interview

Eye to Eyebeam is a new series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows. The series will include interviews, photos, and other information and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

From sound collages and virtual sculpture to his collaborative website gifpumper, Slava Balasanov’s projects are riotous, self-aware of their digital status. The Digit, an augmented reality sculpture of two connected thumbs, is only visible through an iPhone app, where it can be seen hovering over Union Square, its chrome surface mirroring the sky and ground. After making a few additions to gifpumper, Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro sat down with Slava for a chat about some of his past work.

Katherine DiPierro: What are you planning on doing during your residency?

 

Eye to Eyebeam is a new series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows. The series will include interviews, photos, and other information and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

For many years now, Matt Parker has been developing ways to redefine and subvert video games. Many of his physical games utilize interactive screens that represent participating players in unusual ways, such as his motion game Recurse, which was a finalist at Indiecade 2010. Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro, who’s still amazed how inexpensive it is to make your own 3D projector, sat down with Matt to chat about his work.

Katherine DiPierro: What projects will you be working on as part of your residency?

 
Projects: Eye To Eyebeam, Fellowships, Residencies
People: Katherine DiPierro, Matt Parker, Matthew Parker
Tags: fellows, interview, Katherine DiPierro, Matthew Parker, residents

(Photo credit: Michelle Calabro)

Eye to Eyebeam is a new series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows. The series will include interviews, photos, and other information and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

For Eyebeam Fellow Nova Jiang, participatory creativity is everything. From participant-manipulated puppets to a comic book that generates itself, her intricate mechanical projects engage viewers in unexpected ways and lead to shared social events. More importantly, Nova’s work playfully invites viewers to become collaborators in the pieces by adding their own creative thoughts or actions. Intrepid Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro sat down with Nova to chat about her work.

 

Work Smarter, Not Harder [an interview w/Evan Roth]
June 29th, 2011
by Nick Briz

Evan Roth is a prolific producer whose activities take on many different forms, including teaching, collaborating, engineering, collecting gifs, analyzing graffiti, enriching the public domain, developing tools of empowerment and raising awareness of issues pertaining to the open-web and free speech. His work is most comfortable where the interests of activists, artists, and general web meanderers intersect.

 

If you're walking around bustling New York City, it's probably not with an open laptop. But if you were... you might notice the five USB flash drives that Aram Bartholl installed into walls and columns around the city. The small ports wait for someone to walk by, plug in a laptop, and drop off or pick up some files.

Simple as that.

 

Digital media artist and activist Joseph DeLappe discusses his work at the Museum of Modern Art.

 

Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus. June 8 Party. Press lift for Internet Week NY

 

Zach Lieberman of the Graffiti Research Lab started working on the EyeWriter with one man in mind: Los Angeles-based graffiti artist Tony Quan.

 

After realizing that calculus and engineering weren’t exactly her style, Diana Eng decided to put her quantitative talents to work elsewhere: in the fashion industry.

 
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