Recent Projects

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Jet Set Willy Variations consists of modifications of the 1984 video game Jet Set Willy. The original game was made for the obsolete British computer Sinclair ZX Spectrum, which was popular in the early 1980s.

"These versions of Jet Set Willy...become increasingly more abstract, finding inspiration in the non-narrative parts of the game. One of JODI's modifications is based on the copy-protection card, a red, blue, green and pink grid that shipped with every copy of the original game. The pattern provided access codes that were necessary to 'unlock' the game. Trying to navigate the white square that represents Willy through the coloured blocks of the copy-protection screen is nearly impossible." —JODI

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The goal of Videoplace was not to create an art work that happened to be interactive, but to raise interactivity itself to the level of an art medium. This required redefining the human interface so that the system perceived the movements of participants' bodies rather than receiving commands from them via traditional input devices. Upon enter the "Videoplace" installation, visitors are confronted with their own images projected into a simple graphic scene in which everthing that occurs is a response to their actions.

Visitors can interact with 25 different programs or interaction patterns. A switch from one program to another usually takes place when a new person steps in front of the camera. The end goal is to develop a program capable of learning independently.

 

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Think of the people now is a Commodore Amiga hyper-media computer programme, based on the theme of a media reported event from the 1990 Remembrance Ceremony in Whitehall, London. A young man ran out from the crowd and set fire to himself and shouted the words "think about the people now" in protest against the ceremony. The media account that followed discussed the event in extreme trivial terms, failing to report anything but minor details and accounting only for the stress felt by the Royal Family and Politicians present. The Amiga hyper-media programme recreates the event through the media reports, trivializing and critiquing the British press. This work was produced as part of the final MFA degree show for The University of Reading in 1991. It was awarded the Golden Nica Award Prix Ars Electronica that year. Think of the people now was exhibited at Eyebeam Atelier as part of the Prix Selection Exhibition.

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America’s Finest (1993-5) utilizes an M-16 rifle and manipulated optics to question the identity of agressor and victim and the role played by images of war in the psyche of the observer. The work enacted the idea of Étienne Jules Marey's camera-gun, already implicit in Room of One's Own, her third interactive work created in 1990.  America's Finest was shown as part of the Prix Selection exhibition at Eyebeam Atelier.

Hershman Leeson is an Emeritus Professor of Digital Art in the Techno Cultural Studies Program at the University of California, Davis, and an A.D. White Professor at Large at Cornell University, the highest honor bestowed by that institution.

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Kazuhiko Hachiya’s Inter Dis-Communication Machine, composed of a video camera, transmitters, head mounted displays, batteries, and feathers is a communication system aimed at transmitting and receiving sensual experiences.

Used by two people wearing head-mounted displays, the ‘machine’ projects one wearer’s sight and sound perception of the environment into the other one’s display, thus confusing the borders between the identities of ‘you’ and ‘me’.

The Inter Dis-Communication Machine allows its wearers to ‘enter’ each other’s body and perception without being able to influence it.  This work was exhibited as part of the Prix Selection exhibition at Eyebeam Atelier.

 

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Designing interfaces between vegetal and device-related systems, between man and machine, is one of the greatest challenges of interactive technology. No differently than in the industrial context, here too, the use of intuitive and user-friendly control tendencies is supremely decisive. With Interactive Plant Growing, Sommerer and Mignonneau demonstrate an artwork of this species. Activating the plant triggers an image-generating impulse. This calls for neither the preparing of a symbolically conveyed action, nor the designing of ergonomically-formed pieces of equipment to make its control possible. The juxtaposing of the real plant and a computer-generated version of nature latently recalls explosive themes that arose when discussing the use of research results in the fields of natural science and technology.

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n-cha(n)t is an audio visual installation that allows participants to eavesdrop on or infiltrate the conversational patterns of a networked community of computers.  Inspiration for the work came from a strong and somewhat inexplicable desire to hear a community of computers speaking together: chattering amongst themselves, musing, intoning chants.  n-cha(n)t was exhibited as part of Prix Selection at Eyebeam Atelier.

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Bondage is a piece about enigma drawing on mystery and fantasy. It is digital in nature, but analog on the surface. The artist uses wood and paper as a vehicle for digital image and sound projecting a Japanese woman in a kimono onto a sliding paper shoji screen. The sounds are sine-waves, but not in a typical ultra-clean design space. The viewer’s presence completes the loop, uncovering parts of Nobuyoshi Araki’s original photograph, scanned left to right in frequency bands producing sound. The quadraphonic sound system is oriented vertically in the plane of the paper screen. The fibers of the paper give an organic surface for the digital pixels. The result is a total environment, a concentrated space where sound meets image, but where interaction is not pushed to the fore. Instead, he attempts to create a magical space, drawing upon the voyeuristic fantasies of the viewer.

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Steina plays the violin,the video, and is the performer so that in intermediary ways the observer and the observed converge. The languages of the two media, music and video, are interconnected according to their abstractness where the sound creates the waveforms of the image. Music is visually explored as a medium developing temporal and spatial features: not only does the sound spread the scan lines so that they become horizontally visible thereby exploring temporal dimensionality, but Steina also uses the Scan Processor to modulate the soundwaves until they build up spatial forms of the image. Through the Scan Processor, brighter parts of the "image" are lifted so that the horizontal lines also vertically deflect and create sculptural pattern. This work was exhibited as part of the What Sound Does a Color Make? exhibition at Eyebeam Atelier.

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Noisefields uses a Video Sequencer to switch between two video sources to create flickering effects in a self-reflexive interplay of visual input. The imagery presented refers to its detecting of electronic signals and does not carry any other information, except that the Colorizer is used for variation. The circular form introduces a simple division into an inner and an outer field of interrelated pulsation, so that on the whole, the "content" of this work is an audiovisual modulation of "video noise."  This piece was exhibited at Eyebeam Atelier as part of the What Sound Does a Color Make? exhibition.