BIORHYTHM: music and the body

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David Handford has been producing sonic work since 1992. From psychedelia with Vibe Tribe and electronica with Moduloss, he now produces various forms of leftfield music as DJ Methodist and Ministry of Defiance on his label Postofficerecords, as well as film and performance soundtracks under his own name. His hand built electronic sound devices and music have been commissioned for art projects Escrapology, and Ointment as well as performances by movement artist Jo Shapland throughout Britain and Eire.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SExhibiting Artist
 
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Satoshi Morita is a Japanese sound artist currently living in Berlin. He holds a graduation in Sound Studies by the Arts University of Berlin. He has been presenting his many sound installations in galleries, museums and unconventional spaces throughout Austria, England and several places in Germany. Satoshi Morita also creates radio pieces that have been broadcasted in several radio art programs (WDR3, Deutchlandradio Kultur, etc.). He was granted an honorary mention at Prix Ars Electronica 2008.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SExhibiting Artist
 
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by Miyako Narita (2010)

Kaffe Matthews was born in Essex, England and lives and works in London. Since 1990 she has been making and performing new electro-acoustic music worldwide with a variety of things and places such as violin, theremin, Scottish weather, desert stretched wires, NASA scientists, melting ice in Quebec and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra. Currently she is researching 3D composition for outdoor enjoyment through Hammerhead sharks in Galapagos and sustainable vibratory interface design with ‘music for bodies’. Acknowledged as a pioneer in the field of electronic improvisation and live composition, Kaffe has released 6 solo CD’s on the label Annette Works.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SExhibiting Artist
 

Papermen are exhibiting Binaural Head as part of BIORHYTHM: MUSIC AND THE BODY.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SExhibiting Artist
 

Your perfect weekend: Friday
June 2, 2011
.....

“BioRhythm: Music and the Body”
At this exhibition (part of the weekend-long World Science Festival), which opens tonight with a reception, audiophiles can learn about what makes a minor chord sad and how different genres of music trigger different emotions. Through a variety of interactive installations, cognitive scientists explain the process behind writing a perfect hit song and dissect how those catchy pop hooks implant themselves into our minds—sometimes for what feels like an eternity. Eyebeam Art + Technology Center, 540 W 21st St between Tenth and Eleventh Aves (212-937-6580, worldsciencefestival.com). Fri 3 at 6pm; World Science Festival through Mon 6. Free.

 

Alex Hornbake of The Reality Inspectors assembly a Moog theremin kit at EYEBEAM in NYC.

posted by Sean McDonald

 
People: Theramin Inspectors
Tags: biorhythm, BIORHYTHM: music and the body

Event Alert: “BIORHYTHM: Music and the Body,” Opens June 2 at Eyebeam Art + Tech Center

May 27, 2011 by David Weiss

The new exhibition, BIORHYTHM: MUSIC AND THE BODY, will open June 2 at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in Chelsea. At this, the world’s largest research experiment on music and emotion, you may get fresh insights on the music that you love, and help the scientific community gather valuable information at the same time.

Plug your brain into BIORYTHM in NYC, beginning June 2.

The good people from BIORYTHM explain it all thusly:

 
Start Date: 
28 Jun 2011
Hours: 
6-8:30PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Join artist Andrew Demirjian for a workshop where participants will design their own distinctive tones for sonifying the stock price fluctuations of the three largest music companies. Participants will audition and perform each other's work working from Andrew's audiovisual installation, The Week in Review, presented in Eyebeam's Project Space (June 21-July 9). The control interface for Week in Review is a custom built LED clock interface and turntable, which enables a user play through a week of stock price data.  This is a workshop for Max/MSP and/or Ableton Live users.

RSVP here

This workshop is presented as related programming for Andrew Demirjian's Eyebeam Project Space exhibition, The Week in Review

 
Start Date: 
9 Jun 2011
Hours: 
6 pm - 8 pm
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Renowned Deleuzian scholar and philosopher of technology Manuel DeLanda discusses his new book Philosophy and Simulation: The Emergence of Synthetic Reason (Continuum, 2011), a philosophical overview of the rapidly growing field of computer simulations. Simulations have become as important as mathematical models in theoretical science. As computer power and memory have become cheaper they have migrated to the desktop where they now take the place of small-scale experiments. A philosophical examination of the epistemology of simulations is needed to understand their new role, underlining the consequences that simulations may have for materialist philosophy itself. This remarkably clear discussion from a thinker working at the intersection of science and the humanities is a must-read for anyone interested in the philosophy of technology and the philosophy of science.

 
Start Date: 
13 Jun 2011
Hours: 
6:30-8:30PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Organized by: AUDiNT (Toby Heys, Jon Cohrs, & Steve Goodman)

Presenters: Toby Heys (AUDiNT), Jon Cohrs (AUDiNT), Steve Goodman (AUDiNT), Dave Tompkins, Andy Battaglia.

This panel will explore the intersection of sonic culture and the military-entertainment complex through the disembodied voices of secret communication devices, battlefield sonic deception and propaganda, acoustic weaponry, the physiology of inaudible vibration (unsound systems) and the encrypted, viral transmission channels of both analog and digital culture.

This event is co-presented with Art in General in relation to AUDiNT's New Commission exhibition at Art in General, The Dead Record Office (June 17–July 23).

 

 
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