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It’s about time more moss grows in brooklyn. Edina Tokodi has been creating moss figures on building sites, and other abondoned walls. I’m guessing it’s a mixture of found moss, some biodegrable glue. Hopefully they will stay, expand and grow beyond the boundaries of her figures.

In attempt to promote it’s fresh salads, McDonalds has begun installing billboards showcasing it’s greenery. Instead of using plain bold text, it’s using plants to fill in the bold text. Very Green. I wonder what happens as the plants become part of a larger system, where the billboards become nests for birds, rodents, and insects. Could billboards be become part of an ecosystem? Probably not part of the grand plan, and besides who waters them??

Bio-Terrorism or Art?

Bio-Terrorism or Art?

Join Dr. Steven Kurtz, the artist accused by the US Department of Justice of “bioterrorism” stemming from his use of scientific materials in his award-winning art practice, and science writer Carl Zimmer for a panel discussion on the ethics of scientific and creative research and freedom of speech.

Kurtz, a University at Buffalo professor and founding member of the Critical Art Ensemble, uses biological materials in educational exhibits and performances designed to inspire debate about political and social issues, including those surrounding new biotechnologies. In May of 2004, he was detained on suspicion of “bioterrorism” for his possession of a small laboratory and petri dishes containing bacteria cultures used in several of Critical Art Ensemble’s projects. When these accusations proved groundless, he was then charged with mail and wire fraud—charges which carried a possible sentence of 20 years in jail under the USA PATRIOT Act. Earlier this month, a federal judge dismissed those charges; however, the US Department of Justice may still appeal the dismissal.

This month’s Upgrade! New York is a collaboration between Eyebeam and the World Science Festival, with additional support from the Berkeley Center for New Media.

Download press release: The Upgrade! presents Art in the Age of Terrorism

http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/

2008 World Science Festival

Art in the Age of Terrorism

Dr. Steven Kurtz, the artist accused by the US Department of Justice of “bioterrorism” stemming from his use of scientific materials in his award-winning art practice, and science writer Carl Zimmer for a panel discussion on the ethics of scientific and creative research and freedom of speech.

Kurtz, a University at Buffalo professor and founding member of the Critical Art Ensemble, uses biological materials in educational exhibits and performances designed to inspire debate about political and social issues, including those surrounding new biotechnologies. In May of 2004, he was detained on suspicion of “bioterrorism” for his possession of a small laboratory and petri dishes containing bacteria cultures used in several of Critical Art Ensemble’s projects. When these accusations proved groundless, he was then charged with mail and wire fraud—charges which carried a possible sentence of 20 years in jail under the USA PATRIOT Act. Earlier this month, a federal judge dismissed those charges; however, the US Department of Justice may still appeal the dismissal.

This Upgrade! New York was a collaboration between Eyebeam and the World Science Festival, with additional support from the Berkeley Center for New Media.

http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/

It doesn’t take long for plants and small animals to move in once a bank forecloses on a home. In the time it take s the bank to find a buyer, other residents have moved in and taken advantage of the free space.

source: Washington Post

OptoSonic Tea :: Friday May 30th,2–8 :: 8:30 pm ::
Live sets by: Daniel Vatsky and Chris Jordan (video) and John Cohrs (audio), Pamela Z,
:: Invited respondent/moderator: Miya Masaoka ::

OptoSonic Tea is a regular series of meetings dedicated to the convergence of live visuals with live sound which focuses on the visual component. These presentation-and-discussion meetings aim to explore different forms of live visuals (live video, live film, live slide projection and their variations and combinations) and the different ways they can come into interaction with live audio.

Experimental Intermedia ::
224 Centre Street at Grand, Third Floor,
NY 10013 :: 212 431 5127, 212 431 6430

organized by Ursula Scherer and Katherine Liberovskaya
Turbulance article

What about all the local toxins in your house such as paints, adhesives, oils, household cleaners.

Good Magazine put together a little article about which plants can be used to offset these local toxins.

target
I’ve created the worlds largest target. There’s a lot of competition but I think I can claim to have created the largest one in existence today. It’s 25,000ft X 20,392ft = 509 million sq ft!!, or 18.28 sq miles!! This is roughly the size of Manhattan (22 sq miles). Thats a target that’s hard to miss.

eco-vis

Eyebeam hosted a public critique for the Eco-Vis Challenge submissions as part of the Upgrade! series of public programming.

A distinguished panel of New York-based artists and designers discussed what role an art and technology center can play in raising public awareness on environmental issues, and how visualizing environmental data can address the crisis. The guest critics not only dicussed their criteria for a useful, engaging, and successful visualization project, but were available to give in-depth feedback to the Eco-Vis Challenge participants. Panelists included: Michael Mandiberg, Natalie Jeremijemko, and Upgrade! founders Mushon Zer-Aviv and Yael Kanarek.

Trevor Paglen

Trevor Paglen presented his projects and collaborations, which included his current Eyebeam commission. Joined by the Eyebeam Production Fellows, Jeff Crouse, Evan Harper, Geraldine Juárez and Chris Sugrue, his collaborators on his commissioned piece with Eyebeam, Paglen detailed the project and progress to date.

Geographer and artist Trevor Paglen takes us on a road trip through the world of hidden budgets, state secrets, covert military bases, and disappeared people: through a landscape that military and intelligence insiders call the “black world.” Over the course of his talk, Paglen leads us from “non-existent” Air Force and CIA installations in the Nevada desert to secret prisons in Afghanistan and to a collection of even more obscure “black sites” startlingly close to home. Using hundreds of images he has produced and collected over the course of his work, Paglen shows how the black world’s internal contradictions give rise to a peculiar visual, aesthetic, and epistemological grammar with which to think about the contemporary moment.

Paglen and IAA also presented their collaborative work, Terminal Air, in Eyebeam’s exhibition Interference. The exhibition was on view prior to The Upgrade!

http://www.paglen.com/