Recent Projects

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Freefarmfeed is an automatic twitter feed from weather stations at various sites around the world designed to provide instant local weather updates for urban farms and food gardens.

 

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In the summer of 1781, James Armistead Lafayette was the sneakiest man in America.  He earned this dubious distinction providing intelligence.  Against impossible odds, James succeeded, liberating our insurgent forefathers from the British Empire.  Spook™ is a multimedia installation project, in-progress, based on James’ true story as a double-agent for America’s first Director of Central Intelligence, George Washington.

The installation "Spook™ Experiment" will consist of numerous elements:  HD video production equipment; Documentary 18th century images, hand-made forensic, drawings, reconstructions & abstractions;  the screenplay “In Spook’s Clothing" (© armstead 2007) and research documents.  These media items will be staged as a film set.  This life-sized tableau, handmade, drawn and constructed by the artist, will render an immersive abstraction of the espionage landscape that James navigated.  The constructed space will be flexible and extensible, allowing the artist to stage espionage happenings.

The espionage happenings of "Spook™ Experiment" will be scheduled events.  Using the feature length screenplay "In Spook’s Clothing," professional actors, passersby and museum visitors will reenact James' historic achievements by reading for the role of James or George Washington, if they choose.  They may choose any scene or the artist may suggest one.

Spook™: Experiment integrates actors and regular people into the same, free form cattle-call process and film production.  It dissolves the American Revolution’s mythology and replaces it with a serial act; hundred’s of people, inhabiting James' peculiar role, an invisible agent, in the midst of a bloody insurgency.

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Resident artist Jon Cohrs has created a device for striking it rich by prospecting for oil in the city center. Using old metal detectors, hydrocarbon sensors, locative media, and hype, this project combines a DIY aesthetic, basic accessible electronics, and pop culture to re-invigorate urban exploration and prospecting. Riding on the coat tails of the current subculture of prospecting and the historical precedent of the Gold Rush, the aim is to encourage a tongue-in-cheek urban oil rush.

Instructions on how to make the device will be made available online, and news of oil strikes in cities around the world will be projected as a Twitter feed in the gallery space. The device is both a real technological accomplishment, and an artistic 'conceptual object' which challenges us to reassess our greed and dependence on oil. http://urbanprospecting.net is a featured project on Instructables.com

The project is a result of Cohr's winning a Futuresonic 2009 Art Award Commission.

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Ingen Titel is an animated still life created by Veronica Skogberg during her year-long fellowship in Eyebeam's Production Studio.

The photorealistic computer graphic environments in Ingen Titel reference the composition and lighting of traditional painted still lifes. By incorporating subtle animation into object textures and details, and introducing the element of time, Skogberg embeds the possibility of narrative in the images. Ingen Titel plays with the different ways audiences view still versus moving images, based on visual languages set up in film and painting. The animations were created using Maya, Mental Ray and After Effects.

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After decades of running her kinky Syrian lingerie store in the Hamidiya souk of Damascus, Teta Haniya comes to America bearing gifts. With over 60 years of Islamic teachings on seduction, and an arsenal of kitschy electronics, Teta Haniya hijacks the western panty, triggering the sexual liberation of the American woman.

 

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If everyone took the passwords off their wifi, we'd have a free, citywide wireless network. Sound like a good idea? Then help us make it happen!

Eyebeam's Open Cultures Research Group ran workshops in which participants were trained—in order for them to be able to train others—to open up a wifi network so that it is free, accessible, and secure for others while maintaining your bandwidth.  They also set up a web site to document the process and share the knowledge.

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“How to Win” is a work in progress by Stephen Duncombe, an academic, and Steve Lambert, an artist. We are both long-time political activists and both of us believe that using art and culture to transform the world is a good idea. But we are both haunted by the same question: How do we gauge the success of our projects? Hell, how do we even think about success when our goal is utopia?

This site is a place to explore this and related questions. It is an evolving repository for our research. While far from a finished product, we’re offering it as an open window into our process.

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Nina Katchadourian's The Recovery Channels consists of footage from loose video tape collected off the streets of New York starting in 1998. The video tape is often found hanging in ribbons from trees, wrapped around lampposts, around fire escapes, on traffic islands etc. After being meticulously cleaned, restored and wound back into cassette shells, the footage is digitized and each "find" of tape becomes one of the "recovery channels." The viewer then uses a remote control to channel surf this television which contains cast off, unwanted, or perhaps shamefully thrown away material. The Recovery Channels comprises over 14 hours of footage on 38 different channels. The diverse material includes a Chinese action movie, hip hop videos, a ballet, an educational video on geriatric depression, an episode of Barney, and professional as well as amateur pornography. Videotape is gradually disappearing as VHS players become exinct in favor of digital technologies, and so The Recovery Channels also serves as a kind of local urban archeology.
Television, laptop, remote control, 16 hours of footage transferred from collected videotape, 2005.
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UNDER FIRE is an ongoing art and research project that explores militarization and political violence. It delves into the structural, symbolic, and affective dimensions of armed conflicts: the organization, representation, and materialization of war.

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Synaptic Bliss: Villette is a 4 channel video/audio installation that presents a re-composed techno garden that evokes the seasons and the cycles of life. It is a world halfway between organic and digital, where the subtle play on scale blurs the boundaries between the microscopic and the microscopic, as well as between interior and exterior.