Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus

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Corporate Commands is an ongoing series of public space performances based on corporate advertisements in the form of the imperative such as "Just Do It", "Turn on the Future", "Think different", etc. The Institute for Infinitely Small Things performs these corporate commands where they occur in the urban landscape, enacting each command as literally as possible. Past performances include: "Rollover", "Say it with Flowers", "Become a Believer", and "Enjoy Life".

 

Project Created: 
May 2004
 
People: Institute for Infinitely Small Things
Project Type: Activism, Exhibited Project, Performance Art
Tags: actions, performance, Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus
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Steve Lambert and Packard Jennings asked Bay Area architects, city planners, and transportation engineers, “What would you do if you didn’t have to worry about budgets, bureaucracy, politics, or physics?” Ideas from these conversations were then merged, developed, and perhaps mildly exaggerated by the artists to create a series of 6 posters for the San Francisco Arts Commission’s Art on Market Street Program. Supported by the Eyebeam OpenLab.

Project Created: 
October 2007
 
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Hacking Couture is a platform for launching new fashion creations through an open source approach of reverse engineering fashion brands and making the code available online. Hands on workshops encourage participants to create using the codes regardless of their level of fashion knowledge, and to engage in the larger fashion conversation. By understanding the coding of established fashion, this project provides a platform to empower participants to step up and create.

Project Created: 
May 2006
 
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Ten Thousand Cents is a digital artwork that creates a representation of a $100 bill. Using a custom drawing tool, thousands of individuals working in isolation from one another painted a tiny part of the bill without knowledge of the overall task. Workers were paid one cent each via Amazon's Mechanical Turk distributed labor tool. The total labor cost to create the bill, the artwork being created, and the reproductions available for purchase (to charity) are all $100. The work is presented as a video piece with all 10,000 parts being drawn simultaneously. The project explores the circumstances we live in, a new and uncharted combination of digital labor markets, "crowdsourcing," "virtual economies," and digital reproduction.

 

Project Created: 
May 2008
 
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On May 4, 2007, Evan Roth and Ben Engebreth asked internet users to help isolate Michael Jackson's white glove in all 10,060 frames of his landmark televised performance of "Billy Jean". 72 hours later, 125,000 gloves had been located. The collected data was released for all to download and use as an input into any digital system. Resulting work was submitted online and presented in gallery exhibitions. Supported by Rhizome Commissions Program and the Eyebeam OpenLab. Print loan courtesy of Bobby Houlihan.

Project Created: 
May 2007
 
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