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The Tweetagraph uses an Arduino to capture the dots and dashes created by the telegraph. The Ardruino itself is running Firmata (now comes as a built in library with the arduino software) so that it can talk to Processing. The Processing sketch is using the java library twitter4j which handles the communication with the Twitter API.

Project by Joe McKay of Beacon NY

 
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Why the Internet Is a Great Tool for Totalitarians

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Princeton study shows that easy fonts make things harder to remember

By Tim Stevens posted Jan 17th 2011 3:24PM
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eCLOUD from Dan Goods on Vimeo.

 
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Evolving from graffiti and street art, urban interventions are the next generation of artwork to hit public space. Using any and all of the components that make up urban and rural landscapes, these mostly spatial interventions bring art to the masses. They turn the street into a studio, laboratory, club, and gallery. Modified traffic signs, swings at bus stops, and images created out of sand or snow challenge us to rediscover our environment and interact with it in new ways. The work is an intelligent and critical commentary on the planning, use, and commercialization of public space.

 
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Twitter Dialects

Microbloggers may think they're interacting in one big Twitterverse.
But researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science find regional slang is as common in tweets as conversations.
Postings on Twitter reflect some well-known regionalisms: Southerners' "y'all," and Pittsburghers' "yinz." There are also the usual regional divides in references to soda, pop and Coke.
Jacob Eisenstein, a post-doctoral fellow in CMU's Machine Learning Department, says more are evolving within the medium.
It shows in the automated method he and colleagues developed for analyzing Twitter word use.
In northern California, something cool is "koo." In southern California, it's "coo." In many cities, something is "sumthin," New York City tweeters favor "suttin."

 
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That’s it. We’re putting a wrap on 2010. We’ll hit the ground running again on Monday. But, until then, we leave you with a handy list of our favorite and most popular posts from 2010, all ordered in a rather random way. If you crave a little more Open Culture goodies, you can always browse through our complete archive here, and follow us on TwitterFacebook, and RSS. Hope you have a safe, happy and prosperous New Year!

 
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hole-in-wall.jpg

(photo credit)

Sugata Mitra tells us that there are places on Earth, in every country where, for various reasons, good schools cannot be built and good teachers cannot or do not want to go. And those places, as it turns out, is often where trouble comes from.

 
Tags: education
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Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education — the best teachers and schools don’t exist where they’re needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching. (Recorded at TEDGlobal 2010, July 2010 in Oxford, UK. Duration: 17:14)

Watch Sugata Mitra’s talk on TED.com where you can download it, rate it, comment on it and find other talks and performances from our archive of 700+ TEDTalks.

 
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Audiovisual technology has returned to spectacle. Artists are armed with new technologies for fusing space and image, sound and sight. What they tend not to have is permanent spaces. And that lack of venues has made audiovisual artists nomadic and provisional, constrained to hastily-provisioned, rectangular, sometimes dim projections. In short, for revolutions to happen, you do need special venues, not just special artists.