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Here’s a pretty cool project done with the Lego NXT system. It’s a robot that will draw you a picture. Yes, we know it could be done cnc style, but this is much more fun. You load a picture into the software, adjust the levels so the software can create the vector version more easily, then let it rip. Now they need to add face recognition.

 
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The blogger at What I'm Seeing is a prolific photographer of San Francisco's rapid transit system, and thus has fallen afoul of its imaginary no-photos policy, with a threatened arrest:

 
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Douglas Rushkoff, the author of Life Inc., is a guest blogger.

Here's Patrick Dixon, of Siemens, advertising as features all the things about RFID tags that I always thought should bother people the most. The first time I watched this, I figured it was The Yes Men having one over on the Ascent Business Leadership Forum.

 
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diyled

Ever wanted to make your own LED? You might be tempted to after reading how easy it is. No, this won’t really be a practical LED that you would use to light a project, but it is very cool anyway. [Michael] picked up a box of Moissanite, or Silicon Carbide, on eBay for roughly $1. Making the LED is as easy as putting your positive lead to the crystal and touching it with a sewing needle attached to a negative lead. He has tips on how to get the best results as well as a little bit of history of LEDs on the site.

[thanks Andreas]

 
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[dunk] sent his home made Radio Control system. It is constructed from a Playstation 2 controller, an Atmega 2561, microcontroller, some RF modules and various servos and motors. It seems to work pretty well. You can get all the schematics and source code on his site. Several people have submitted a similar project which involves an iPhone and a helicopter, but that one is a bit dubious, mainly due to it’s lack of detail.

 
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Steve Lambert solo show walkthrough from Steve Lambert on Vimeo.

Steve says: “Release early, often, and with a Dub track from 1971″ See more install shots at visitsteve.com

 
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Photo (CC) Becky Stern, also of MAKE / Craft.

Calling Nam Jun Paik a video art pioneer would be too narrow to describe his impact. In exploding the idea of what television and television processing could be in his art, he helped create a conceptual revolution that cleared the path for today’s ubiquitous and always-dynamic screens. But to really understand that work, you might want to delve into the theory of cybernetics, for the same reasons that can help understand early, radical electronic music and the path we’re on today.

 
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wiredup_t

We wouldn’t want to let a week slip by without something new being made to twitter would we?  This time it is a toilet. Don’t worry, they are sparing us the graphic details, it pretty much tweets every time it is flushed. As you can see in the picture above, they’re using an Arduino for the toilet/PC connection. If you really want to make something twitter, this might be a good starting point. It’s basically twittering every time a button is pushed. You can download the source code on the site as well as find a tutorial on Arduino basics.

[via astera]

 
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A little grid more

Carsten Nicolai is one of the most renowned artists working at the intersection of art and science and infamous for his minimalist approach.



Having exhibited internationally at Documenta X and the Venice Biennale, he is also an active musician working under his music alias Alva Noto and has staged performances with Ryuichi Sakamoto at the Guggenheim NY to the Centre Pompidou in Paris.



This week, Gestalten is releasing his new book Grid Index, the first comprehensive visual lexicon of patterns and grid systems. A reference book for designers, visual artists, architects, researchers, musicians and mathematicians, Nicolai has discovered and unlocked the visual code for visual systems into a systematic equation of grids and patterns. We met Carsten in his studio in Berlin Mitte to talk about grids, books and music.