Recent Feed Items

I know, I should write these more often, so there is less to digest in each one. Much activity of late:

1. Permanent State of Emergency

2. New Videos

3. Shows and talks

4. OMG I’m Twittering: http://twitter.com/mandiberg

5. Histoires à l’ère numérique

1. Permanent State of Emergency

soe_news

April 7 - 28: Eyebeam’s new window gallery in a Permanent State of Emergency

Date: April 7 - 28; Opening Reception: April 17, 6 - 8PM
Location: Eyebeam: 540 W. 21st, NYC
Cost: Free
http://eyebeam.org/events/permanent-state-of-emergency
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=65632172284

Eyebeam is pleased to announce the opening of State of Emergency, the inaugural exhibition of the Window Gallery, our new rotating gallery space programmed by Eyebeam fellows and residents and viewable on West 21st Street. State of Emergency, a deliberately provocative projection series organized and co-curated by Sherry Millner and Ernest Larsen, includes work by Eyebeam senior fellow Michael Mandiberg, Mary Kelly, Allan Sekula, Walid Raad, Leslie Thornton, Gregory Sholette, Louis Hock, Marty Lucas, Sally Stein, Martha Rosler, Ligorano/Reese, Yvonne Rainer, James T. Hong, and Yin-Ju Chen, as well as Millner and Larsen themselves.

State of Emergency began several years ago as a silent shout-out against the ever-deepening devastation of democracy, a group response to the manufactured "state of emergency" in which we live. This updated version reinterprets that theme to include caustic responses to the ever-deepening economic collapse.

This inaugural exhibition in the Window Gallery is an initiative of senior fellow Michael Mandiberg.

2. Watch my new videos!

They are short, and sweet, and have nice soundtracks…

HOWTO Burn the Oxford English Dictionary

HOWTO Burn a Dollar Bill

HowMuchItCosts.us

HOWTO Burn A Dollar Bill, HOWTO Burn the Oxford English Dictionary, and HowMuchItCosts.us

 

3. Upcoming and Recent Shows and Talks

Last last week we were in Chicago for the latest installment of the Eyebeam Roadshow. We gave standing room only lectures and workshops at Columbia College, UIC, and UI-Urbanan Champaign. EPIC WIN!

In the month before that Marisa Olson and I spoke at Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, I gave a remote lecture at the Inclusiva.net conference in Buenos Aires, and spoke remotely on a panel at Transmediale. I spoke at Columbia’s Studio X on a panel about urban space and the commons, and am slated to talk at Pratt on the 25th of April (time TBA). Talk Talk Talk.

The Postmasters show came down looking pretty. I should have some nice video documentation shortly.

4. OMG I’m Twittering

OMG I'm Twittering

For real, first Facebook, now Twitter. Oh, the gateway drugs.

http://twitter.com/mandiberg

5. Histoires à l’ère numérique

I am currently showing at plug.in in Basel: Histoires à l’ère numérique – works from the collection of Espace Multimédia Gantner
04/03/09 to 05/31/09

Julien Alma / Laurent Hart, Lewis Baltz, Nathalie Bookchin, Martin Le Chevallier, VALIE EXPORT, Gita Hashemi, Felix Stephan Huber / Philip Pocock, George Legrady, Michael Mandiberg, Tony Oursler, Suzanne Treister.

Around the year 2000, at the same time that [plug.in] was founded, across the border in Bourogne, France, another pioneer institution for media art was founded: The Espace Multimédia Gantner. Since then, it provides exhibitions of electronic art, events on media art, electronic music and digital culture, a library and a collection of media art works.

As a collaboration between Espace Gantner and [plug.in], the exhibition „Histoires à l’ère numérique“ presents 11 works from the collection of Espace Multimédia Gantner, selected by Annette Schindler and Raffael Dörig from [plug.in].

Hot Tip: Look out for interviews on rocketboom and coolhuntimg in the next few weeks.

Special Bonus: Call for translators for FM.

We are making progress on translations of Digital Foundations into 10 active languages. Spanish is near complete, Polish is just started. Everything else is somewhere in between. For more on how to get involved, see this page. For more information, help, or communication, get in touch with Jennifer Dopazo (jndopazo _at_ gmail _dot_ com).

 

April 30th, 2009
Eyebeam, NY
www.littlebits.cc
Join us for the launch party and exhibit opening of littleBits on Thursday April 30th at Eyebeam.
6pm: littleSneak - press preview
7pm: littleGeek - talk by ayah bdeir (ie: me)
7:30pm: bigLaunch -party
Please rsvp by April 25th at: rsvp@littlebits.cc. More info here

Charlie James Gallery
975 Chung King Road
Los Angeles, CA 90012

EVERYTHING YOU WANT, RIGHT NOW! - NEW WORK BY STEVE LAMBERT
APRIL 25 TO JUNE 6, 2009
ARTIST’S RECEPTION APRIL 25, 2009 6 - 9PM

steve-press-photo

Charlie James Gallery is pleased to announce LA’s first solo show of internationally renowned artist-activist Steve Lambert. You may have encountered Steve’s work already, though you may not be aware of it.  Maybe you saw him interviewed on CNN, or listened to him on NPR.  Lambert’s work operates in popular culture, using everyday language and humor to convey ideas that both subvert and expand the worlds of art, free technology, and media.  In the course of his work, Lambert has worked with volunteers to close every McDonald’s in Manhattan; he has renamed a street in San Francisco, and replaced advertising on the internet with curated art images. Perhaps most famously, Lambert and the Yes Men orchestrated the New York Times Special Edition, wherein he and his collaborators wrote, printed and distributed a near-perfect imitation of the New York Times, its differences detectable only in its content, which included a cavalcade of ‘if only it were true’ headlines like “Iraq War Over” and “Maximum Wage Law Succeeds.”

In Everything You Want, Right Now!, Lambert takes on the vernacular of commercial signage with a regional emphasis unique to Los Angeles.  Visually, he is interested in what makes certain styles of signage feel so innately familiar, and in the methods that signage employs to grab our attention.  Lambert will investigate the numerous emotional promises that inhere in commercial advertising, promises that may excite or reassure us, while remaining ultimately undelivered.  The business of fine art and the relevance of the white cube gallery will also come under the scrutiny of Mr. Lambert.  Under his direction, the Charlie James Gallery will be transformed into something reminiscent of an over-eager appliance store during the 6 week run of his show.  The gallery will be festooned with pennants inside and out, the windows painted over with garish promises of “Slashed Prices!” while the interior pulses away with lighted signage, all promising wild levels of deliverance to the viewer.

Steve Lambert is the founder of the Anti-Advertising Agency and the lead developer of Add-Art (a Firefox add-on that replaces online advertising with curated art images). He has collaborated with numerous artists including the Graffiti Research Lab, Packard Jennings, and the Yes Men.  Steve’s projects and art works have won awards from Lower East Side Print Shop, Rhizome/The New Museum, Turbulence, the Creative Work Fund, Adbusters Media Foundation, the California Arts Council, and others. His work has been shown at various galleries, art spaces, and museums both nationally and internationally, and was recently collected by the Library of Congress. Lambert has appeared live on NPR, the BBC, and CNN, with reportage of his exploits captured in multiple outlets including the Associated Press, the New York Times, the Guardian, Harper’s, The Believer, Good, Dwell, ARTnews, Punk Planet, and Newsweek. He is a Senior Fellow at the Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in New York, and teaches at Parsons/The New School and Hunter College. Steve studied sociology and film before receiving a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2000 and a MFA at UC Davis in 2006.

About Charlie James Gallery: Charlie James Gallery formed in 2008 in Seattle, WA and had its debut in Chinatown, downtown Los Angeles in November of 2008. The gallery exhibits emerging and mid-career artists confronting issues of contemporary cultural significance.  Housed in a 1947 Chinatown manufacturing building and newly redesigned by Dane Johnson, the gallery is situated amidst numerous other contemporary art galleries of strong reputation.  The gallery is open Wednesday to Saturday from 12-6. For more information please visit www.cjamesgallery.com  or email info@cjamesgallery.com.

(Marketer)

Really? Your name is (Marketer)?

Damn, I want to be your Fan!

The Collected Memories of the Mechanical Turk

Project description

1. An overview

Amazon has a web service called the Mechanical Turk where you can have humans perform simple repetitive tasks for you. They call it “Artificial Artificial Intelligence.” I propose to document the inner life and experiences of the Amazon’s Mechanical Turk workforce by creating tasks that explore the personal memories of these workers, as our lives are transformed by cheap bandwidth and outsourcing that is made possible by the Internet

2. The People & The Project

I am proposing a web project that queries Amazon’s Mechanical Turk workers about their memories, their ambitions, their lives, their ages, trying to gain an insight into the lives of the people of the Global Village/Global-Factory-Town. People whom we interact with in fleeting glimpses as customer service representatives, after being on hold for longer than planned, and before being put back on hold to be transferred to another department.

Amazon’s Mechanical Turk allows you to create tasks for human workers to complete. Often they are rote repetitive tasks that automate some process that could not be done by software. As Amazon dubs it: “Artificial Artificial Intelligence.” I will ask the Mechanical Turk workers about their memory; what they remember and what they forget, what they desire, and what they have lost. And on a practical level, how old they are, what level of education they have, and where they live.

3. The Outcome

These queries will be rendered as an interactive website, displaying the ages, locations, memories, and emotional states of these individuals who make up the Mechanical Turk workforce. It will also be turned into an artist book, somewhat like a book of found poetry, somewhat like a small town census. The book will be gracefully designed, and depending on cost it will be printed in an edition of 1000, or done via print on demand.

Assistants

I will be working with assistants on this project. My current assistants are Patrick Davison (http://www.whereikeepmythingsontheinternet.com/) and Clara Jo (http://www.clarajo.com/). They will be assisting with research, design, and programming as needed

Production Timeline

Assuming a start date of July (based off of a submission deadline of April 2), I expect it to take:

One month to build and design the interface to the Mechanical Turk API (July)
Two months of input from the Mechanical Turk workers (August-September)
Two months to edit and layout the book for printing (October-November)

The whole schedule could be delayed to comply with final grant deadlines.

Project Budget

Artist Fee/Artist Labor:
20 weeks, 20hrs/week, @ $6.75 (minimum wage)
$2700

Studio Cost:
5 months @ $600/mo equivalent (provided by Eyebeam)
$3000

Hosting/Domain Registration 1yr
$100

Research Assistance
($2000 Funded by College of Staten Island/CUNY Grant)
$2000

Payments to Mechanical Turk workers (each task will be $1, so $1000 will lead to 1000 entries.)
$1000

Artist Book costs
$1500

Total
$10,300

Total secured from other sources
$5000

Subtotal required to complete project
$5300

Total requested from Rhizome
$4000

Total funded by artist (from personal salary)
$1300

Curriculum Vitae

Full CV is here: http://www.mandiberg.com/cv/
Full Bio is here: http://www.mandiberg.com/about/

Short Bio:

Michael Mandiberg is known for selling all of his possessions online on Shop Mandiberg, making perfect copies of copies on AfterSherrieLevine.com, and creating Firefox plugins that highlight the real environmental costs of a global economy on TheRealCosts.com . His current projects include the co-authored groundbreaking Creative Commons licensed textbook Digital Foundations: an Intro to Media Design that teaches Bauhaus visual principles through design software, HowMuchItCosts.us, a car direction site that incorporates the financial and carbon cost of driving, and Bright Bike, a retro-reflective bicycle treehugger.com praised as “obnoxiously bright.” He is a Senior Fellow at Eyebeam, and an Assistant Professor at the College of Staten Island/CUNY. He lives in, and rides his bicycle around, Brooklyn. His work lives at Mandiberg.com

Work Samples

HowMuchItCosts.us
, 2009
HowItCosts.us is a Google maps upgrade that calculates gas consumption and emissions along with trip directions.

