Recent Persons

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Ramsey Nasser is a New York based computer scientist investigating programming languages as mediums of self expression. By looking at code as a vehicle of thought, he develops new languages to explore the relationship between human imagination and machine instruction. Zajal, his first language in this inquiry, is an attempt to reduce the friction between an artist's creative vision and functioning software.

His other work includes software and game design. Recently, he collaborated with IGF-nominated game designer Kurt Bieg on Twirdie, a Twitter powered golf game that uses the world's conversations as its core mechanic.

Ramsey's work has been featured on NPR, in ACM publications, at Babycastles, and at the Game Developers Conference.

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Lindsay Howard is a curator and researcher based in New York.  She is the Curatorial Fellow at Eyebeam and Curatorial Director of 319 Scholes.

Her work uses experimental curatorial models to reflect what she sees as an essential shift in contemporary culture, specifically a growing interest in collaborative creativity, open source philosophy, and unlimited access to information.

She regularly speaks on topics surrounding new media art, recently at Art Basel Miami Beach, NYU-Poly, and School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  She has served on selection committees at Baltan Labs, Eyebeam Art + Technology Center, The Mozilla Foundation, and The New School.

While at Eyebeam, she curated two major exhibitions: Eyebeam Resurfaces: The Future of the Digital Archive (co-organized with Jonathan Minard) and  F.A.T. GOLDa 5-year retrospective of the Free Art & Technology (F.A.T.) Lab, which brought together an international group of 25 collaborators comprised of artists, hackers, engineers, musicians, and graffiti writers.  The exhibition was accompanied by three weeks of public programs, both online and in the gallery, including panel discussions, workshops, and live performances.

Her work has been featured on ANIMAL, ARTINFO, Art Fag City, BOMB Magazine, Brooklyn Rail, Core77, Creators Project, Dazed & Confused Magazine, Fast Company, Gawker, Hyperallergic, Rhizome, TechCrunch, The Verge, and WIRED. In 2012, she was named "Best of Young Brooklyn" by L Magazine and "50 Up-and-Coming New York Culture Makers to Watch in 2013" by Flavorwire.

Email: lindsay (at) eyebeam (dot) org

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Daniel Neumann is a Brooklyn-based sound artist and audio engineer, originally from Leipzig, Germany. In Leipzig, besides getting his degree in media art at the Academy of Visual Art, he co-organized ‘AlulaTonSerien’, a platform for sound art and electro-acoustic music that featured concerts, workshops, soundwalks, CD releases and a radio show. He also studied electronic music composition under Emanuelle Casale in Catania, Sicily.


In his artistic practice he is using conceptual and mostly collaborative strategies to explore sound and sound material and it's modulation through space and media. Pieces are developed in different formats and variations as ongoing processes, which can result in performances, installations, or radio shows amongst others. The leitmotif for these processes is the development of a poetry of the fragile, and a skepticism towards demonstrations of power. Impermanence is understood as temporal fragility. For his collaborative practice Daniel coined the term ‘modular collaboration’, which describes a non-hierarchical and decentralized form of organization, where collaborators interact as equals. Context and site are important parameters and often used as a starting point.

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Zach Gage is a designer, programmer, educator, and conceptual artist from New York City. His work explores the increasingly blurring line between the physical and the digital. He has exhibited internationally at venues like the Venice Biennale, the Giant Robot/Scion Space in Los Angeles, and the Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle in Warsaw. His work has been featured in several online and printed publications, including Rhizome.org, Neural Magazine, New York Magazine, and Das Spiel und seine Grenzen (Springer Press).

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Caroline Woolard is a Brooklyn based, post-media artist exploring civic engagement and communitarianism. Her work is collaborative and often takes the form of sculptures, websites, and workshops. Woolard is a co-founder of OurGoods.org and Trade School, two barter economies for cultural producers, and a coordinating member of SolidarityNYC, an organization that promotes grassroots economic justice.

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Nick Fox-Gieg is an animator based in Toronto. His film “The Orange” won the jury prize for Best Animated Short at SXSW 2010; his films have also screened at the Ottawa, Rotterdam, TIFF, and Zagreb film festivals, at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and on CBC TV. He's received Bravo!FACT and Canada Council commissions, media arts grants from Toronto, Ontario, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, and a Fulbright fellowship to the Netherlands.  Fox-Gieg holds an MFA from the California Institute of the Arts and a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University. He's currently a Fellow at the Eyebeam Art and Technology Center in NYC.

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Brian House is a bricoleur whose work has traversed locative media, experimental music, interactive narrative, and social practice. By constructing embodied, participatory systems, he seeks to negotiate between programmed constraints and the serendipity of everyday life. Past work includes a reenactment of Diego Maradona's "Hand of God" goal from the 1986 World Cup, performed at MOCA (LA), a recasting of a Primo Levi novel into a text-messaging robot, commissioned by Rhizome, and Yellow Arrow, a collaborative deep-mapping project featured at MoMA and in Wired, PRAXIS, Metropolis, and The New York Times. Currently, he is a member of the R&D lab at The New York Times Company where he is interested in personal data and sensor networks. Brian studied for degrees in art and technology from Columbia University in New York and Chalmers University in Göteborg, Sweden. His band is called Multitudes.

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Heather Dewey-Hagborg is an information artist who is interested in exploring art as research and public inquiry. Traversing media ranging from algorithms to installation, her work seeks to question fundamental assumptions underpinning perceptions of human nature, technology and the environment. Heather has shown work internationally at events and venues including Jaaga art and technology center in Bangalore, the Monitor Digital Festival in Guadalajara, PS1 Moma, the New Museum, Issue Project Room, and Splatterpool in New York City, Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, and CEPA Gallery in Buffalo. In addition to her individual work she collaborates often with the collective Future Archaeology. Heather has a BA in Information Arts from Bennington College and a Masters degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University where she currently teaches as an Adjunct Professor.

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Beyza Boyacioglu is a video artist based in New York. Her works reflect upon the limits of language and the flaws of communication. She creates constructed performances as well as documentaries and interviews in order to capture the constrains of language.

She pursued her BA degree in Visual Arts in Sabanci University in Istanbul. She will earn her MFA in Computer Art from School of Visual Arts in May 2012. At Eyebeam, she worked for Taeyoon Choi as a videographer, video editor and animator.

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Albert Chao addresses the intersection of technology and architecture. With a foundation in physical computing, interaction design and parametric modeling, his work explores the mapping of ephemeral experiences through fabricated objects and speculative design proposals. Albert is a recent graduate of a Media, Architecture and Computing MArch + MFA dual degree program at the University at Buffalo.