Internet Archive announces plans to publish all TV news since 2009 on its servers: 350,00 broadcasts from 20 channels. 

“You have to see this service to believe it – and even then, you may not. The Internet Archive has harnessed today’s extraordinary advances in computing power and storage capacity to capture virtually every national U.S. television news program and allow users to find and view short streamed clips on any subject. This easily searchable and sortable database will be a fantastic resource for journalists, researchers, librarians and news junkies alike.”
– Andrew Heyward, former president, CBS News


A former Christian Science Church in San Francisco houses the Internet Archive. The sturdy classical architecture—appropriate for an edifice that is at once a temple of knowledge, a library, and data vault— contains a greater volume of information than the Library of Congress, all of it kept on a modest array of drives.

Robert Miller, Director of Books, stands next to a petabyte of data (1 million gigabytes), storing a fraction of, Wayback Machine, Prelinger Film Archive and Open Library, with mirrors of the collection at Bibliotheca Alexandria, Egypt and nearby in Mountain View, California. This collection represents the foundation of Brewster Kahle’s vision to build the Library of Alexandria version 2.0, providing everyone everywhere access to all the world’s knowledge, including books, movies, music and websites.


Facebook’s proposed storage center in Lulea Sweden 60 miles south of the Arctic circle will keep data cool, using the environment as a natural heat sink.

18 degrees north, tucked away on the remote Island of Spitsbergen Norway, at a site selected for its stability, the Svalbaard Seed Bank a.k.a “Doomsday Vault” stores genetic backups of food crops with room for 4.5 million varieties. 

Venture into the icy tomb of the Cold Coast Archive, a project by Signe Lidén, Annesofie Norn & Steve Rowell 


IBM’s 120 million gigabyte array, the world’s largest data center, could hold 60 copies of the Wayback Machine, the Internet Archive’s backup of the entire web.

“This 120 petabyte system is on the lunatic fringe now, but in a few years it may be that all cloud computing systems are like it,” says Bruce Hillsberg, director of IBM storage systems in Almaden, California. 


Bytes were never built to last. Hard-drives inevitably fail; links rot; web services fold. The legacy of our civilization, our shared history and culture, depends upon the endurance of digital collections. 

Archive, a compendium of documentaries told from the perspective of archivists and cultural producers, looks at the history of the Internet and attempts to archive its contents on a massive scale: from’s Wayback Machine to the Amazon Glacier.

Start Date: 
7 Oct 2011

Eyebeam invites you to join us for a discussion on the future of internet economies. What might be strategies to explore and build alternate economies? Eyebeam Fellow Fran Ilich, alums Stephanie Rothenberg and Jeff Crouse, and Finnish researcher Susanna Paasonen will lead discussion to examine the worlds of online porn, digital labor, and alternative finance models.


On Monday night, we went to check out Speedshow, an internet cafe takeover staged by Evan Roth (whose work is at MoMA for “Talk To Me”) and curated by Aram Bartholl (of Dead Drops). It surprised me that traditional style internet cafes still exist and this one at 90 Bowery is a throwback to those from the ’90s and early 2000s, with tons of kids playing first person shooter video games. It’s in the basement of the building down a narrow staircase, lending further mystique in a neighborhood known for its secret underground passageways.


Ronaldo Lemos explora os novos caminhos trilhados por artistas que integram a tecnologia às suas criações, não apenas como uma ferramenta, mas até mesmo como assunto central. Aaron Meyers é um designer e programador, que produz diversos aplicativos para a web. Fran Ilich, artista de contra-cul



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Aram Bartholl

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A generation of political activists have been transformed by new tools developed on the internet. Here, a leading net commentator profiles seven young radicals from around the world

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