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Toby Barnes at Mudlark has developed Chromaroma, an online multiplayer game played out as you travel the London Underground.

Chromaroma is a game that shows you your movements and location as you swipe your Oyster Card in and out of the Tube.

It connects communities of people who cross paths and routes on a regular basis, and encourages people to make new journeys and use public transport in a different way by exploring new areas and potentially using different modes of public transport.

 
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Details on the New Mobilities theme at FutureEverything 2011 will be announced here soon.

 
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Just opened in NYC at the Center for Architecture, Our Cities Ourselves is an international traveling exhibition on the future of transport in ten major cities. It challenges 10 leading architects to envision 10 cities in 2030 centred around safe and enjoyable walking cycling and public transit.

 
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The Bogotá Car Free Day has been a massive inspiration to people around the world, taking cars off the street and freeing up the city.

Currently Bogotá holds the world's largest car-free weekday event covering the entire city. The first car-free day was held in February 2000 and became institutionalised through a public referendum

 
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I have a university post at ImaginationLancaster, and the lab is a lead partner in all FutureEverything projects, including New Mobilities.

ImaginationLancaster is an open and exploratory research lab at Lancaster University that engages in multi-disciplinary, innovative projects related to people, places, products and systems.

 
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The Centre for Mobilties Research (CeMoRe) at Lancaster University is developing with us the New Mobilities theme for FutureEverything 2011. CeMoRe studies and researches the newly emerging interdisciplinary field of 'mobilities': the large-scale movements of people, objects, capital, and information across the world.

 
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plan b are artists Sophia New and Daniel Belasco Rogers. They often work with GPS, and created you, me and everywhere we go by tracking everywhere they traveled for a year and displaying the results.

you, me and everywhere we go (2008)

As part of Recoded, an exhibition at Peacock Visual Arts and conference at the Centre for Modern Thought, we showed some results of a whole year of tracking ourselves with GPSs. This was in the form of two large prints of Berlin showing the subtle differences and an animation made for us by Andreas Schlegel showing how our paths overlapped and differed during the year

 
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In our impact trial of OurTravel at FutureEverything 2011, we want to look at how people who take regular journeys together can create ‘social travel communities’. This has similarities to the Familiar Stranger project by Eric Paulos and Elizabeth Goodman, which was interested in how we can connect with mobile media with individuals that we regularly observe but do not interact with, on public transport or in other public places.

 
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mCenter, the Mobilities Research and Policy Center, at Drexel will I hope be involved in New Mobilities, and have kindly invited me over to Philly this Friday to give a talk.

Mobilities Visiting Speaker “FutureEverything – New Mobilities” Talk by Drew Hemment Founder of the FutureEverything Festival and Associate Director of ImaginationLancaster Friday, 16 July 2010: 5:30-7:00 pm @ NextFab Studio: 3711 Market Street, Philadelphia on the campus of the University City Science Center PLEASE RSVP: http://futureeverything.eventbrite.com FutureEverything is an art, technology and social innovation organization [...]

 
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The Centre for Mobilties Research (CeMoRe) at Lancaster University is developing with us the New Mobilities theme for FutureEverything 2011. CeMoRe studies and researches the newly emerging interdisciplinary field of 'mobilities': the large-scale movements of people, objects, capital, and information across the world.

The UK Telegraph has a post on how researchers think they will have a car on the road next year that can be driven by blind people. Although it uses nonvisual interfaces you have to ask yourself - would this be suitable for fast-reaction driving in such cities as London, New York, Istanbul, etc?? It's one thing to have developed the technology, its quite another to put it into real-time practice in some of the most difficult circumstances. Read on: