I’ll be again in Rotterdam next week, teaching a one-day master class on Dead Drops at mama showroom which will be part of the Land Art For A New Generation with: Aram Bartholl (DE, 1972), Artie Vierkant (USA, 1986), Coralie Vogelaar (NL, 1981) & Teun Castelein (NL, 1980), Dennis de Bel (NL, 1984), Jeremy Wood (UK, 1976), JODI (BE/NL, 1968), Juliette Bonneviot (FR, 1983), Kari Altmann (USA, 1983), Constant Dullaart (NL, 1979)


TAZ, 5.11.2010

Financial Times DE, 18.11.2010


Posted by Soulskill on Saturday October 30, @05:56PM
from the peer-to-peer-sneakernet dept.
Okian Warrior writes "Aram Bartholl is building a series of USB dead drops in New York City. Billed as 'an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space,' he has embedded USB sticks as file cache devices throughout the city. Bartholl says, 'I am "injecting" USB flash drives into walls, buildings and curbs accessible to anybody in public space. You are invited to go to these places (so far 5 in NYC) to drop or find files on a dead drop. Plug your laptop to a wall, house or pole to share your files and data.' Current locations (more to come) include: 87 3rd Avenue, Brooklyn, NY (Makerbot), Empire Fulton Ferry Park, Brooklyn, NY (Dumbo), 235 Bowery, NY (New Museum), Union Square, NY (Subway Station 14th St), and West 21st Street, NY (Eyebeam)"


If you're walking around bustling New York City, it's probably not with an open laptop. But if you were... you might notice the five USB flash drives that Aram Bartholl installed into walls and columns around the city. The small ports wait for someone to walk by, plug in a laptop, and drop off or pick up some files.

Simple as that.


Sometimes it feels like sharing a flash drive around an office is dangerous enough. The question is, do you feel lucky enough to trust one stuck in a public wall?

Article by Scott Stein


02 Nov 10 13:00 by wconeybeer in category Piracy, USB Sticks

An interesting new offline anonymous form of file-sharing is literally taking to the streets as online services are increasingly targeted by anti-piracy groups and legislation.

Dead Drops is the name that Aram Bartholl has given his radical file-sharing endeavor, a project that is part of his residency at the Eyebeam Art + Technology Center.


by Don_Caldwell on Monday, Nov 01, 2010

Limewire may be dead, but if you are in NYC you can still share files, and you don’t even need to connect to the Internet.


by Matthew Zuras on November 1, 2010 at 11:15 AM

As part of his residency at Eyebeam, Aram Bartholl sealed five USB flash drives into the walls of several New York City buildings, such as the New Museum, Eyebeam and the Union Square subway station, allowing anyone with a laptop to plug in and share whatever they want. "'Dead Drops' is an anonymous, offline, peer-to-peer file-sharing network in public space," writes Bartholl on his site.

We can't imagine that they'll last too long, though, before getting filled up with illicit porn, indie band demo albums and terrible poetry. Check out the full list of the drives' locations at Bartholl's site.

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