The Real Costs
, 2007
Real Costs is a Firefox plug-in that calculates the environmental impact of air travel by adding CO2 emissions data to airfare websites such as Orbitz.com, United.com, Delta.com, etc. It is like nutrition information labeling for airplane emissions. The Real Costs was commissioned by Rhizome.org.

Oil Standard, 2006
Oil Standard is a Firefox plugin that convers all prices on a webpage into barrles of crude oil, exploring the moment when oil replace(d) gold as the standard by which we trade all goods and currencies.

Bush Poll, 2004
There are 153 persons named George Bush in the US phone directory; during the run up to the 2004 election I performed an opinion survey about their political opinions, their polarization over political issues, and their potential reflection of an American people divided over their Presidential representation.

O’Reilly Radar and Boing Boing picked up on the HOWTO CC post, which echoed through the blogs.  Some of of the louder echos are: Robin Good’s reposting, which includes ironic stock photographs (something I’ve been meaning to do!)

Eyebeam is holding a “How To Apply” Forum on April 16 at 7 PM featuring past Eyebeam Resident and recent Residency Curatorial Panelist Robert Ransick (Bennington College, Vermont) and current Eyebeam Senior Fellow Steve Lambert (Parsons/The New School and Hunter College).  The forum is a chance for those interetsed in applying to our current cycle of Eyebeam Residencies, open April 1 – May 15, to ask questions and have dicussions with those who have gone through it and seen both sides of the application process, both as an artist and a selection panelist.

Eyebeam Residencies
Summer / Fall 2009

You’ve got big ideas. You could use a little time and money, not to mention support and inspiration, to create a visionary project. Apply now for Eyebeam’s Summer/Fall 2009 Residency cycle. Residents are granted a $5,000 stipend and 24/7 access to Eyebeam’s state of the art digital design and fabrication studios at their Chelsea facility.


About the Residency

Eyebeam residencies support the creative research, production and presentation of initiatives querying art, technology and culture. The residency is a period of concentration and immersion in artistic investigation, daring research or production of visionary, experimental applications and projects. Past initiatives have ranged from live animation, sound and physical computing works to technical prototypes, installations and tactical media events. Check out what our current and past residents have been doing here:  http://eyebeam.org/people-residents/residents.

The ideal resident will both contribute to and benefit from the collective environment at Eyebeam, and will embrace the spirit of openness shared across the organization: open source, open content and open distribution.

To promote collaboration and the sharing of diverse skill sets, Eyebeam has established and continues to encourage the formation of research groups that bring together creative practitioners working at Eyebeam as well as expert external participants.

New research often leads to public outcomes including seminars, workshops and exhibition. Research groups currently active at Eyebeam include:

•    Sustainability
•    Urban Research
•    Middle Eastern Research
•    Open Cultures

Artists and creative technologists interested in these research areas are particularly encouraged to apply for 2009 residencies, but we are also open to accepting ideas for emerging areas of research.

Eyebeam is also seeking proposals from artists whose practices:
a) actively engage different community groups, especially youth;
b) focus on open source/culture ideologies, including intellectual property, licensing issues and law; and/or
c) investigate sustainable models of food production and consumption and the impact of those models on society.

Residents are expected to participate in public events including workshops, demonstrations of research in progress, panel discussions, and online releases, in addition to regularly scheduled open studio events.

The program term is from the beginning of August to the end of January. Residents will be selected from an open call, based on the quality of the work or research being proposed, the availability of the necessary tools and skills to support the work, and in consideration of the overarching research themes and activities of the organization.

Eyebeam is committed to building a diverse creative environment. We recognize diversity as encompassing personal style, age, race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity, language, physical ability, religion, family, citizenship status, socioeconomic circumstances, education and life experiences. We consequently encourage applications from the broadest possible range of artists and creative technologists to all of our programs.

To Apply

Applications are accepted via our online application system. We will be hosting a “How To Apply” Forum, in New York City, on April 16 at 7 PM featuring past Eyebeam Resident and recent Residency curatorial panelist Robert Ransick (Bennington College, Vermont) and current senior fellow Steve Lambert (Parsons/The New School and Hunter College).

