sculpture

Here are a few verses the algorithm generated today. I especially enjoy the first one as two of my good friends are getting married today in California (congrats Dan and Ellie! sorry it’s not more upbeat…)

joyously the bridal garland
perish too thy hated name and
warlike steed and throw the dart
dear in joy and part in silence

and their faces ran with blood of
earth loving sons your virtues prove
arjun and on kuru’s king and
lost him to restore the kingdom

larger stouter is this kuru
bowing to her weeping sister
bright celestial cars in concourse
lightninglike it came on karna

render honour to thy king and
lost himself and all was still and
torn not the deep and deadly sound
heaving sobs convulsed her bosom

 

50/50
wood, aluminum, electrical
53in x 80in x 8in

Represented here as an animated gif. Pardon the pixelation we sacrifice for the animation.

Shown at “If These Walls Could Talk” at Marine Art Salon and Charlie James Gallery

 

Trust Me
wood, aluminum, electrical
28in x 50in x 6in

Shown at “If These Walls Could Talk” at Marine Art Salon and Charlie James Gallery

Video to come…

 

Last week, I began a 4-month residency at Recology San Francisco (a.k.a. The Dump) where I make art solely from the refuse that people drop off in their cars and trucks. I am treating this residency as a performance.

I am playing the role of a prospector from the future who mines the garbage heaps of a past civilization to build technologies to survive. Trawling through construction debris, discarded electronics and the scraps of people’s lives, I am making blueprints and building imaginary devices such as a food synthesizer and an infinite battery.

scott_with_cart

 
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Ruins (1), detail from an installation of tumors - printed on eyebeam's Dimension 3D printer

For most of the 200,000 women in the United States diagnosed with breast cancer each year, medical imaging is the entry point into the disease. Yet, rarely does a woman get to see her M.R.I. or get a sense of the shape or physicality of the malignancy inside her. Research suggests that tumor visualization can be an important aspect of dealing with the aftermath of cancer, with positive psychological and possibly physiological effects on patients.

Project Created: 
November 2010
 

Today we shifted to the virus-making portion of Gift Horse, where anyone can assemble a virus sculpture to be placed inside the belly of the Trojan Horse. The gesture is to gather people in real space, give them a way to hand-construct their “artwork” and to hide hundeds of the mini-sculptures inside the horse.

The first virus to go inside, the Rat of the Chinese zodiac, was The Andromeda Strain, an imaginary virus from the film. This father-daughter team cut, folded and glued the paper sculpture together and she did the honors of secreting it inside the armature.

 

Compared to last night’s construction frenzy, today was calm and involved detail work and time on the computer to preparing the paper viruses sculptures.

 

The first part of the day was what I’ve often experienced while making projects onsite: several runs to box hardware stores looking around for the right fittings and being horribly inefficient. By mid-afternoon we hit our stride and fortunately, all the measurements we made in the Sketchup model of the Gift Horse translated perfectly to real life. Astounding.

By late afternoon we were finally assembling the wagon for the giant Trojan Horse, which will be pushed during the Green Prix parade on Saturday, September 18th by many costumed Greek Warriors. Later in the day, the horse will be “gifted” to the San Jose Art Museum, where it will join the Retro-Tech exhibition.

 

This is a family of eight paper virus sculptures for the Gift Horse project, which has 12 more days to go as a Kickstarter project. You can donate here.

Top row (left to right): Andromeda Strain, Tobacco Mosaic Virus, T-Virus (from Resident Evil), Rabies, Smallpox
Bottom row: Foot-in-mouth disease, Snow Crash, Dengue Fever

Virus All_screen

 
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