reBlog

Current Reblogger: Chloë Bass

Chloë Bass is an artist, curator and community organizer based in Brooklyn. She is the co-lead organizer for Arts in Bushwick (artsinbushwick.org), which produces the ever-sprawling Bushwick Open Studios, BETA Spaces, and performance festival SITE Fest, which she founded. Recent artistic work has been seen at SCOPE Art Fair, CultureFix, the Bushwick Starr Theater, Figment, and The Last Supper Art Festival, as well as in and around the public spaces of New York City. She has guest lectured at Parsons, the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, and Brooklyn College. Other moments have found her co-cheffing Umami: People + Food, a 90 person private supper club; growing plants with Boswyck Farms (boswyckfarms.org); and curating with architecture gallery SUPERFRONT (superfront.org). Chloë holds a BA in Theater Studies from Yale University, and an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media Arts (PIMA) from Brooklyn College.

http://chloebass.wordpress.com


Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


I have a university post at ImaginationLancaster, and the lab is a lead partner in all FutureEverything projects, including New Mobilities.

ImaginationLancaster is an open and exploratory research lab at Lancaster University that engages in multi-disciplinary, innovative projects related to people, places, products and systems.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


Christopher Osbourne spoke at FutureEverything last May and showed some of the incredible transport data visualisations he has been doing at ITO.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


plan b are artists Sophia New and Daniel Belasco Rogers. They often work with GPS, and created you, me and everywhere we go by tracking everywhere they traveled for a year and displaying the results.

you, me and everywhere we go (2008)

As part of Recoded, an exhibition at Peacock Visual Arts and conference at the Centre for Modern Thought, we showed some results of a whole year of tracking ourselves with GPSs. This was in the form of two large prints of Berlin showing the subtle differences and an animation made for us by Andreas Schlegel showing how our paths overlapped and differed during the year

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


The Centre for Mobilties Research (CeMoRe) at Lancaster University is developing with us the New Mobilities theme for FutureEverything 2011. CeMoRe studies and researches the newly emerging interdisciplinary field of 'mobilities': the large-scale movements of people, objects, capital, and information across the world.

The UK Telegraph has a post on how researchers think they will have a car on the road next year that can be driven by blind people. Although it uses nonvisual interfaces you have to ask yourself - would this be suitable for fast-reaction driving in such cities as London, New York, Istanbul, etc?? It's one thing to have developed the technology, its quite another to put it into real-time practice in some of the most difficult circumstances. Read on:



The National Federation of the Blind and Virginia Tech say they hope to demonstrate a prototype equipped with technology that helps a sightless person to get behind the wheel in 2011.The technology, called nonvisual interfaces, will guide its driver through traffic by transmitting information about nearby vehicles or objects.
 
Vibrating gloves or streams of compressed air directed behind the wheel are among the options for communicating the information needed to avoid collisions and reach a destination.Advocates for the blind describe the scheme as a "moon shot," drawing parallels with President John F. Kennedy's pledge to land a man on the moon."We're exploring areas that have previously been regarded as unexplorable," said Dr. Mark Maurer, president of the National Federation of the Blind. "We're moving away from the theory that blindness ends the capacity of human beings to make contributions to society." 

Mr Maurer first came up with the idea that the blind could drive about a decade ago when he launched the organisation's research institute. "Some people thought I was crazy, and they thought, 'Why do you want us to raise money for something that can't be done?' Others thought it was a great idea," Mr Maurer said. "Some people were incredulous. Others thought the idea was incredible."



Read original post at - 'Car for blind drivers under development'

-

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


mCenter, the Mobilities Research and Policy Center, at Drexel will I hope be involved in New Mobilities, and have kindly invited me over to Philly this Friday to give a talk.

Mobilities Visiting Speaker “FutureEverything – New Mobilities” Talk by Drew Hemment Founder of the FutureEverything Festival and Associate Director of ImaginationLancaster Friday, 16 July 2010: 5:30-7:00 pm @ NextFab Studio: 3711 Market Street, Philadelphia on the campus of the University City Science Center PLEASE RSVP: http://futureeverything.eventbrite.com FutureEverything is an art, technology and social innovation organization [...]

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


Toby Barnes at Mudlark presented Chromaroma at FutureEverything 2010 - Chromaroma is an online multiplayer game played out as you travel the London Underground with your Oyster Card www.chromaroma.com.

NebLast week I was on a panel at Future Everything discussing open data, data visualisations and Chromaroma.  I have embedded my talk below. A lot of the talks were either way too academic, political or “artistically led” for my palette, but the highlight was an inspiring presentation by Ben Cerveny (VURB & Stamen advisor). I have written up notes on @neb’s talk for what they are worth and posted on the chromaroma site here:

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


Christopher Osbourne is doing some fantastic data vis on transport, here has some thoughts to share on OSM.

At the rapidly approaching State of the Map 2010, I will be hosting a potentially controversial panel on the subject “What’s wrong with OpenStreetMap?”

A slightly risque look at the areas we think OSM is getting it wrong, and getting it right too of course. SotM is a big celebration of all things OSM, but there is a need to highlight issues that the community, the OSMF, and local chapters, should address.

With the geo world now all paying attention to OSM, just look at the sponsor list for this year, there are big challenges coming up – keeping community cohesion as OSM membership growth continues, the ‘IBM Moment’ – is OSM ready for a big commercial donation, how do we secure lasting funding for OSM, what on earth is going on with the licence, do we need paid staff like Wikipedia… etc etc

I’m looking for some questions to put to the panelists, so this is your chance to tell me “What’s wrong with OpenStreetMap?”

Share/Bookmark

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

It is not online yet, but one project that will be presented at FutureEverything 2011 is OurTravel. This mobile app enables people to create and share their own travel information with other travellers, and to create ‘social travel communities’ based on the journeys they take. It has been developed by computer scientists at InfoLab21 at Lancaster University, and the aim is to run an impact trial during the festival. Some of the things we want to look at are how can you create communities based on a shared journey, and does it change travel patterns, by leading to ride sharing, or more people on public transport.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam


New Mobilities will be one of the themes at FutureEverything 2011, and here you can read how we use the festival as a living lab or play space - in 2011 we will be presenting art, design and technology projects on new mobilities and smart transport.

Reflecting on the way the FutureEverything festival transforms the city of Manchester England into a living lab or play space for participatory experiments on art, society and technology.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Roddy says: Thanks so much to Maria del Carmen Montoya for reblogging with us over the last few weeks!! Ghana Think Tank, the project Maria del Carmen made in collaboration with Christopher Robbins and John Ewing is still up as part of our current exhibition, stop by if you haven't yet.

Drew Hemment, new Eyebeam Honorary Resident, will be taking over reblog now, until the 19th of July in the context of New Mobilities. He is looking for existing projects to be included on reblog, plus ideas and proposals for the FutureEverything 2010 festival, a living lab for devising, testing and playing. New Mobilities is a lead theme at FutureEverything 2011 in Manchester England 11-14 May 2011. The New Mobilities reblog session at Eyebeam is a collaboration between Eyebeam, FutureEverything and Lancaster University. Drew Hemment is Director of FutureEverything and Associate Director of ImaginationLancaster at Lancaster University.

ReBlogged by: 
Roddy Schrock
 
Syndicate content