Recent Projects

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This artwork questions the use of Video Visitation technology introduced in US prisons over the past several years. The term "White Torture" originally comes from Iran, where intellectuals, activists and detainees themselves use it to refer to the use of incommunicado solitary confinement. In the installation a reproduction of the Video Visitation device is installed inside a small, uncomfortable white booth. One by one, audience members come inside the booth to watch the videos and pick up the phone receiver to try to communicate through the device. The videos played on the screen are clips recorded from the previous person in the booth. These recordings are extremely overexposed, with the white color and white noise in the speakers, making the images opaque and the sounds very hard to understand. The device plays in the previously recorded short video for each subsequent visitor. Afterwards, it publishes the clips on a public website. By taking part in a disturbed encounter with themselves, the installation's participants ultimately become prisoners of the mediated human interpersonal communication. The audience's experience in first person is a symbolic representation of White Torture - social and sensory isolation through both the attempt to communicate with someone not present, visible or audible, and the state of being under camera surveillance.

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Wages For Facebook draws upon ideas from a 1970s feminist activist campaign as means to think through and challenge relationships of capitalism, class and affective labor at stake within social media today.

In the 70s Wages For Housework demanded that the state pay women for their unwaged housework and caregiving, as the market economy was built upon massive amounts of this unacknowledged work—and its laborers could be seen to constitute a huge working class entirely overlooked by existing Marxist or socialist critiques. Wages for Housework built upon discourse from the anticolonial movement in order to extend the analysis of unwaged labor from the factory to the home. Along these lines Wages For Facebook attempts to draw upon feminist discourse to extend the discussion of unwaged labor to new forms of value creation and exploitation online.

In 2012 Facebook reached more than 1 billion users and generated a revenue of 5.1 billion dollars. It is the first social-media website to be traded on the stock exchange wherein all content on its site is created by its users. Is what we do on Facebook work? How would we calculate our value? What could an alternate form of social media, based on an idea of the commons or a feminist praxis, look like?

As soon as it launched in January 2014 wagesforfacebook.com was graced with over 20,000 views (and counting)—clearly touching a collective nerve and beginning a broader public conversation about worker's rights and the very nature of labor, as well as the politics of its refusal, in our digital age.

Engendering much public debate, it has been frequently tweeted; discussed by mainstream and left media; spawned an activist group; analyzed across disciplines of geography, cultural studies, anthropology, public health, labor and more; and is the subject of workshops and installations in the art context taking place in Chicago, New York, London, San Diego, San Francisco, Stockholm, Toronto.

http://wagesforfacebook.com
http://www.thenation.com/blog/177887/should-facebook-pay-its-users#
http://www.ibtimes.com/wages-facebook-campaign-demands-pay-social-media-...
http://www.dissentmagazine.org/article/wages-for-facebook
https://www.jacobinmag.com/2014/02/the-labor-of-social-media/
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/04/how-much-should-fa...
http://falkvinge.net/2014/01/20/wages-for-facebook-maybe-its-not-so-crazy/
https://www.jacobinmag.com/2014/02/work-it/
http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/digital-economy-holding-women-back/
http://readersupportednews.org/opinion2/298-185/21477-time-for-a-digital...
http://www.thehindu.com/opinion/blogs/blog-hypertext/article5925692.ece
http://www.artforum.com/diary/id=45531
https://www.jacobinmag.com/2014/05/the-rise-of-the-voluntariat/
http://www.newcriticals.com/care-work-and-the-stakes-of-social-media-ref...
http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/10/congratulations-you-fooled-f...

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Dream House is a generative 3D simulation of a “female” biomorphic architectural structure that dynamically builds up with consumer products over 7 hours. The accumulation of waste occurs in real time and is left up to chance, producingunique randomized animations. Two cameras capture the real time simulation from multiple angles, providing numerous experiences of the same scene. Thepiece is a monument to desire and waste caused by a system that manipulates desire for monetary means.

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Based on a nation-wide survey of artists and content creators, Fair Use(r) examines the challenges and legal implications facing artists who upload their work to hosting platforms such as YouTube, Blip, Tumblr and Soundcloud.

