Fashion

I wanted to make the initial run of Fortune Cookie Coin Purses myself. So I made my own leather cutting machine by hacking together pieces from different professional cutting machines. The machine I made was difficult to operate, so I went to visit a professional cutter where I learned that the most efficient way to cut the coin purses was actually by hand with scissors. The cutter was really nice and will be cutting my next product.

 

While vinyl is eco friendly, I wanted to make my Fortune Cookie Coin Purses with real, high-grade leather . I decided to recycle remnant leather. But finding the leather was a big adventure and took months of finding pieces here and there. I feel like the cookies have different personalities, because each piece of leather has it’s own story.

 

Fortune Cookie Coin Purse was been in development for four months, here’s a look back at the first sketch, prototype, and dust bag mock up. I’ve been wanting to create a Fortune Cookie Coin Purse for years. I really studied the shape of the real cookie to get the angle of the cookie’s pinch just right. The dust bag design was inspired by gourmet food wrappers and Chinese paper cuts.

 




I’m excited to launch my website with my first product, the Fortune Cookie Coin Purse.

Fortune Cookie Coin Purse holds a small fortune. Like real fortune cookies, these purses are proudly made in the USA. Made from recycled leather, each purse has a unique number on it so you can track its origin.

Purchase here for $45

 
People: Diana Eng
Tags: Fashion
Start Date: 
19 Nov 2010
Hours: 
7PM–10PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Celebrate the launch of Sabine Seymour's new book Functional Aesthetics at Eyebeam. Functional Aesthetics, the sequel to Seymour’s highly acclaimed book Fashionable Technology (Springer 2008), explores state-of-the-art artistic and design examples with a focus on their aesthetic and functional aspects. Chapters such as Context as Prerequisite, Body Sculpture, or Transparent Sustainability provide in-depth studies of visionary projects between the poles of fashion, design, technology, and sciences, which could stimulate new developments in the blossoming field of Fashionable Technology. The book also includes relevant information on DIY resources, publications, inspirations, and much more.

 

Diana Eng’s Fairytale Fashion Show at Eyebeam NYC / 20100224.7D.03591.P1.C45 /

 

What happens when we use a brand's code to distribute our own message?

Activist group GAIA will be collaborating with Hacking Couture in this workshop.

Hacking Couture is a platform for launching new fashion creations through an open source approach of reverse engineering fashion brands and making the code available online. Hands on workshops encourage participants to create using the codes regardless of their level of fashion knowledge, and to engage in the larger fashion conversation. By understanding the coding of established fashion, this project provides a platform to empower participants to step up and create.

Sign-up here.

 

What is it like for another designer to follow the Hacking Couture structure? Come and design with us.

Led by Brooklyn based designer Charlotte Gaspard, Creative Director of C.Spot Designs.

Hacking Couture is a platform for launching new fashion creations through an open source approach of reverse engineering fashion brands and making the code available online. Hands on workshops encourage participants to create using the codes regardless of their level of fashion knowledge, and to engage in the larger fashion conversation. By understanding the coding of established fashion, this project provides a platform to empower participants to step up and create.

Sign-up here.

 
hacking-couture.com

Moderated by Dustyn Roberts, Eyebeam

Disscussants: Bre Pettis, MakerBot; Giana González, Hacking Couture; Becky Stern, CRAFT and MAKE Magazines, Sternlab

Using Re:Group exhibited projects MakerBot and Hacking Couture as a point of departure, Open Retail will explore the intersection between the engineering and fashion industries, and the ways in which open source practices are influencing them both.

 

July 14, 7-9PM

Led by Giana Gonzalez, Hacking Couture

What is sustainable fashion? Why are design codes important? How do we decode them? Curator Sarah Scaturro and interaction designer Giana González will use these questions as a starting point to work with participants to explore how the code for the sustainable fashion movement can be decoded and reassembled.

 
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