reBlog

Current Reblogger: Chloë Bass

Chloë Bass is an artist, curator and community organizer based in Brooklyn. She is the co-lead organizer for Arts in Bushwick (artsinbushwick.org), which produces the ever-sprawling Bushwick Open Studios, BETA Spaces, and performance festival SITE Fest, which she founded. Recent artistic work has been seen at SCOPE Art Fair, CultureFix, the Bushwick Starr Theater, Figment, and The Last Supper Art Festival, as well as in and around the public spaces of New York City. She has guest lectured at Parsons, the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, and Brooklyn College. Other moments have found her co-cheffing Umami: People + Food, a 90 person private supper club; growing plants with Boswyck Farms (boswyckfarms.org); and curating with architecture gallery SUPERFRONT (superfront.org). Chloë holds a BA in Theater Studies from Yale University, and an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media Arts (PIMA) from Brooklyn College.

http://chloebass.wordpress.com


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Just as Helen of Troy's face launched a thousand ships, so one might say Google Maps is inspiring the launch of a thousand new applications. Case in point: Tokyo Jogging, a new mashup of Wii technology and Google Maps that allows users to take a virtual jog through the streets of Tokyo.

Created by software engineer Ryo Katsuma, Tokyo Jogging functions much like Wii Sports Jogging. Users begin by downloading free server software from the site. They then connect their Wiimote to Google Maps' Street View, and hold the Wiimote while jogging in place in front of their computer. Google's Street View guides them along the streets of Tokyo, giving the impression of a brisk jog through the city. A video demonstrates the application in action.

There once was a day where online was on, offline was off, and never the twain did meet. Those days are gone! Today OFF=ON and ON=OFF, as our sister site likes to say, and riches await those who can make the most of the intersection. Read up, be inspired, and start some mashing up of your own! (Related: Online game focuses on real-world kindness.)

Website: www.tokyo-jogging.com
Contact: katsuma@gmail.com

Spotted by: Raymond Kollau

 
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The Hardcore Continuum? A discussion

  • Published 07/04/09 Special Events
  • Event: 29/04/09
  • Location: East London, United Kingdom
  • Sponsored by The Wire
  • Links: UEL
Image: hcc_banner
The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at University of East London in association with The Wire is hosting a discussion surrounding Simon Reynolds's Hardcore Continuum idea of a thread leading through the evolution of UK dancefloor music from the breakbeat hardcore matrix of the early 1990s.
Speakers are: Mark Fisher (K-Punk), Alex Williams (Splintering Bone Ashes), Steve Goodman (Kode 9), Lisa Blanning, Dan Hancox (Guardian, New Statesman), Joe Muggs, Jeremy Gilbert (Co-author of Discographies) and Kodwo Eshun. London UEL Docklands Campus (Cyprus DLR), 29 April, 2-6PM. Free but pre-registration is recommended. More info? email: J.Gilbert@uel.ac.uk or click here.
 
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Baker Tweets

Baker Tweet is a new online service which allows London bakeries to tweet when their bread and pastries are fresh from the oven. Poke London a digital creative agency, are setting up various London bakeries with custom-built ingenious contraptions that harnesses the power of the internet to deliver up-to-the-minute baking news flashes via Twitter... mmm... fresh doughnuts!:



The first BakerTweet device has been installed at the Albion Cafe on Boundary Street in Shoreditch, London (across the road from Poke!). To find out what's cooking follow @albionsoven on Twitter

 
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Sally's Beautiful Blue Wall

sallyblue1.jpg

sallyblue2.jpg

Yesterday morning, Sara and I went on the The Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC Radio to talk about the role of that street art is playing in the current economic climate. You can listen to it here:

All in all we thought it went pretty well. The debate about street art being nothing more than vandalism quite honestly bores us to death. We were glad that the host, Brian Lehrer, didn't waste the whole show on this subject. (Most radio stations would have done so for sure)

This post on the WNYC message boards is indicative of the lack of understanding out there:

"Your guests (meaning Sara and I) are a complete sham. They should be arrested rather than featured on the air. Come on, do we really want that shit all over the place again? Tell them and their clientele to go get a real job and do the work to become real artists rather than this easy bs these idiots are praising as "free expression". "Humanistic".. Please. Go back to academia. You obviously never left it. There are plenty of ways to get a message across without defacing public property."

And then this morning, we received a wonderful email that, for us, illuminates exactly why the subject of vandalism is so limiting:

From Sally (the artist who did the work on the photos above):

"hello. I heard the show on WNYC. I am glad to hear of your collective. I share much of what you talked about. I have been working on a street art since july of 08. It was sheltered by some trees and cars so that I never got caught. Once the police stopped and yelled "Stop drawing on the wall" I kept a look out and would hide. I am using acrylic ink and a small brush. A friend called it 'slow graffiti' A few months ago someone called the police and 2 squad cars and a black sedan came!! They gave me a warning, said if I was caught again they would arrest me. I did'n't know that graffiti is a felony. so I stopped working on it.

later I called the owner of the construction sight and he finally agreed to give me a letter of permission. It is near my studio, I can see it from my window. It is a wall surrounding a construction sight that is not being constructed. On Bergen between 4th and 3rd Ave. on the corner of Third Ave. in Brooklyn. I started it because they painted the wall blue, and it was a huge expanse and was calling to me. I have a lot of work finished and instead of waiting for someone to allow me to show my work I could take the initiative and show it myself. It is also in a place where lots of people who might never go to a gallery would see it. It is a funny area because it borders park slope and Boerum and the housing project. There is a half way house on Bergen. I love working on it outside, I believe I am adding to the neighborhood, it makes me part of the neighborhood, and people are always stopping to talk to me. I have had many interesting and appreciative comments. I have met a lot of people, it is different from the experience of working alone. Art gives back to people, it feeds the soul,in that way I feel I add to the neighborhood. I know that it wont last but I like the fact that it is about the experience of making it, the conversations I have had, and that all is fleeting any way."

