video

Start Date: 
31 Jul 2007
Hours: 
7:00pm
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Upgrade! NY
July 31, 2007

upgradeny.blip.tv

 
Book Details
Format: 
Hardcover, 368 pages
Publication Date: 
March 2010
ISBN: 
9780262013888
Category: 
Theory/Criticism
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

Rethinking Curating explores the characteristics distinctive to new media art, including its immateriality and its questioning of time and space, and relates them to such contemporary art forms as video art, conceptual art, socially engaged art, and performance art. The authors, both of whom have extensive experience as curators, offer numerous examples of artworks and exhibitions to illustrate how the roles of curators and audiences can be redefined in light of new media art's characteristics. They discuss modes of curating, from the familiar default mode of the museum, through parallels with publishing, broadcasting, festivals, and labs, to more recent hybrid ways of working online and off, including collaboration and social networking. Rethinking Curating offers curators a route through the hype around platforms and autonomous zones by following the lead of current artists' practice.

 

southern california, dirty water, dying fish, dying bees, desert squatters, military wastelands, trash. Toxic Imperial Valley from vbs.tv

 
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Based on Actual Event (2003)

Three-channel video installation

Reynold Reynolds's three-channel video installation, Based on an Actual Event, looks at the fictional portrayal of American military forces in 20th century war. While each film simulates an actual event, each new war simulates previous wars as shown in popular films. Conceptions of war become reality through the depiction of war as entertainment.

Reynolds is a filmmaker living and working in New York City. His films have been screened at the Sundance, Rotterdam and New York Film Festivals, among others. He received an MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts, New York, and has studied film and physics at the University of Colorado, Bould

Project Created: 
March 2003
 
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Reynold Reynolds initially studied physics receiving a bachelor's degree under the professorship of Carl Wieman (Physics Nobel Laureate 2001). Changing his focus to studio art he remained two more years in Boulder to study under experimental film maker Stan Brakhage. Reynolds then finished an M.F.A. in New York City at the School of Visual Arts.

Influenced early on by philosophy and working primarily with 16mm and Super 8mm film as an art medium he has developed a common film grammar based on transformation, consumption and decay. Reynolds' depictions frequent disturbed psychological and physical themes, increasingly provoking the viewer's participation and dismay.

Eyebeam CV
2003FResident
SResident
 
Tags: video, Film
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The goal of Videoplace was not to create an art work that happened to be interactive, but to raise interactivity itself to the level of an art medium. This required redefining the human interface so that the system perceived the movements of participants' bodies rather than receiving commands from them via traditional input devices. Upon enter the "Videoplace" installation, visitors are confronted with their own images projected into a simple graphic scene in which everthing that occurs is a response to their actions.

Visitors can interact with 25 different programs or interaction patterns. A switch from one program to another usually takes place when a new person steps in front of the camera. The end goal is to develop a program capable of learning independently.

 

Project Created: 
March 2004
 
People: Myron Krueger, Katrin Hinrichsen
Project Type: Exhibited Project
Tags: Prix Selection, video, interactive
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Think of the people now is a Commodore Amiga hyper-media computer programme, based on the theme of a media reported event from the 1990 Remembrance Ceremony in Whitehall, London. A young man ran out from the crowd and set fire to himself and shouted the words "think about the people now" in protest against the ceremony. The media account that followed discussed the event in extreme trivial terms, failing to report anything but minor details and accounting only for the stress felt by the Royal Family and Politicians present. The Amiga hyper-media programme recreates the event through the media reports, trivializing and critiquing the British press. This work was produced as part of the final MFA degree show for The University of Reading in 1991. It was awarded the Golden Nica Award Prix Ars Electronica that year. Think of the people now was exhibited at Eyebeam Atelier as part of the Prix Selection Exhibition.

Project Created: 
March 2004
 
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n-cha(n)t is an audio visual installation that allows participants to eavesdrop on or infiltrate the conversational patterns of a networked community of computers.  Inspiration for the work came from a strong and somewhat inexplicable desire to hear a community of computers speaking together: chattering amongst themselves, musing, intoning chants.  n-cha(n)t was exhibited as part of Prix Selection at Eyebeam Atelier.

Project Created: 
March 2004
 
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Bondage is a piece about enigma drawing on mystery and fantasy. It is digital in nature, but analog on the surface. The artist uses wood and paper as a vehicle for digital image and sound projecting a Japanese woman in a kimono onto a sliding paper shoji screen. The sounds are sine-waves, but not in a typical ultra-clean design space. The viewer’s presence completes the loop, uncovering parts of Nobuyoshi Araki’s original photograph, scanned left to right in frequency bands producing sound. The quadraphonic sound system is oriented vertically in the plane of the paper screen. The fibers of the paper give an organic surface for the digital pixels. The result is a total environment, a concentrated space where sound meets image, but where interaction is not pushed to the fore. Instead, he attempts to create a magical space, drawing upon the voyeuristic fantasies of the viewer.

Project Created: 
March 2003
 
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Steina plays the violin,the video, and is the performer so that in intermediary ways the observer and the observed converge. The languages of the two media, music and video, are interconnected according to their abstractness where the sound creates the waveforms of the image. Music is visually explored as a medium developing temporal and spatial features: not only does the sound spread the scan lines so that they become horizontally visible thereby exploring temporal dimensionality, but Steina also uses the Scan Processor to modulate the soundwaves until they build up spatial forms of the image. Through the Scan Processor, brighter parts of the "image" are lifted so that the horizontal lines also vertically deflect and create sculptural pattern. This work was exhibited as part of the What Sound Does a Color Make? exhibition at Eyebeam Atelier.

Project Created: 
March 2003
 
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