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Current & upcoming shows / talks / workshops
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2017

10.6.-1.10.2017
Skulptur Projekte Münster
LWL-Museum für Kunst und Kultur, Münster

2016

19.3. – 22.5.2016
Regeneration Movement
National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, Taipeih

27.2. – 5.6.2016
Liquid Identities
Lehmbruck Museum, Duisburg

19.-21.2.2016
Unpainted Lab
Kesselhalle, München

14.2. – 17.4.2016
Welcome Wutwut Werther
Kunsttempel, Kassel

23.1. – 12.3.2016
Shifting Optics
Upstream Gallery, Amsterdam

6.1.2016
KILLYOURPHONE
ZKM, Karlsruhe

1.1.-30.6.2016
Visiting Professor
at UCLA Design Media Arts

2015

15.12.2015 – 15.1.2016
RECOMMENDED BY
easy!upsteam gallery, Munich

10.12.2015- 21.2.2016
Follow
Fact, Liverpool

5.12.2015 – 28.2.2016
Wie leben? Zukunftsbilder von Malewitsch bis Fujimoto
Wilhelmhack Museum, Ludwigshafen am Rhein

22.11.2015 – 20.3.2016
i.ch
Vögel Kultur Zentrum, Pfäffikon, Schweiz

 

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Penny Press The Internet
Aram Bartholl, 2015
Installation

Follow, Nov 2015
at FACT Liverpool
Get your souvenir of the Internet! A classic, hand-cranked penny press machine produces elongated coins in four different designs, each a stereotypical icon representing the Internet. At the cost of one British pound and some elbow grease, visitors are invited to destroy a penny and create, in a small ‘performance,’ the Internet as a souvenir token. The @ sign, the globe and the wifi symbol are reminiscent of an earlier Internet era. The Internet is not a place; it has now permeated every aspect of our lives. ‘Penny press the Internet’ historicises the Internet and at the same time questions its current status.

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edition of 50, all four designs with keyring, numbered and signed, available at FACT

picture set on flickr

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untitled-2 (plastic bag)
Aram Bartholl, 2015
size: 50 x 60 cm
material: polyethylene

at
recommended by
group show at easy upstream gallery, Munich
opening December 14, 7 pm

Excited to have been a part of this excellent masterclass in Aarhus

Executions: conversations on code, power & death (version 0.1)
Keynote presenters: Wendy Chun and Geoff Cox
Venue: Aarhus Institute of Advanced Studies (AIAS) | Høegh-Guldbergs Gade 6b, bygning 1630, Aarhus
When: December 3rd and 4th, 2015

This event investigates the cultural, material and political implications of execution. Software permeates our environment. We co-exist in an increasingly datafied present in which algorithms and abstract coded processes execute across different scales, materialising and operating at the micro and macro levels of our actions.
The aim of this event is to open up the concept of execution, both from a particular perspective of code and its execution, and more generally towards a wider discussion in relation to datafied culture and everyday life. How can we understand the affective, embodied, performative, programmed processes of execution in the world today? By gathering together researchers working with diverse artistic practices, we hope to encourage a critical curiosity and engagement with the theme of execution.

(photo by Gottfried Haider)

Respondents: Wendy Chun, Geoff Cox, Christian Ulrik Andersen, Søren Pold and Cornelia Sollfrank

Participants: David Gauthier, Linda Hilfling, Lea Muldtofte Gestelev, Audrey Samson, Winnie Soon, Fran Gallardo, Brian House, Helen Pritchard, Molly Schwartz, Eric Snodgrass, Marie Louise Juul Søndergaard, Magda Tyzlik-Carver

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Wie leben?
Zukunftsbilder von Malewitsch bis Fujimoto
5. Dezember 2015 – 28. Februar 2016

Wilhelm-Hack-Museum Ludwigshafen am Rhein
www.wilhelmhack.museum

http://www.ludwigshafen.de/lebenswert/wie-leben-zukunftsbilder-von-malew...


People have been dealing with concepts and visions for shaping the world of tomorrow since time immemorial. How do we want to live? What kind of housing do we want to live in? How do we want to work? Our society is influenced by visions of the future, in particular those put forward by artists, architects, and scientists. And yet our present is always the future of yesterday, because many of these ideas remain visions, others have been brought to fruition. The exhibition How to Live? Visions of the Future Yesterday and Today at the Wilhelm-Hack-Museum presents designs for the future from the areas of art, architecture and design ranging from the Russian avant-garde to our current digital era, and plots a multifaceted history of the future.