 
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Cloud

[Image: The "permutated cubes" of DesignAct's proposed Singapore Pavilion for the World Expo 2010].

It's Habitat 67 as redesigned by BIG in an era of heavily cantilevered structural glass, by way of Herzon & de Meuron, OMA, and perhaps a kind of aerialized Kengo Kuma, in this recent proposal by Singapore's DesignAct.
Their building, a finalist for the World Expo 2010 Singapore Pavilion, consists of "3866 cubes of modular sizes with varying levels of transparency."
However, it also makes me wonder how far cubist cantilevering might yet go in the next half-decade; push this design away from its oddly bovine form toward genuine abstraction – sheer accumulation as design strategy, with cubes randomly "permutating" into the sky, à la J.G. Ballard's Crystal World – and see what comes next.
Either way, in the design language race du jour, I'm all for cubes and rectilinearity, and against triangular tiling and large-scale webbing effects.
If it's cubes vs. triangles, cubes win.

(Spotted on Bustler).
 
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Recorded delivery: New data retention law

Internet service providers are to keep records of emails and online phone calls under controversial new government regulations that come into force today.

ISPs will be legally obliged to store details of emails and internet telephony for 12 months as a potential tool to aid criminal investigations. Although the content of emails and calls will not be held, ISPs will be asked to record the date, time, duration and recipients of online communications.

The new regulations are contained in an EC directive on data retention that already applies to telecoms providers and is now being extended to ISPs.

The directive was conceived as a response to the London bombings of July 2005, following which the Council of the European Union highlighted "the need to adopt common measures on the retention of telecommunications data".

"Knowing when someone sent an email or made an IP telephony call, and knowing who they emailed or called, is very revealing information - these regulations potentially put that information in the hands of a wide range of public bodies," said Sam Parr, a lawyer specialising in communications at Baker & McKenzie.

Shami Chakrabarti, the director of Liberty, said this was "nowhere near as disproportionate and terrifying" as government plans for a central database of communications information, which she believes poses a greater long-term threat to civil liberties.

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2009 | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

 
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Lecture in Arnhem

Gestalten Architecture editor Lukas Feireiss is going to speak in Arnhem as part of a special lecture on the topics of Spacecraft and Beyond Architecture.



Spacecraft presents projects that meet the changing spatial needs of our modern lifestyles and that are simultaneously expanding our current understanding of architecture. On the one hand, the book features flexible, fleeting structures that only exist for a limited time. On the other hand, Spacecraft focuses on spaces that are used temporarily. Whether vacation homes, urban hideouts, art projects, pavilions or studios, all of the included work is distinguished by a playful, unconventional use of space.



Beyond Architecture is the first publication of its kind to document the creative exploration of architecture and urban propositions in the contemporary arts. The projects collected in this book demonstrate how not only architects and designers but also artists are taking architecture as a starting point for experimentation. They range from performance, installation art and crafted sculptures to architectural models, alternative ideas for living spaces and furniture, as well as illustration, painting, collage and photography. Through stunning photography, visuals and complementary texts, these visionary concepts reveal the hidden creative potential for architecture and urban environments in inventive ways.



The second part of the lecture consists of short presentations (in Dutch) from artist and architects from Arnhem: Oscar Lourens, Rob Voerman, Hans Jungerius, Rob Sweere and Peter Groot. Their work is interesting in relation to the topics of Lukas Feireiss.



Spacecraft Beyond Architecture, Tuesday April 14th 2009 at Showroom Arnhem, Langstraat 20, Arnhem

http://www.casa-arnhem.nl

 
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CB2 baby robot developing social skills

06 Apr 2009

CB2 baby robot --

In the nearly two years since it was first unveiled to the world, the Child-robot with Biomimetic Body, or CB2, has been developing social skills by interacting with humans and watching their facial expressions, according to its creators at Osaka University.

Comprised of robotics engineers, brain specialists, psychologists and other experts, the research team has been teaching the android to think like a baby by having it evaluate facial expressions and classify them into basic categories, such as happiness and sadness.


+ Video of CB2 from June 2007

The 130-centimter (4 ft 4 in) tall, 33-kilogram (73 lb) robot is equipped with eye cameras that record emotional expressions. Designed to learn like an infant, the robot can memorize facial expressions and match them with physical sensations, which it detects via 197 pressure sensors under a suit of soft, silicone skin.

CB2 baby robot --

In addition to watching faces, CB2 has been learning to walk. With 51 pneumatic “muscles,” the little android can now amble through a room more smoothly than it could nearly two years ago, though it still requires the aid of a human.

CB2 baby robot --

Within two years, the researchers hope the robot will gain the intelligence of a two-year-old child and the ability to speak in basic sentences. In the coming decades, the researchers expect to develop a “robo species” that has learning abilities somewhere between those of humans and chimps.

CB2 baby robot --

[Link: AFP]

 
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Footage of Fixed Gear ‘Red Hook’ Race



Although the New York Times did a nice job poetically describing this weekend’s Red Hook Criterium—just read the opener—here’s some excellent video footage of the outlaw fixed gear bike race that shockingly resulted in no injuries for the cyclists involved.

 
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London Police poster mashup

Posted by Cory Doctorow, April 9, 2009 9:17 AM permalink

Rex sez, "In light of the recent footage of police behaviour at the G20, I felt it was time to remix the current UK police poster campaign again. Original photo by David Byrne, as posted on BB by Xeni."

Lash Out and Cover Up(Thanks, Rex!)

 
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