000 as an art project initiated by Britta Riley and Rebecca Bray in February, 2009 through an artist’s residency at Eyebeam Art and Technology Center in New York and sponsorship by Submersible Design, Riley and Bray’s interactive design firm.

 
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