Eyebeam 15th Anniversary

Since 1997, Eyebeam has supported the most cutting-edge artists and creative technologists in the world. Through the continuous and sustained direct support of artistic engineers, engineering artists, brilliant thinkers and tinkerers, as well as a few robots, Eyebeam supports ideas and tools that help us make our way through the world. 

 In 2012, we celebrate where we have been and where we are going with a focus on supporting projects by the amazing artists and technologists that have worked at Eyebeam in the past, keeping an eye towards the future.

 
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Eyebeam is holding a party on June 5, to kick-off our Kickstarter Campaign, RSVP here!!   The goal of the campaign is to create a new, more public entrance into Eyebeam that will give us a multi-use exhibition and presentation space in addition to a bookstore. To get the campaign rolling in proper Eyebeam fashion, join us for a party the night of June 5, 6 - 8, with the first screening of our Kickstarter video, drinks by donation, and a wide variety of rewards for Kickstarter donations at all levels, including:
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Eyebeam is pleased to announce Found, the first program in a new screening series curated from our archives, organized around themes that have united artists working here over our 15 year history.  Found compiles four films made by Eyebeam artists working with found and appropriated images, a mainstay of video art in the 21st century and an outgrowth of Eyebeam’s philosophy of free and open culture. The 50-minute program includes short works by Fred Wilson, Christian Marclay, Rashaad Newsome and Jacob Ciocci. The program will premier on Wednesday, April 25th with a free public screening at 8:30 pm.  Beginning on April 26 it will be screened between 12 noon and 6 pm in our theater space at 540 W. 21 St..  Curator:  James O’Shea.  The four films in the program are:
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On April 12 from 6PM–8PM, Eyebeam will host the official US 'The Speed Book' launch party of Aram Bartholl's first artist monograph. The event, which occurs in tandem with eteam's project launch, will feature:
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Opening Reception: Wednesday, March 21, 5:30PM - 7:30PM. Half a century since its abandonment, North Brother Island fades from New York City's map as nature swallows this one block square quarantine city. Just down the East River, Ward's Island warehouses shelter New York's homeless and mentally ill in a dozen immense buildings clustered under the Triborough Bridge.
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Through an eBay purchase, eteam (a collaboration between Franziska Lamprecht and Hajoe Moderegger) became the landlords of a 36,000-square-foot plot of land in Germany with eight remaining tenants and seven feral lots. After receiving complaints from their tenants about the lack of access to water, eteam suggested they dig a well. When the tenants rejected this idea, eteam decided to search for water in different ways, using this exploration as both a motif and a vehicle for motion and creation. How do you look at the field as water? How do you produce water? And how do you make it visible? eteam sought to change people’s perspectives of the land. Do you still complain about the lack of water if you have the ocean around you? "If the dancing gets too stiff…" is a five-channel video installation that shows snippets from this social, mental, and metaphysical experiment. "If the dancing gets too stiff…" is also part of eteam's larger project OS GRABELAND.
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Jordan Crandall's Unmanned is a piece of "philosophical theater": a blend of performance art, political allegory, philosophical speculation, and intimate reverie that explores the changing nature of masculinity in the face of automated technologies of war. Jordan conducts a series of monologues in the guise of seven different characters, supplemented with stage action, video, and sound. Each character is an archetype of masculine identity struggling with its own agency and role in the field of deployment -- historically, the most complex issue in the field of military endeavor.
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This is a monthly game testing event for independent game developers and enthusiasts run by former fellow Kaho Abe and Come Out and Play. The focus will be on play-testing, open dialogue and discussion around games in development. This monthly meeting is a great opportunity for game developers to get valuable feedback for projects in progress. For game enthusiasts, these events are a place to learn more about the game development process, techniques and systems behind games. The goal of these monthly meetings is not only to encourage and nurture the development of high quality games through testing and discussion, but also to create opportunities for game testers, players and enthusiasts to become more engaged and active in the game development community.