Fashion

Hours: 
Fri 6-9PM, Sat 10AM-5PM, Sun 12PM-2PM
Cost: 
TBD
Venue: 
Eyebeam/NRI
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As part of the Computational Fashion initiative, Eyebeam in collaboration with NRI, are presenting a three-day workshop on digital fabrication technologies for fashion. Participants will learn the fundamentals of 3D modeling software, taking an idea from concept design to prototype. The workshop will also introduce theories of computer-aided design, parametric design, digital fabrication, and 3D printing. All participants will produce their own 3D printed model at NRI's Manhattan facilities.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS:

 
Start Date: 
11 Dec 2013
Hours: 
7:00PM-9:00PM
Cost: 
$10
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Powering comfortable and easy to maintain smart devices and garments is one of the biggest challenges facing designers working in fashion and wearable tech. How might technology be seamlessly integrated into textiles so that they're wireless, rechargeable, and washable? Can hardware really be soft? Join us at the next Computational Fashion panel as engineer and battery expert Dan Steingart (Princeton University) moderates the discussion featuring John Kymissis (Columbia University) and other designers, scientists, and engineers working at the cutting edge of energy and high performance wear.

Panelists:

Dan Steingart, Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton. 

 
Projects: Computational Fashion
People: John Kymissis, Dan Steingart
Tags: Fashion, design, Computational Fashion, batteries
Start Date: 
19 Nov 2013
Hours: 
5:00PM-9:00PM
Cost: 
$10
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Join us for a Computational Fashion double event!

Fashion and Wearable Tech Demo Night (5 - 9pm)
Fashion and the Body panel (6:30 - 8pm)

 

EVENT DATE: Tuesday, November 19, 5 - 9pm

As part of the Computational Fashion initiative, Eyebeam is hosting a Fashion and Wearable Tech Demo Night on November 19. We’re looking for compelling product ideas and emerging startups who are working at the intersection of (wearable) technology, garments, jewelry, and accessories. Each participant will get a table in Eyebeam's exhibition space to do informal presentations and demonstrations.

Participants must have a finished product or working prototype that is intended for the commercial market. Sorry, we're not looking for student projects or work that is only in concept stage at this time.

 
Start Date: 
21 May 2013
Hours: 
6:00PM-9:00PM
Cost: 
$25.00
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE

 
Projects: Computational Fashion
People: Arthur Young-Spivey, Francis Bitonti, Sabine Seymour
Tags: 3D printing, digital fabrication, Fashion, wearable technology
Start Date: 
12 Dec 2012
Hours: 
6:00PM-8:00PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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An Introduction to Computational Fashion:
Transforming design, textiles and the social experience around wearable technology

 
Projects: Computational Fashion
People: Gabi Asfour, Kaho Abe, Katherine Isbister, Sabine Seymour
Research: Open Culture
Tags: Art and Design, Fashion, hacking, wearable technology

I wanted to make the initial run of Fortune Cookie Coin Purses myself. So I made my own leather cutting machine by hacking together pieces from different professional cutting machines. The machine I made was difficult to operate, so I went to visit a professional cutter where I learned that the most efficient way to cut the coin purses was actually by hand with scissors. The cutter was really nice and will be cutting my next product.

 

While vinyl is eco friendly, I wanted to make my Fortune Cookie Coin Purses with real, high-grade leather . I decided to recycle remnant leather. But finding the leather was a big adventure and took months of finding pieces here and there. I feel like the cookies have different personalities, because each piece of leather has it’s own story.

 

Fortune Cookie Coin Purse was been in development for four months, here’s a look back at the first sketch, prototype, and dust bag mock up. I’ve been wanting to create a Fortune Cookie Coin Purse for years. I really studied the shape of the real cookie to get the angle of the cookie’s pinch just right. The dust bag design was inspired by gourmet food wrappers and Chinese paper cuts.

 




I’m excited to launch my website with my first product, the Fortune Cookie Coin Purse.

Fortune Cookie Coin Purse holds a small fortune. Like real fortune cookies, these purses are proudly made in the USA. Made from recycled leather, each purse has a unique number on it so you can track its origin.

Purchase here for $45

 
People: Diana Eng
Tags: Fashion
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