participating artists: Otl Aicher, Josef Albers, Gerd Arntz, Aram Bartholl, Bernd und Hilla Becher, Max Bill, Martin Boyce, Marcel Breuer, Richard Buckminster-Fuller, Lee Bul, Ulrich Burandt, Vincent Callebout, Hussein Chalayan, Charlie Chaplin, Christo, Luigi Colani, Joe Colombo, Constant, Kate Cooper, COOP Himmelb(l)au, Le Corbusier, Karsten Crohn, CUCULA, Chris Cunningham, Björn Dahlem, Guy Debord, Theo van Doesburg, César Domela, Wolfgang Döring, Franz Dutler, Charles und Ray Eames, Hans-Georg Esch, Herbert Falk, Harun Farocki und Antje Ehmann, Luka Fineisen, Hermann Finsterlin, Christine Francis, Sou Fujimoto, Naum Gabo, Hans Rolf Garnich, Gebrüder Lumière, Frank Gehry, Sigfried Gideon, Christoph Girardet, Jean Gorin, Eileen Gray, Walter Gropius, Hans Gugelot, Andreas Gursky, Simon Gush, Haus-Rucker-Co, Pascal Häusermann, Robert Häusser, Paul Hildinger, Ryōji Ikeda, Arata Isozaki, Karl Hans Janke, Pierre Jeanneret, Walter Jonas, Hans von Klier, Frauke Koch-Weser, Rem Koolhaas, Paul Klee, Kisho Kurokawa, Hanns Lack, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Fritz Lang, Hans-Jörg Lannoch, Bart van der Leck, Van Bo Le-Mentzel, Ila Bêka und Louise Lemoine, Hans Lindinger, El Lissitzky, Adolf Luther, Heinz Mack, Kasimir Malewitsch, Enzo Mari, Mathieu Mercier, Marlies Matthis, Bernd Meurer, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Ernst Möckl, Piet Mondrian, László Moholy-Nagy, Lucia Moholy-Nagy, Nicolas Moulin, Hans Nagel, Oskar Nerlinger, Constant Nieuwenhuys, Verner Panton, Charlotte Perriand, Giancarlo Piretti, Davide Quayola, Dieter Rams, Willi Ramstein, Heinz Rasch, Tobias Rehberger, Tejo Remy, Gerhard Richter, Gerrit Rietveld, Günter Ferdinand Ris, Alexander Rodtschenko, Hans Nick Roericht, Eric Rossicci, August Sander, Richard Sapper, Tomás Saraceno, Hans Scharoun, Antje Schiffers, Oskar Schlemmer, Klaus Schmitt, Jean-Louis Schoellkopf, Franz Wilhelm Seiwert, Herbert Selldorf, Dan Tobin Smith, Mart Stam, Anton Stankowski, Andrew Stanton, Philippe Starck, Markus Sternlieb, Robert Stieler, Jane Stockdale, Giotto Stoppino,  Ian Steyaer, Jacques Tati, Bruno Taut, Terreform ONE, Augustin Tschinkel, Günther Uecker, Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart, Wilhelm Wagenfeld, Michael Wallraff, Bruno Weil , Len Wiseman, Michael Wolf, Peter Würmli, Erwin Wurm, Tokujin Yoshioka, Walter Zeischegg, Heimo Zobernig,

Artist profile, part of http://www.absolutart.com/de/

From 27th November – 6th December, AbsolutArt.com opens it’s doors to the public and welcomes you to the Absolut Art Apartment at Moritzplatz, where we will showcase our Berlin Edition featuring 40 of the most exciting artists from Germany’s capital!

Open Daily. Free Entry.
Over 50 artworks on display and for sale, 27th Nov – 6th Dec, 11am to 7pm
Atelier, Top Floor, Prinzenstrasse 84, 10969, Berlin

Absolut Art is on a mission to close the gap between artists creating and people collecting. We are an e-commerce entry-point to discover and collect contemporary art by promising and prominent artists from vibrant art scenes around the world, with 110 artists hailing from Los Angeles, Berlin, and Stockholm soon on offer.

 

When ever I see a product like this below I think WTF?!? I started this tumblr blog to collect these a while ago, feel free to submit!… –>> http://wtf3d.tumblr.com/

A blog about nonsense 3D marketing speak.
“Ultra 3D” products which have nothing to do with actual 3D (in terms of vision) and which are most of the times three dimensional anyway. But obviously they sell much better because they are 3D enhanced!! Totally unrelated…!! You are 3D too!!

3D ready mix for cleaner windows!! makes sense ….

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POST HACK or How To Send A Letter For Free:

A letter is a message written with a pen on a piece of paper (dead tree) which gets delivered in its physical original form[!!] to the recipients physical home address (house in a city i.e.). Wow, pretty cool concept, no?

  1. Materials: Paper (blank paper is ususally almost impossible to find but if you’re lucky there might be some sheets left in a printer near by), Pen (just ask your friend or cubical neighbor for a pen to borrow. I recommend to keep it after writing the letter, you might need it again later…)
  2. Write a letter (ask your friend for a FB like or something…) and fold the paper to an envelope (see video)
  3. Adress!: Now the important part! On the envelope swapp the names of sender and recipient!  put the real recipient in the field of the sender and make up a non existing address for the official recipient field.
  4. NO STAMP!!  Send it off and wait for the letter  to ‘return’ to the ‘sender’.

