untethered

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Hans-Christoph Steiner spends his time making private communications software usable by everyone, designing interactive software with a focus on human perceptual capabilities, building networks with free software, and composing music with computers. With an emphasis on collaboration, he has worked in many forms, including free software for mobile and embedded devices, responsive sound environments, free wireless networks that help build community, musical robots that listen, programming environments allow people to play with math, and a jet-powered fish that you can ride. To further his research, he teaches and works at various media art centers and organizes open, collaborative hacklabs and barcamp conferences. He is currently building encrypted, anonymous communications devices as part of the Guardian Project as well as teaching courses in interaction design and media programming NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program and workshops around the world.

Eyebeam CV
2009FTeaching Artist
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2008F
SResident
 
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Hypnica, 2007. Image courtesy of the artist

A series of talking metronomes that use the voices of hypnotists to lull the listener into a sonic trance.

Project Created: 
January 2007
 
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Paul DeMarinis has been working as an electronic media artist since 1971 and has created numerous performance works, sound and computer installations and interactive electronic inventions. He has performed internationally, at The Kitchen, Festival d'Automne a Paris, Het Apollohuis in Holland and at Ars Electronica in Linz and created music for Merce Cunningham Dance Co. His interactive audio artworks have been shown at the I.C.C. in Tokyo, Bravin Post Lee Gallery in New York and The Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco. He has been an Artist-in-Residence at The Exploratorium and at Xerox PARC and has received major awards and fellowships in both Visual Arts and Music from The National Endowment for the Arts, N.Y.F.A., N.Y.S.C.A., the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. Much of his work involves speech processed and synthesized by computers, available on the Lovely Music Ltd.

Eyebeam CV
2008FExhibiting Artist
S
 
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Toastie, 2004. Photo by Christine Butler

Toastie is an interactive, sensitive, intelligent, voice controlled toaster with a mind of its own. It is one of the works in Dobson's Machine Therapy series.

Project Created: 
January 2004
 
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Photo by Christine Butler

Blendie is an interactive, sensitive, intelligent, voice controlled blender with a mind of its own. Materials are a 1950’s Osterizer blender altered with custom made hardware and software for sound analysis and motor control.

People induce the blender to spin by sounding the sounds of its motor in action. A person may growl low pitch blender-like sounds to get it to spin slow (Blendie pitch and power matches the person) and the person can growl blender-style at higher pitches to speed up Blendie. The experience for the participant is to speak the language of the machine and thus to more deeply understand and connect with the machine. The action may also bring about personal revelations in the participant. The participant empathizes with Blendie and in this new approach to a domestic appliance, a conscious and personally meaningful relationship is facilitated.

Project Created: 
January 2004
 
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Photo by Christine Butler

Kelly Dobson grew up in a junkyard. From the age of four she was doing odd jobs such as smashing windows and hauling machine parts from one area of the yard to another. She had machine friends. By six she was holding car funerals and secretly stashing beloved car parts in her own hidden burrow in the far side of the lot. Abandoning the instability of the lot as a teenager in 1990, Dobson began studies in medicine and art, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Cornell University’s Department of Architecture, Art and Planning. The studies in medicine and art practice provide background for her interests in alternative forms of therapy. Working in the realms of art, design, engineering, psychology and society, Kelly explores the relationships between people and machines, and has received a Master of Science degree from MIT’s Visual Studies Program and another from the MIT Media Lab.

Eyebeam CV
2008FExhibiting Artist
S
 
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Fair Weather Forces (Water Level), 2008. Photo: Christine Butler, courtesy of Eyebeam

A row of up to six stainless-steel posts linked by velvet ropes recalls institutional and social crowd-control situations. The attachment points for the ropes automatically slide up and down the stanchions in direct relationship to the current water level in a nearby body of water (transmitted in real time over the Internet from a custom-built sensor). The situation thus suggests that passage/admission is permitted, restrained or directed according to the changing condition of the tide, water level and waves, hinting at relationships between phenomena that might otherwise seem disparate: aspects of social sorting evoked by the barriers (admission, exclusion, approval, class distinctions); economic and political conditions such as trade, migration and tourism that affecting the region; and the vagaries of the natural environment.

Project Created: 
January 2008
 
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Germaine Koh is a Canadian visual artist based in Vancouver. Her conceptually generated work is concerned with the significance of everyday actions, familiar objects and common places. Her recent schedule has included shows at the BALTIC Centre (Newcastle), De Appel (Amsterdam), Martin-Gropius-Bau(Berlin), Ottawa Art Gallery, and le Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin), Para/Site Art Space (Hong Kong), Frankfurter Kunstverein, Bloomberg SPACE (London), the Seoul Museum of Art, Artspace(Sydney), The British Museum (London), The Power Plant (Toronto), the Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver), Plug In ICA (Winnipeg), Ex Teresa Arte Actual (Mexico City), the Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto), and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions. She has participated in the Liverpool Biennial 2004, 1998 Biennale of Sydney, and La Biennale de Montréal 2000, and she was a finalist for the 2004 Sobey Art Award.

Eyebeam CV
2008FExhibiting Artist
SExhibiting Artist
 
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Nothing In It, 2008. Photo: Christine Butler, courtesy of Eyebeam

Nothing In It (2008), a handbag that sounds its contents when opened.

Project Created: 
August 2008
 
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