reBlog

Current Reblogger: Chloë Bass

Chloë Bass is an artist, curator and community organizer based in Brooklyn. She is the co-lead organizer for Arts in Bushwick (artsinbushwick.org), which produces the ever-sprawling Bushwick Open Studios, BETA Spaces, and performance festival SITE Fest, which she founded. Recent artistic work has been seen at SCOPE Art Fair, CultureFix, the Bushwick Starr Theater, Figment, and The Last Supper Art Festival, as well as in and around the public spaces of New York City. She has guest lectured at Parsons, the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, and Brooklyn College. Other moments have found her co-cheffing Umami: People + Food, a 90 person private supper club; growing plants with Boswyck Farms (boswyckfarms.org); and curating with architecture gallery SUPERFRONT (superfront.org). Chloë holds a BA in Theater Studies from Yale University, and an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media Arts (PIMA) from Brooklyn College.

http://chloebass.wordpress.com


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Cut and Paste is a kinetic sculpture. It was Stefan Schwabes final project at the Aix-en-Provence art school. Starting with a stack of white papers (A4) he created a mechanism wich permitts each sheet of paper one by one to take a lovely flight and to build up a new stack that way. If you do cut and paste on Microsoft Windows you may contemplate the nice metaphor of a flying sheet of paper that accompanies the digital file transfer process.
Complete documentation here :
http://www.ecole-art-aix.fr/article3710.html
Find more interesting works on his vimeo :
http://vimeo.com/user1567360/videos

 
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Thanks so much, Drew, for the New Mobilities reblog session. We're turning over the reblog now to our new French Connection, Arash Nassiri. Arash is interning with the program team and working with several of our artists over the summer. He is an artist studying in the Visual Communications program at University of the Arts, Berlin.

ReBlogged by: 
Roddy Schrock
 
People: Arash Nassiri
Tags: intern
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A Machine To See With - Blast Theory's new project for 2010 01SJ Biennial.

A Machine To See With is a work for pedestrians and their mobile phones and puts participants inside a movie as they walk through the city.

 
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OutRun - Garnet Hertz

An arcade game you can actually drive.

The car-shaped sit-down arcade cabinet of OutRun is converted into a small car that can drive.


This project attempts to combine the real world and OutRun, an arcade driving game released by Sega in 1986.

 
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Couldn't resist...

An elderly man on the M20 near the Channel Tunnel entrance in a mobility scooter in April last year

A 91-year-old was well and truly in
the slow lane when he found himself on the A2 in a mobility
scooter.

The pensioner was spotted on the busy dual carriageway near
Dartford Heath travelling just a few miles per hour as other
vehicles roared past him.

 
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The live train map for the London Underground is a nearly real-time Google Maps mashup that shows the various trains of the London Underground as they move about their subterranean travels.

The train map, created by Matthew Somerville, takes data from the Transport for London API and plots it out on a Google Map. On it, yellow pinpoints represent train stations, and the plethora of slowly moving red pinpoints represent an army of trains. Clicking on a red pin identifies which train you're looking at, the station it just left and where and when it is expected to arrive.

rtw-london-train-map.JPG

 
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Christian Nold created one of the most celebrated locative media projects which combines galvanic skin response with GPS data as you walk through the city to create 'emotion maps.'

His current project is not about mobility in this sense, and is not locative media, but it is about mobility of currency and international money exchange for migrant peoples.

The Bijlmer Euro is a complimentary local currency for South East of Amsterdam which creates economic benefits for local people, inspires social connections and builds a complex network identity for the Bijlmer. There are 2000 Bijlmer Euro notes that can be used at 17 participating local shops to get special discounts.

 
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Blimps could replace aircraft in freight transport, say scientists
Helium-powered ships could be carrying freight – and even passengers – in as little as a decade's time

airship freight carrier : CL160 from German company CargoLifter
An example of the future of airship freight carrier by German company CargoLifter. Blimps could replace aircraft in a decade. Photograph: cargolifter.com

Fresh fruit, vegetables, flowers and other foreign luxuries could be part of a global revolution by carrying cargo around the world in airships instead of planes, one of the UK's leading scientists has predicted.

 
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Transport is not an obvious choice for a festival theme. And transport is not easy to hack, as transport infrastructure is such large scale and can take decades to build. This makes it more of a challenge, and in a way more interesting, to run a living art lab on new mobilities.

In 2009, I did a day long workshop with the UK Government's Department of Transport and friends at the Centre for Mobilities Research at Lancaster University, where I spoke on using art-design interventions to create new perspectives on transport, as a part of a Digital Economies workshop.

 
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The DISTANCE festival in London took place 19th - 20th June 2010 at Stoke Newington International Airport. It was two days of art and performance featuring 40 artists, scientists and thinkers crossing borders and disciplines to interrogate the multiple perspectives of distance.

http://www.fromadistance.co.uk

Distance has always been a part of our lives. Now, more than ever, we are expected to negotiate the complexities of near and far. From conquistador to ryanair to Skype to pilgrimage to chatroom to your neighbour's front door, a multitude of choices now affect how we experience and engage with people and places across the world and across the street. As technology offers instant presence and lifestyle choices increase in complexity, what are our relationships to distance? How do we live with absence, intimacy and speed? When do we desire to close the gap and when do we need to create it?

 
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