social media

Thumbnail

Wages For Facebook draws upon ideas from a 1970s feminist activist campaign as means to think through and challenge relationships of capitalism, class and affective labor at stake within social media today.

In the 70s Wages For Housework demanded that the state pay women for their unwaged housework and caregiving, as the market economy was built upon massive amounts of this unacknowledged work—and its laborers could be seen to constitute a huge working class entirely overlooked by existing Marxist or socialist critiques. Wages for Housework built upon discourse from the anticolonial movement in order to extend the analysis of unwaged labor from the factory to the home. Along these lines Wages For Facebook attempts to draw upon feminist discourse to extend the discussion of unwaged labor to new forms of value creation and exploitation online.

Project Created: 
January 2014
 

4 descriptions

autumn in New York
http://www.alansondheim.org/autumn.mp4

Slava's gifpumper with events, video
http://www.alansondheim.org/gf.mp4

Slava's gifpumper with events, still
http://www.alansondheim.org/gfevent.jpg

Eyebeam window installation at night behind closed shutters
http://www.alansondheim.org/installnite2.mp4

 

Social Media at The Pace Gallery assembles a group of artists responding to the internet, whether as a way of bringing people together, as an aesthetic influence, or as a state of affairs to regard skeptically and even satirize. Social Media takes a long view that starts in the 1960s with Robert Heinecken (the show’s one pre-internet artist), who altered magazines like Time and Mademoiselle with his own collages and put them back on supermarket racks for others to stumble on. Since Heinecken, the idea of pulling from, responding to, and feeding back into the media has become more commonplace – Twitter, Tumblr, conceptual art video games, supercuts, and super supercuts attest to the prevalence of Heinecken’s media interventionism.

 

Wednesday March 23rd, 6:30PM
CUNY Graduate Center Room C198
365 5th Ave

The Digital Studies Seminar at the CUNY Graduate Center’s Center for the Humanities will be hosting a dialogue between journalism scholars Jay Rosen and C.W. Anderson entitled “The People Formerly Known as the Audience: Five Years Later.” The conversation will focus on how the changes in media audiences articulated in Rosen’s influential post “The People Formerly Known as the Audience” have further transformed over the last five years.

 

The Internets is all buzzing with chatter against Facebook’s latest privacy breaches. Into this happy mix a bunch of NYU students have been cast as the Davids against the social networking Goliath. Is that really a good thing? Can we help?


Friends are there... or are they?

Diaspora is a new initiative by 4 NYU students to create a “privacy aware, personally controlled, do-it-all distributed open source social network” by the end of the summer. A worthy mission indeed with quite an ambitious time line.

 

Communication breakdown… It’s never the same. How I tried to extend my social network to beyond just “friends” and came off as a douche bag

In my previous post titled “Relationship: It’s Complicated” I was trying to make the point that social media interfaces and terminologies excludes the room for conflict. I came up with three proposition for intervention, one of them worked or rather took a life of its own much faster than I expected.

I was proposing to use Twitter list to follow not just like-minded people, but also people you often disagree with, as a way of both challenging your point of view and of engaging beyond our networked echo chamber. (read more about it on my post)

 

Ignoring my grandma… friending my enemies… WTF? Is it even reasonable to expect social media to reflect the depth our social life? And when it fails, what do we stand to lose? (+ tips & hacks)


Facebook, in a rare instance of honesty

 
Syndicate content