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Issue 3 of Proximity Magazine includes an interview with Steve Lambert by James H. Ewert, Jr.

JHEJR: What was the first prank you ever pulled off?

SL: In 8th grade, I realized that if I ran for class president, I got to give a speech in front of the whole school, and they had to listen to me. I ran really just so I could have a couple minutes to talk to the whole school with a microphone.

Read it all at the Proximty Magazine site.

We stopped by Talkshow247 for a little while.  It was fun.

We kicked off the Eyebeam Roadshow two weeks ago in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, at University of Iowa, in the Studio Arts department.  We started a Flickr group for the photos.

We had a great time in Iowa.  Everyone was super nice, and we built an awesome fort in the Studio Arts Building, which was, awesomely, a former Home Depot (but they call it Manards in Iowa — silly Iowans).

Steve Lambert and I did a “The Web for Artists” workshop.  Jamie O’Shea and Christina Kral did a circuit bending workshop, and Steve did a Shopdropping workshop.  It was a great start to the Roadshow.

The New York Times has just released a special edition about the end of the war and is handing it out all over the streets of New York.  There is a video about it.  Go and digg it immediately.  The site is a little slow because it is getting hit really hard.  So be patient.  Or, if you live in New York, just go to Manhattan and get yourself a print edition.

Woooo!  It’s finally over!

What has been your most extreme weather experience?

Describe it here.

We asked people from all over the world to tell their climate change story at the Luminous Green workshop. Listen and tell your climate change story here.

Singaporean Yeow Ching Shiang explains why ‘Christmas every day’ is not as good as it sounds

Dr. Lanfranco Aceti discusses desertification in Italy and the influence of the US on Italian culture

Jura Kaario speaks of his experiences in Finland growing up near a frozen lake

Singaporean designer Jeremy Sun Ting Kung talks about growing up in Taiwan and how design can change behavior

Isrizal, a Singaporean activist, talks about the loss of his boyhood home and learning how to ask permission to impact the environment

October 25th, 2008 - Eyebeam, NY - closing panel and discussion for untethered

After the reactor accident at Chernobyl in 1986, she found her true calling: since then, Cornelia Hesse-Honegger has been studying and drawing malformed insects, especially true bugs (Heteroptera), which she collects in fallout areas and in the periphery of nuclear facilities. Building on her 25 years of experience as a scientific illustrator at the Natural History Museum of the University of Zurich (Switzerland), she has created beautiful evidence of a threatened animal world, which has been displayed in international art galleries. Together with the former scientific editor Peter Wallimann, Hesse-Honegger has now summarized her comprehensive studies in the journal Chemistry & Biodiversity.

A New F*cking Wilderness has a bunch of great new updates, with footage of a bear deciding not to eat at Subway and Vladimir Putins limited edition siberian tiger pup.