How To Win

reposted from BeyondTheChior

A while back Chris Mooney, author of The Republican War on Science, offered some sound advice to climate scientists about “good climate communication”. Basically, if you’re a climate scientist who wants society to take your data seriously, you have to be something of a political scientist too. Mooney spotlights the Evangelical Climate Initiative as an example of good climate communication that can reach a broader constituency. It’s something that’s “not what you’d expect”. The name itself breaks a popular stereotype about who cares about climate — and a stereotype about evangelicals: that they’re inherently anti-science.

 

Stephen Hoban has written a great summary and the full story is on Splitsider. Here’s the beginning:

 

The following is an article about the artist Tania Bruguera and and her year-long project of living with and “as” an immigrant in NYC. This raises the question of: How does this art address and/or effect poor immigrants’ lives? The most charitable reading is that the artist intends to use her position of power and access (she is being written about in the Times after all) to shine a light on the conditions of  immigrants in NYC.  But does anyone really not know about the poverty and living conditions of most immigrants? And…does knowledge really change anything anyway?

 

From The Right To Be Lazy. Ned Ludd was a fictitious leader. Costumes, jokes, and more. Here’s an excerpt:

“The Luddites, as they soon became known, were dead serious about their protests. … But they were also making fun, dispatching officious-sounding letters that began, ‘Whereas by the Charter’…and ended ‘Ned Lud’s Office, Sherwood Forest.’ Invoking the sly banditry of Nottinghamshire’s own Robin Hood suited their sense of social justice. The taunting, world-turned-upside-down character of their protests also led them to march in women’s clothes as ‘General Ludd’s wives.’

But definitely read the whole thing.

 

Ethan Zuckerman has posted a beautiful piece that stitches together many of the ideas we deal with in How To Win and the Center for Artistic Activism. I can’t recommend it enough:

Overcoming political polarization… but not through facts

It ties together polarization, confirmation bias, the media, David Simon and The Wire, and the need for addressing values and narrative before facts.

I’ll post it here for the sake of archiving:

Overcoming political polarization… but not through facts

by Ethan Zuckerman

 

We thought: culture is much more important than politics. Let’s just start getting people living the way they wanna live.

You wanna live in a world where you don’t have to work? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a world where you can get food for free? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a house with lots of women and men and live the way you want? Let’s do it.

Let’s make the world that you imagine real by acting it out.

And if you can act it out, it’s real.

– Peter Coyote on The Diggers

From a PBS documentary on The Diggers.

 

The Next Generation of New Urbanists yes, these are young New Urbanists, because New Urbanism has been around long enough that it’s getting a little … old and the Street Plans Collaborative want to help. They’ve put together a “Tactical Urbanism” guide that you can download for use when you need some ideas about how to catalyze lasting change in your urban world.

Examples include guerrilla gardening, pop-up cafés, mobile vendors, and “Build a Better Block” projects. Most involve partnership with government agencies or local business owners, but they are almost all things that ordinary folks can initiate. Here’s how the guide’s authors explain the concept of “tactical urbanism”:

 

Duncombe and I have said more than once “you can change the laws, but it won’t matter if the culture doesn’t change with it.” For lack of a better term, I’m going to call this – for now – a Culture Gap.

A change may be “the right thing,” environmentally, economically, socially, for justice, but if people aren’t ready for it the change wont happen. Worse, you may see a backlash against the policy or enforcement.

Sadly, this may be what’s happening in the argument over New York City bike lanes. An extensive New York Magazine article today dives into these ideas:

 

Design with Intent:101 Patterns for Influencing Behaviour Through Design

All design influences our behaviour, but as designers we don’t always consciously consider the power this gives us to help people, (and, sometimes, to manipulate them). There’s a huge opportunity for design for behaviour change to address social and environmental issues where people’s behaviour is important, but as yet little in the way of a guide for designers and other stakeholders, bringing together knowledge and examples from different disciplines, and drawing parallels which can allow concepts to be usefully transposed. The Design with Intent toolkit (the cards and wiki) aims to make a start, however small, on this task.

 
Police protect people from books

Police protect people from books

By Sarah Amsler Lecturer in Sociology at Aston University (Birmingham, UK) via the Huffington Post

 
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