politics

Hours: 
6:30pm - 10:30pm
Cost: 
$100; $75 for Students
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Register Here!

This two-day workshop will introduce you to the basic philosophy behind transparency activism and how to accomplish it through the use of smart hacks over web platforms. Ownership, privacy and geopolitical use of data will be introduced through case histories of ethical and legal issues as well as an introduction of the main organizations and resources about Open Data.

You will learn the methodologies and mechanisms for exploring creative and unconventional uses of political data over the web. In addition, the workshop will introduce some practical tools, including simple software, coding, and other techniques and tricks to extract data from web servers.

Software that will be explored during the workshop:
iMacro, Fake, Scraperwiki, Beautiful Soup, Scrapy, etc.

Code that will be explored:
PHP, Phynton, Sql, JavaScript, DHTML, etc.

 

Ethan Zuckerman has posted a beautiful piece that stitches together many of the ideas we deal with in How To Win and the Center for Artistic Activism. I can’t recommend it enough:

Overcoming political polarization… but not through facts

It ties together polarization, confirmation bias, the media, David Simon and The Wire, and the need for addressing values and narrative before facts.

I’ll post it here for the sake of archiving:

Overcoming political polarization… but not through facts

by Ethan Zuckerman

 

We thought: culture is much more important than politics. Let’s just start getting people living the way they wanna live.

You wanna live in a world where you don’t have to work? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a world where you can get food for free? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a house with lots of women and men and live the way you want? Let’s do it.

Let’s make the world that you imagine real by acting it out.

And if you can act it out, it’s real.

– Peter Coyote on The Diggers

From a PBS documentary on The Diggers.

 

Duncombe and I have said more than once “you can change the laws, but it won’t matter if the culture doesn’t change with it.” For lack of a better term, I’m going to call this – for now – a Culture Gap.

A change may be “the right thing,” environmentally, economically, socially, for justice, but if people aren’t ready for it the change wont happen. Worse, you may see a backlash against the policy or enforcement.

Sadly, this may be what’s happening in the argument over New York City bike lanes. An extensive New York Magazine article today dives into these ideas:

 

Format note: Written as a grant proposal.

Forks vs. Knives – Developing the code that governs us

Describe your project

Reaching consensus is never easy and when it gets really tough some reach for their knives. We say, drop the knives and pick up the forks.

 

Attempts by the Obama administration to regulate greenhouse gases are highly unpopular here because of opposition to large-scale government intervention. Some are skeptical that humans might fundamentally alter a world that was created by God.

If the heartland is to seriously reduce its dependence on coal and oil, Ms. Jackson and others decided, the issues must be separated. So the project ran an experiment to see if by focusing on thrift, patriotism, spiritual conviction and economic prosperity, it could rally residents of six Kansas towns to take meaningful steps to conserve energy and consider renewable fuels.

via In Kansas, Climate Skeptics Embrace Green Energy – NYTimes.com.

 

In Light of Recent Events
An exhibition of necessary research
during Art Basel, Miami Beach

Curated by SPECTREVISION
Wynwood Arts District, December 2-5, 2010
Lions Gallery @ Museovault
346 NW 29th Street, Miami, FL 33127

Showcasing contemporary work inspired by current events. In navigating the borderlands of investigative practice, spectre long ago abandoned the catalogue notion of “genre”; as such spectrevision humbly presents studio art work juxtaposed interchangeably with experiments and efforts that defy current modes of categorization, displayed alongside research materials and other relevant findings.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

A generation of political activists have been transformed by new tools developed on the internet. Here, a leading net commentator profiles seven young radicals from around the world

 
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