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Using NYC.gov wireless hotspot data, “WiFi Spotting” topographically visualizes Wi-Fi saturation in the metropolis. Areas with higher saturation of access points form the peaks of these mountainous terrains, thus lending physicality to the usually ephemeral in our constantly changing cityscape. “WiFi Spotting” highlights how our immediate environments are saturated by constant signals, and it aims to materialize the underlying social contracts hidden within our ubiquitous noise.

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CT-SWaM (Contemporary Temporary Sound Works And Music) is Eyebeam’s late night concert series curated by Eyebeam Alumni Daniel Neumann, happening intermittently in Eyebeam’s Main Space.

The series focusses on contemporary sound experiments, electro-acoustic multi-channel performance, social relations, improvisation, lowercase artistic presence, and topology – study of place/space with a spatial concept that goes beyond linear, geometrical understandings of space.

One goal of the series is to create unique situations, to stay irregular, to only apply methods that don’t appear as such – regularities should seem incidental and are then very welcome. The work is the focus and its presentation therefore has to be plastic, morphing, not static. Context provides security: if worked within and against it.

Mostly on Mondays, when galleries are Closed.

Sign up here for the mailing list!

The series is supported by the Alice M. Ditson Fund of Columbia University.

 

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"Dark Side of the Prism" is a Firefox Add-on that provides a soundtrack for our surveilled internet meanderings.

The public recently learned that the US National Security Agency's on-going internet surveillance program, Prism, collects data from users of major websites. Many of us already know that any data we might share-- not just Facebook posts, but our search and click pathways and histories-- could be compromised, but we do so anyway. We have normalized this ubiquitous surveillance.

"Dark Side of the Prism" uses Pink Floyd's aural prism (Dark Side of the Moon) as a playlist to the NSA's tracking efforts, serving as an auditory reminder of how our online activities are surveilled. What hypochondriac questions do you Google in the middle of the night; who do you cyberstalk? Consider those missives the lyrical component to our soundtrack. 

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Since Eyebeam’s founding 16 years ago, 2013 marks the very first year that its roster of Fellows and Residents includes more women than men. The Very First Year is a series of public events and installations in consideration of this fact, organized by 2013 fellow Laurel Ptak and inspired by her ongoing research at Eyebeam into cyberfeminist art practices since the 1990s.

 The Very First Year will explore contemporary aspects of gender, feminism, technology and art from numerous angles. A range of activities and installations will take place at Eyebeam, including public events on:

Inaugural event featuring afternoon installations and activities by Feminist Economics Department, Miki Foster, Jen Kennedy + Liz Linden, Queer Technologies and Caroline Woolard.

AND evening potluck dinner and presentations of current work by female Eyebeam Alumnae including Kaho Abe, Stefani Bardin, Carrie Dashow, Claudia Hart, CHiKA Iijima, Norene Leddy, Maria Michails, Carrie Mae RoseStephanie Rothenberg, Marie Sester, Katie Torn, Carmen Trudell, Katayoun Vaziri and Caroline Woolard.

Full schedule and participant bios are here. Photos here.

         The New York Times Feminist Reading Group

A reading group dedicated to reading that day's The New York Times from a feminist perspective, hosted by Jen Kennedy and Liz Linden.

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

Attending to Wikipidia's notorious gender gap with an all day communal updating of entries on subjects related to contemporary art and feminism. With 30 satellite edit-a-thons also happening across the U.S. and internationally.

Organized by Siân Evans/Art Libraries Society of North America's Women and Art Special Interest Group, Jacqueline Mabey/The office of failed projects, former Eyebeam Fellow Michael Mandiberg and current Eyebeam Fellow Laurel Ptak.

Full detials are here. Photos are here. Some press is here , here and here.

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usplus is a Google Hangout app that analyzes the speech and facial expression of both participants to optimize their chat interaction experience.

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God's Eyes takes the voyeuristic dynamics of social networking to unfamiliar extremes by giving ultimate power to one user at a time, enabling them to peer into and engage with a panoply of other users' lives.