Day 3 and 4

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Saturday: September 18

Today was yet another busy day, with the Green Prix, workshops, and performances.  I spent most of my time in performances today.

I began my day with voicing my opinion at the Trading Voices booth.  We had a choice to “speak” or “re-speak”, and the questions were about gender equality/inequality.  I decided to “re-speak” which was state another person’s opinion as my own to trade a voice and add confusion in opinions.  I thought it was cool to play a part that I was not, and act a little bit.

Next I went to my first performance of the day.  I went to O+A Requiem for Fossil Fuels, which was an orchestra of digital sounds and sonic voices.  There were about 5 people, and the composer circled around a podium.  The singers sang high and low notes beautifully, and chanted while there were sounds of traffic, horns, buses, footsteps, sirens and more in the background.  At first I wasn’t sure what to think of this combination.  After listening to it for a while I began to like the mix of the human voices with the sounds of man and machine-made sounds supporting the voices.

Right after, was the Zoe Keating and Robert Hodgins performance at South Hall.  I had been looking forward to this for a while, as I knew that Zoe Keating was an established cello musician and Robert Hodgins was a talented flash animation artist.  Zoe Keating played 5 pieces.  In the beginning of every piece, she would state her inspiration and speak a little bit about what the piece will entail.  I really appreciated that, because she received an inspiration and put it to use, rather than put together pieces of music randomly.  She is a true artist.  Once she started playing I could not take my eyes off of her.  She absorbed me fully, and I sat there awestruck at how amazingly she played the cello, and how precise she was with her loops.  I thought to myself: she is a true musical genius.  How did she know that a certain loop will sound good with another loop?  It was amazing to see her work.  After her pieces, her last piece was with Robert Hodgins visual.  I was a little skeptical only because I loved Zoe’s cello all by itself and was afraid that a visual will take the beauty out of it.  When the visuals started coming in, it did not take away from the beauty, it added to it.  The cello and the visuals were perfectly in sync and the vibrations, long notes and short notes were all seen in the visuals.  At the end, everyone clapped so much that she played an encore piece.  It was the best performance I had seen throughout the entire biennial.

At the end, there was a reception/party.  I enjoyed some food, and had a wonderful time with friends.  It was the end of a great day, and was a great time to celebrate.

Today was a wonderful day, and the highlight of my day was Zoe Keating.  I think I will be listening to more of her songs to be inspired while I am creating artwork.









Sunday: September 19

The last day of the Biennial, and the least hectic day.

Today I played “Blast Theory”, which is a game engaging a person, a machine and a phone.  I received a call about an hour before my summons time, asking me if this was the phone I would be using.  I said yes.  It told me to meet at a certain place in San Jose and from there on, it gave me a series of instructions.  It was a little weird at first because a machine was giving me instructions.  Geographically, it knew everything.  It told me to wait under an awning and meet up with a partner.  There was no partner to greet me so I continued alone.  I can’t say everything it told me to do, but I will say at one point it told me to devise a plan to rob a bank!  It was a pretty interesting experience.

Afterward, I went straight to South Hall to see Dark Dark Dark play.  There were a cool Indie band with some nice tunes.  They also already had a great fan base, and played the theme song of the film screening to follow after.

Today was a short day, and I was still exhausted from the weekend.  All in all, it was a great four days.

-Shilpi

 
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