biorhythm

For a song to be catchy, it doesn't necessarily need to be enjoyable. If you've ever lay awake at night with It's A Small World or Macarena keeping you up, you understand the paradox. In fact, part of what makes a song catchy is purely biological, as we learn from one piece in Biorhythm: Music and the Body, showing through August 6 at Eyebeam Art And Technology Center in New York City.

 

Why does a beat get legs tapping? How does a body translate the feel of sound? “Bio-Rhythm: Music and the Body” is designed to offer some answers to those and other audio-related conundrums.
The exhibit comes by way of the Science Gallery in Dublin, Ireland. It's now made its way to the Eyebeam Gallery in the Big Apple for the World Science Festival.

 
Tags: biorhythm

Music and the Body | Video | Reuters.com

 

One of those exhibitions was called Biorhythms: Music and the Body, and was seen by more than 60,000 people in Dublin last summer.

It explores why our bodies react differently to hearing Lady Gaga and Beethoven.

Now, it has opened at the Eyebeam Art and Technology Centre in Chelsea, Manhattan as part of the World Science Festival.

It's the first time that the Science Gallery has taken an exhibition overseas, and also the first time that the World Science Festival has ever invited an exhibition to participate in its program.

 

One of those exhibitions was called Biorhythms: Music and the Body, and was seen by more than 60,000 people in Dublin last summer.

It explores why our bodies react differently to hearing Lady Gaga and Beethoven.

Now, it has opened at the Eyebeam Art and Technology Centre in Chelsea, Manhattan as part of the World Science Festival.

It's the first time that the Science Gallery has taken an exhibition overseas, and also the first time that the World Science Festival has ever invited an exhibition to participate in its program.

 

One of those exhibitions was called Biorhythms: Music and the Body, and was seen by more than 60,000 people in Dublin last summer.

It explores why our bodies react differently to hearing Lady Gaga and Beethoven.

Now, it has opened at the Eyebeam Art and Technology Centre in Chelsea, Manhattan as part of the World Science Festival.

It's the first time that the Science Gallery has taken an exhibition overseas, and also the first time that the World Science Festival has ever invited an exhibition to participate in its program.

 
Tags: abc, biorhythm

Join the Reality Inspectors in this workshop where they will discuss their "BIORHYTHM" project Theramin Inspector V2, an interactive exhibit which visualises the electromagnetic energy around you as you play a theramin. Following this discussion, The Reality Inspectors will guide participants through a design process using legos to create a hands on visualization of real data from the workshop space.

This event is presented as part of the "BIORHYTHM" exhibition at Eyebeam and has been organized as part of and in cooperation with the 2011 World Science Festival.

 

If you've ever wondered why you find yourself tearing up when you hear a song like Gary Jules' "Mad World," this exhibit might give you some insight. Created by Science Gallery and presented by Eyebeam in conjunction with the World Science Festival, Biorhythm explores the ways our bodies and brains react to music — there may actually be a methodology to producing a hit song. Works in the show include Kaffe Matthews' Sonic Bed, Klangkapsel, Something for the Girl Who Has Everything, and Heart 'N Beat. Opening weekend is highlighted by a reception and workshops with the exhibiting artists.

 

New York’s World Science Festival hit a high note with its BIORHYTHM: Music and the Body showcase Friday evening at the Eyebeam Art + Technology Center.

The showcase featured exhibits all relating to music and the body in unique ways. People of all ages walked through the displays, all of which showed how the music correlates with the body’s reactions.

 

If ever there were an interactive art/science show, BioRhythm: Music and the Body is it. The exhibition, which debuted in Dublin’s Science Gallery last year, has traveled to the Big Apple as part of the 2011 World Science Festival, which runs through June 5th. Visitors to the Eyebeam art gallery in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood will be treated to a cacophony of sound and sensation in the building’s yawning main space. And they’ll quickly discover that they’re as much a part of the show as the artwork.

 
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