Many of the most frequently asked questions are answered online. Be sure to visit our FAQ for applicants and Equipment Inventory List before you apply. If you have any questions, contact residencyinfo AT eyebeam DOT org.

Equipment Inventory List:
http://eyebeam.org/get-involved-residencies/equipment-list

FAQ for applicants:
http://eyebeam.org/get-involved-residencies/faq

Go ahead, apply at:
http://69.60.21.163/production/onlineapp/joindetail.php?programid=925081

Requirements

Applications received after the deadline of May 15, 2009, will not be accepted. All applications and work samples must be submitted through the online form. No exceptions will be made. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Complete applications must include the following information:

• Contact information;
• Resume or CV (rtf or pdf doc);
• Work samples in the form of URLs or uploaded media;
• Answers to all application questions.

Please be advised that Eyebeam’s online application system allows you to log into your user account to update your application until the final deadline. However, you must enter information into all required fields in order to save your application.

soe_news
Permanent State of Emergency, video still

April 7 - 28: Eyebeam’s new window gallery in a Permanent State of Emergency

Date: April 7 - 28; Opening Reception: April 17, 6 - 8PM
Location: Eyebeam: 540 W. 21st, NYC
Cost: Free
http://eyebeam.org/events/permanent-state-of-emergency

Eyebeam is pleased to announce the opening of State of Emergency, the inaugural exhibition of the Window Gallery, our new rotating gallery space programmed by Eyebeam fellows and residents and viewable on West 21st Street. State of Emergency, a deliberately provocative projection series organized and co-curated by Sherry Millner and Ernest Larsen, includes work by Eyebeam senior fellow Michael Mandiberg, Mary Kelly, Allan Sekula, Walid Raad, Leslie Thornton, Gregory Sholette, Louis Hock, Marty Lucas, Sally Stein, Martha Rosler, Ligorano/Reese, Yvonne Rainer, James T. Hong, and Yin-Ju Chen, as well as Millner and Larsen themselves.

State of Emergency began several years ago as a silent shout-out against the ever-deepening devastation of democracy, a group response to the manufactured “state of emergency” in which we live. This updated version reinterprets that theme to include caustic responses to the ever-deepening economic collapse.

This inaugural exhibition in the Window Gallery is an initiative of senior fellow Michael Mandiberg.

Here’s a nice article in Digimag about the Triptych Party at Postmasters.

you-tube-and-the-accidental-videoart-monica-ponzini

Go and see work I prepared special for this show entitled, Steve Lambert refused to participate in this exhibition because the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art does not budget for artists fees, mixed media, 2009.

Exhibition: April 4 – June 20, 2009
Opening Reception: Friday April 3, 6-8 PM

It’s Not Us, It’s You is an exhibition that explores the inevitability of rejection in our lives – a timely topic in today’s woeful economic climate. Through a tragic and sometimes heartbreaking lens, the artists in this exhibition respond to the reality of rejection with subversion, self-reflection, humor and brutal honesty. The show is guest curated by artist Ray Beldner and includes paintings, sculpture, video, and multi-media work from artists Anthony Discenza, Stephanie Syjuco, Michael Arcega, Kara Maria, Steve Lambert, Jonn Herschend, Dee Hibbert-Jones, Nomi Talisman, Desiree Holman, Orly Cogan, Kate Gilmore, Robert Eads and Arthur Gonzalez.

As part of It’s Not Us, It’s You, Beldner is compiling a book of artist rejection letters. Artists are invited to send their rejection letters via email to info@sjica.org with “FOR REJECTION SHOW” in the subject by March 28. The ICA promises that no entries will be rejected for this project.

It’s Not Us, It’s You is presented in the ICA’s Focus Gallery, Cardinale Project Room and Night Moves windows (after-dark programming in the ICA’s front windows) from April 4 through June 20. An opening reception on Friday, April 3 from 6-8pm will feature an open-mic session for rejection confessions.