art

I’m looking for some beta-testers for “Playing Duchamp” — a new net art project.
login_duchamp

Working with 72 recorded games of Marcel Duchamp’s chess matches, I have created a computer program to play chess as if it were Duchamp. In a series of open challenges, I invite all artists, both skilled and unskilled at this classic game, to play against a Duchampian ghost.

You don’t need to know how to play chess well to try this out.

The official release for the project will be on November 30th. Stay tuned.

If interested, please email me at: lucky (at) kildall (dot) com

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

It’s a little short notice, but if anyone fancies taking part in a fascinating parapsychological art experiment this weekend, look no further:

VIGIL

Royal Academy Schools, 1-2 October 2010

Researching a series of unexplained incidents at this historic building, artist Blue Firth uncovered a first-hand account of apparent poltergeist activity in the artists’ studios.

 

Leonor Caraballo adorns a pennant symbolizing her breast cancer tumor.Artists have long been inspired by stand-out events in their lives. From traumas to creative exhilaration, inspiration comes in many forms.

Caraballo-Farman, a two-person team made up of Leonor Caraballo and Abou Farman, have been collaborating on various art and filmmaking projects for three years. Serving a artist residency at Eyebeam, the leading not-for-profit art and technology center in the United States, the team’s most recent project demonstrates the array of unique 3D printing applications through the visualization of breast cancer tumors.
For Caraballo-Farman, a grim diagnosis became an inspiring project. Diagnosed with Stage I Invasive Lobular Carcinoma, Caraballo also tested positive for the genetic mutation known as BRCA2. Always fascinated by medical imaging technologies –

 

[Aram Bartholl] is building his own filesharing network that screws those fat cats who want to control your freedom. He’s added file cache devices throughout NYC (five so far but more to come) that are anonymous and free to use. Upload what you want, download what you want. They’re completely offline which means monitoring who’s doing what gets a lot harder and quite possibly requires a warrant from a Judge (we’re obviously not legal experts, your mileage may vary).

As for the slew of comments that are sure to point out the dangers of malicious USB device; We think everyone knows they’re taking on some risk when connecting to a USB plug protruding from a brick wall.

 

Have you ever had the urge to randomly dump a massive amount of files in a public location so that any passerby could share in the fun? Yeah, I didn’t think so. But a new EYEBEAM project being conducted by NYC resident Aram Bartholl is pretty cool. He’s essentially running around downtown New York and installing flash drives, called “Dead Drops” into anything and everything — walls, curbs, posts, etc. The idea is that people are to share random files with one another, offline and on the go.

The concept is pretty cool to think about. Though I’m not too sure just strolling up to some random flash drive jutting out of the wall and then hooking it into my computer is the safest thing to do. Nevertheless, it’s a cool social/tech concept. Any NYC residents run into any of these “Dead Drops” yet?

Step inside for a few shots of what these Dead Drop stations look like…

 

As part of his EYEBEAM residency Aram Bartholl has been installing USB flash drive “Dead Drops” around NYC to encourage people to anonymously share files offline in public spaces. Here’s more info and photos of the project.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam



Arrangements, 2004

From the Press Release:

SATURDAY, OCTOBER, 16th 14:00 [class will start at 15:00]

Location: Tschaikowskistraße 51, 13156 Berlin, Germany

 

Innovation: how to delete corporate logos from view

* 16:02 22 October 2010 by MacGregor Campbell

Innovation is our regular column in which we highlight emerging technologies and predict where they may lead

Call it advertisement hacking. Technology-inspired artists have designed ways for you to mask or perhaps even delete company logos in your field of view as you wander around a city or shopping centre.

The trend subverts a technology called augmented reality (AR)Movie Camera, by which virtual information – say restaurant ratings – is overlain on the real world as you peer through smart glasses or a smartphone camera.

New York artist Jeff Crouse has designed a program called Unlogo, which detects corporate logos in a video stream, then replaces them.

 

Last Thursday, I exhibited After Thought, a performance-installation that I developed while at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center at Art in Odd Places in New York (check out their AIOP website, there’s some great projects there).

As the name implies, these performances that happen in unusual spots in the city, this one being at the 14th Street Y.

14_y_entrance

 
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