Internet Archive announces plans to publish all TV news since 2009 on its servers: 350,00 broadcasts from 20 channels. 

“You have to see this service to believe it – and even then, you may not. The Internet Archive has harnessed today’s extraordinary advances in computing power and storage capacity to capture virtually every national U.S. television news program and allow users to find and view short streamed clips on any subject. This easily searchable and sortable database will be a fantastic resource for journalists, researchers, librarians and news junkies alike.”
– Andrew Heyward, former president, CBS News


A former Christian Science Church in San Francisco houses the Internet Archive. The sturdy classical architecture—appropriate for an edifice that is at once a temple of knowledge, a library, and data vault— contains a greater volume of information than the Library of Congress, all of it kept on a modest array of drives.

Robert Miller, Director of Books, stands next to a petabyte of data (1 million gigabytes), storing a fraction of, Wayback Machine, Prelinger Film Archive and Open Library, with mirrors of the collection at Bibliotheca Alexandria, Egypt and nearby in Mountain View, California. This collection represents the foundation of Brewster Kahle’s vision to build the Library of Alexandria version 2.0, providing everyone everywhere access to all the world’s knowledge, including books, movies, music and websites.


Facebook’s proposed storage center in Lulea Sweden 60 miles south of the Arctic circle will keep data cool, using the environment as a natural heat sink.

18 degrees north, tucked away on the remote Island of Spitsbergen Norway, at a site selected for its stability, the Svalbaard Seed Bank a.k.a “Doomsday Vault” stores genetic backups of food crops with room for 4.5 million varieties. 

Venture into the icy tomb of the Cold Coast Archive, a project by Signe Lidén, Annesofie Norn & Steve Rowell 


IBM’s 120 million gigabyte array, the world’s largest data center, could hold 60 copies of the Wayback Machine, the Internet Archive’s backup of the entire web.

“This 120 petabyte system is on the lunatic fringe now, but in a few years it may be that all cloud computing systems are like it,” says Bruce Hillsberg, director of IBM storage systems in Almaden, California. 


Bytes were never built to last. Hard-drives inevitably fail; links rot; web services fold. The legacy of our civilization, our shared history and culture, depends upon the endurance of digital collections. 

Archive, a compendium of documentaries told from the perspective of archivists and cultural producers, looks at the history of the Internet and attempts to archive its contents on a massive scale: from’s Wayback Machine to the Amazon Glacier.

Cyclograph of activity in Mary Mattingly's Flock House

The Rhythmanalysis Lab is concerned with the observation, representation, and interpretation of rhythms in everyday life. Inspired by the work of Henri Lefebvre, it is a framework for projects, workshops, and investigations at the intersection of urban research, sound, and data science.

Will the (future) rhythmanalyst ... set up and direct a lab where one compares documents: graphs, frequencies and various curves? ... Just as he borrows and receives from his whole body and all his senses, so he receives data from all the sciences: psychology, sociology, ethnology, biology; and even physics and mathematics ... He will come to 'listen' to a house, a street, a town, as an audience listens to a symphony.

- Henri Lefebvre, "The Rhythmanalyst: A Previsionary Portrait" in Rhythmanalysis: Space, Time and Everyday life. New York City: Continuum, 2004. Pg. 22.

Project Created: 
April 2012

In Stranger Visions artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material collected in public places. Working with the traces strangers unwittingly leave behind, Dewey-Hagborg calls attention to the impulse toward genetic determinism and the potential for a culture of genetic surveillance.

Project Created: 
May 2012

Artists Discover the Art of Crunching Numbers

Most artists want nothing to do with numbers, and they certainly don't want their work quantified in a spreadsheet. But several data pioneers are working to convince the city's art community that number-crunching isn't only a crucial tool—it's got sex appeal.

"There is mystery in data, anticipation, adventure, even sensory gratification," said Ian Moss, the research director of Fractured Atlas. "There's a whole world out there of numbers to explore, and we in the arts are just starting to map it out. To be involved in that effort is to feel like a pioneer, in a way..."

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