OK, back on theme: 3 of 9: PUBLIC/ PARTICIPATORY ART AS

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OK, back on theme: 3 of 9: PUBLIC/ PARTICIPATORY ART AS INVERVENTION

Krzysztof Wodiczko worked with homeless people to design the perfect homeless shopping cart.

 

Fritz Haeg worked with homeowners to turn their lawns into little farms.

Daniel Martinez blocked off a heavily trafficked section of Cornell University's campus a la Paris 1968.

 

Steinbrenner-Dempf covered every advert on a street in Vienna with bright solid yellow.

 

Hewlett and Kinsley staged a series of tableaux along Sampsonia Way in Pittsburgh's Northside in collaboration with Google Streetview.

 

Mary Coble posed statue-like on a street, inviting passers-by to mark her body with epithets they'd been called or heard used against others.

Enabling, blocking, manipulating, collaborating... In these works, as we move from appropriation to intervention, we really begin to see the artists take control of an existing situation. By creating machines, working directly with participants to create new uses, actively blocking participants daily habits, or inserting new elements, hurdles, or tasks into the everyday, there is a sense of working both with and against the participants.