How does it work? The postal service will try to deliver the letter to the recipients home. Due to wrong address it will  fail and the letter will ‘go back’ to ‘the sender’ which is the real recipient. In my first try below I just swapped sender and receiver which led to a visit at the post office in Berlin where I had to reject my own letter to make it ‘go back’ to ‘the sender’ in Berlin.

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On Tuesday October 20th after class I posted the letter at a letter box (funny metal container in public, different colors depending on the country you re in) in Kassel

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Since I put my real address as recipient the Deutsche Post did send me a note (another piece of paper!)  to my Berlin address to let me know they have a letter for me. They also announced it’s gonna cost extra money because the sender was so stupid to put no stamp.

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So I went to the Post office on Torstrasse in Berlin and told the clerk that I don t know the sender and that I m not gonna pay 62 cents + 51 cents fine for this strange piece of paper. No problem she said and filed it away…

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Finally!! Yesterday on Sunday (prolly on Saturday, five days later) the letter arrived at Constants place in Berlin. Thanks for the tweet! :) https://twitter.com/constantdull/status/657978567381397504  Love it! What a beautiful envelope with all these extra notes and stamps on it.

 


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123456 (projection)
Clear text passwords leaked from Yahoo in 2012 projected in public space at the national library Montreal, October 2015.
Aram Bartholl 2015

Exhibition : ‘Common Place?‘ at Quatier de Spectacle, Montreal. October 2015
Part of ‘Human Futures‘ international project.

Pictures and video, Nelly-Eve Rajotte, THX!!
Programming Sebastian Schmieg, THX!

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Save the data!
27.09. –  22.11.15
Von Kunst und datenträgern

Kunstpalais Erlangen · www.kunstpalais.de

In Erlangen, der Stadt, in der mit Entwicklung des mp3-Formats die Digitalisierung einen ganz bedeutenden Entwicklungsschritt getan hat, fokussiert mit der Gruppenschau „Save the Data!“ erstmals eine Ausstellung das Zusammenspiel von bildender Kunst und verschiedenen Speichermedien.

Auf welche Weise werden die technischen Speichermedien – aktuelle und überholte – für den künstlerischen Ausdruck genutzt, und wie werden deren unterschiedliche Bedeutungsebenen miteinander verwoben? Welchen Einfluss hat die Digitalisierung auf die Bildgenerierung in den Medien Fotografie, Film und Skulptur? Inwieweit wird der Bedeutungswandel, den die Speichermedien von analog bis digital in den letzten Jahren und Jahrzehnten erfahren haben, durch den künstlerischen Umgang mit ihnen hinterfragt?

Schallplatten, Compact Discs und CD-ROMs, vor allem aber Musikkassetten, Disketten und VHS-Tapes verschwinden einerseits zunehmend aus dem täglichen Gebrauch –andererseits taucht solcherlei Hardware in den letzten Jahren vermehrt in Museen und Galerien auf. Als künstlerischer Werkstoff sind sie für viele Künstler zunehmend von Interesse, und auch der Betrachter freut sich über die Wiederbegegnung mit solchem zum Teil allzu vertrauten Material. Der einst gefürchtete Bandsalat, das Rattern des Filmprojektors, die Mixkassette für die Liebste oder das Bild von Regalen voller Videokassetten gehören im täglichen Leben zwar meist der Vergangenheit an, doch die damit verbundenen Gefühle zwischen Nostalgie und Zukunftseuphorie kommen umso stärker zum Tragen und werden von den Künstlern ganz gezielt eingesetzt. Der Aspekt des verborgenen Gehalts, den die gespeicherten, aber dennoch unsichtbaren Daten den Werken hinzufügen, spielt hierbei für viele eine weitere große Rolle.

Zum anderen entstehen mit Elementen des ganz zeitgenössischen Umgangs mit Dateien und Speicherstrukturen auch neue ästhetische Prototypen: so beispielsweise das Fenster im Internetbrowser oder das Raster des Bildbearbeitungsprogramms. Auch diese haben seit einiger Zeit in der künstlerischen Produktion ihren festen Platz. Vergangenheit und Zukunft werden auf diese Weise in der Schau „Save the Data!“ dicht verwoben – spannend, sinnlich wie intellektuell ansprechend und nicht zuletzt durchaus humorvoll.

with: Timo Arnall (GB), Aram Bartholl (DE), Viktoria Binschtok (RU), Gregor Hildebrandt (DE), Ronnie Yarisal und Katja Kublitz (CH und DK), Via Lewandowsky (DE), Joep van Liefland (NL), Florian Meisenberg (DE), Yuri Pattison (IE), Gebhard Sengmüller (AT)