Recent Projects

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Bondage is a piece about enigma drawing on mystery and fantasy. It is digital in nature, but analog on the surface. The artist uses wood and paper as a vehicle for digital image and sound projecting a Japanese woman in a kimono onto a sliding paper shoji screen. The sounds are sine-waves, but not in a typical ultra-clean design space. The viewer’s presence completes the loop, uncovering parts of Nobuyoshi Araki’s original photograph, scanned left to right in frequency bands producing sound. The quadraphonic sound system is oriented vertically in the plane of the paper screen. The fibers of the paper give an organic surface for the digital pixels. The result is a total environment, a concentrated space where sound meets image, but where interaction is not pushed to the fore. Instead, he attempts to create a magical space, drawing upon the voyeuristic fantasies of the viewer.

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Steina plays the violin,the video, and is the performer so that in intermediary ways the observer and the observed converge. The languages of the two media, music and video, are interconnected according to their abstractness where the sound creates the waveforms of the image. Music is visually explored as a medium developing temporal and spatial features: not only does the sound spread the scan lines so that they become horizontally visible thereby exploring temporal dimensionality, but Steina also uses the Scan Processor to modulate the soundwaves until they build up spatial forms of the image. Through the Scan Processor, brighter parts of the "image" are lifted so that the horizontal lines also vertically deflect and create sculptural pattern. This work was exhibited as part of the What Sound Does a Color Make? exhibition at Eyebeam Atelier.

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Noisefields uses a Video Sequencer to switch between two video sources to create flickering effects in a self-reflexive interplay of visual input. The imagery presented refers to its detecting of electronic signals and does not carry any other information, except that the Colorizer is used for variation. The circular form introduces a simple division into an inner and an outer field of interrelated pulsation, so that on the whole, the "content" of this work is an audiovisual modulation of "video noise."  This piece was exhibited at Eyebeam Atelier as part of the What Sound Does a Color Make? exhibition.

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Trevor (1999) features manipulated video footage of musician Trevor Wishart which is manipulated to electronically slur his words into unrecognizable stutters or stretched out abstract sound. Attempts to
understand what he is trying to communicate are frustrated as both he and the viewer are
subjected to digital control. The incomprehensible utterances begin to seem like a rhythm that highlights correspondences between seeing and hearing, while drawing viewers’ attention to their own expectations about performance and installation.  This work was exhibited as part of What Sound Does a Color Make at Eyebeam Atelier.

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D-Fuse, sent samples of digital videos to international sound artists with the goal of challenging conventional model of MTV-type music videos. Musicians were inspired to create exclusive audio tracks for the videos. This collaboration resulted in D-Tonate, a DVD compilation of eleven video tracks created and reinterpreted in up to five versions which can be randomly accessed by the viewer at viewing stations. Gallery visitors are invited to “mix and modify” various versions of the music videos through the use of remote controls.

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Medical Imaging Technologies provide new images of our "selves"—from the "inside"—while the diseases they are made to diagnose or track give us new "social identities." To enter breast cancerland is to enter a hall of mirrors, with images and identities appearing everywhere: centerfolds to mammos, being a "patient" to becoming a "survivor", losing hair to buying pink, feminism to consumerism.

The breast as medical object or image—with its own codes, vocabularies, and interpretive strategies legible only to experts—is entangled with the breast as social object and art object. What has resulted and what can result from this entanglement?

This is a multipart, multimedia project with both visual/experiential and educational/workshop components.

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The USA has by far the greatest number of places called Paradise.

The first voyagers to the Americas really believed they had found Eden; Columbus called it “the terrestrial paradise." But the founders of the US took that idea in a new direction: paradise as a place to be simultaneously discovered and made.

So it seems consistent with the mixture of American literalism and idealism, that if you punch in "paradise" for any of the American states, google maps pulls up something, an unincorporated township, a valley, a county …

In the long wake of utopias and in full view of continued war and the ruins of the economic crisis, we plan an interactive web-based map of Paradise (USA) using google’s personalized maps feature. Video, audio, photo, webcam and text files will be uploaded and viewable for the various locations called paradise.

Through the new utopian promises of virtual technologies our project examines the old, but nonetheless virtual, uber-utopia of paradise.

 

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Museums are increasingly adopting open data policies, both for easy internal reuse of data sets and as a way of building community engagement online. While the opening up of data is a welcome development, too often key audiences see too little of this information through too small a keyhole. As linked and open data formats and Application Programming Interfaces become more common for cultural repositories, providing a sense of the scope and shape of museum collections is moving from a problem of data access to one of presentation.

This project includes a set of tools for collections dissemination and visualizations appropriate for aggregate museum collection metadata, built with an eye to answering different questions than most museums currently address online.

Related work:
¿Qué tienen? Visualizaciones de las colecciones de los museos

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Diskotron (2002)
Modified turntable, software, optical sensor and computer

Diskotron is an optical turntable that can play "records" which can be printed or drawn. The turntable is outfitted with a high-resolution optical sensor array and a speedy microprocessor, enabling it to turn visual marks and codes into MIDI sequences in real time. Connected to a computer, Diskotron functions as a live performance instrument combined with a hands-on tangible interface.

Pashenkov was born in the Soviet Union in 1975 and since 1991 he has resided in New York City .He has worked as a designer and site developer at methodfive and then PlumbDesign, both large web development companies in New York. In the fall of 2000, he joined the Aesthetics & Computation Group at the MIT Media Laboratory under the guidance of John Maeda.

 

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Four walls of a space are "painted", with video projectors, into a single photo realistic 360º landscape representing a public garden. The space, set in Montreal's Mont-Royal Park, is being visited by real and virtual characters.  If the virtual characters appear to come and go in the garden, real visitors will need help to walk in and explore.  For this they have to make contact with one of the virtual character by selecting, using voice or touch, questions or comments from imposed sets. Questions on, for example, where they are, what is around, where one can go from here will engage a conversation leading to some form of relationship. The exchange may be cut short with everyone going back to their business or it may reach a point where visitors will convince a character to lead them somewhere. In such case, visitors are being pulled through the landscape after their virtual guide and the whole room appears to be moving in this direction.

The dialogue between the guide and the visitor or group goes on and defines the progression through space. Because real visitors are using virtual characters to steer their way through space, the nature of visitor's relationship to the character will define the space—physical or metaphorical—that can be accessed. There are several possible destinations or outcome. Visitors could simply be abandoned somewhere on the way if the connection to the character is broken, or they could be reaching a destination: a lookout or a forbidden boundary.