code

Hours: 
6:30pm - 10:30pm
Cost: 
$100; $75 for Students
Venue: 
Eyebeam
Thumbnail

Register Here!

This two-day workshop will introduce you to the basic philosophy behind transparency activism and how to accomplish it through the use of smart hacks over web platforms. Ownership, privacy and geopolitical use of data will be introduced through case histories of ethical and legal issues as well as an introduction of the main organizations and resources about Open Data.

You will learn the methodologies and mechanisms for exploring creative and unconventional uses of political data over the web. In addition, the workshop will introduce some practical tools, including simple software, coding, and other techniques and tricks to extract data from web servers.

Software that will be explored during the workshop:
iMacro, Fake, Scraperwiki, Beautiful Soup, Scrapy, etc.

Code that will be explored:
PHP, Phynton, Sql, JavaScript, DHTML, etc.

 

[1st published on fffffat]

Art aware hackers!! Your code can be art! Yes, no kidding!! Just follow the super easy tutorial below and make art today!!

Recent events have shown again that computer code and its power is still underestimated by the public and governments. The way software is written, it s quality, openess, closedness etc. has a very high impact on which way society is taking.  Some small changes or features in code can result in an enormous loss of democratic values or lead to a hidden surveillance state.  Because comparably only few people can read and understand code it is so important we communicate it, discuss it in public and make it art! :)

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Paper, wood, and traditional media aren’t tied to one vendor. They don’t require licenses or agreements. They aren’t, generally speaking, incompatible. If digital art is going to provide artists with the same freedom, it stands to reason that artists working with computation will find ways to make any pixel their medium.

Processing is a good example. It takes some time, but eventually, the understanding dawns upon you: Processing is more a design for how to code, an API, than it is a specific platform. Taken further, heck, it’s more like a way of life – sketch on paper, write simple code, prototype fast, make something happen.

 

A year ago(!) I “directed” a month long performance by Marisa Olson called “Marisa Writes her Dissertation: an endurance performance in 31 Acts.” For all of September 2008, Marisa wrote while webcam shots and screencaps of her desktop were automatically uploaded to the net every 60 seconds. This gesture of transparency was a continuation of Olson’s research into the role of sousveillance: she was partly working on dynamics of surveillance, sousveillance, and protest art in network culture. So it fit perfectly.

 
Thumbnail
ShiftSpace

While the Internet's design is widely understood to be open and distributed, control over how users interact online has given us largely centralized and closed systems. The web is undergoing a transformation whose promise is user empowerment—but who controls the terms of this new read/write web? The web has followed the physical movement of the city's social center from the (public) town square to the (private) mall. ShiftSpace attempts to subvert this trend by providing a new public space on the web.

<embed src="http://blip.tv/play/gq1alpcjhJQs%2Em4v" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="300" height="510" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed>

Project Created: 
May 2006
 
People: Mushon Zer-Aviv, Justin Blinder, Joe Moore, Florica Vlad, Doron Ben-Avraham, David Nolen, Dan Phiffer, Clint Newsome, Avital Oliver
Research: Open Culture
Project Type: Activism, Hacking, Open Source, Software, Web
Tags: web, plugin, parasitic, javascript, hacking, firefox, design, code, activism
Syndicate content