Recent Projects

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This is an attempt to implement the Lib-Ray video collection standard created by Terry Hancock. It's designed to present HD video at a quality comparable to Blu-ray, in an open format that plays in any standards-based web browser (that means Chrome, Firefox, or Safari, but not Internet Explorer).  It's literally just some pages of HTML, a little JavaScript, and a folder full of video files. You can also use any Lib-Ray collection as a template to distribute your own  videos, or add more functionality using JavaScript frameworks.

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The Rhythmanalysis Lab is concerned with the observation, representation, and interpretation of rhythms in everyday life. Inspired by the work of Henri Lefebvre, it is a framework for projects, workshops, and investigations at the intersection of urban research, sound, and data science.


Will the (future) rhythmanalyst ... set up and direct a lab where one compares documents: graphs, frequencies and various curves? ... Just as he borrows and receives from his whole body and all his senses, so he receives data from all the sciences: psychology, sociology, ethnology, biology; and even physics and mathematics ... He will come to 'listen' to a house, a street, a town, as an audience listens to a symphony.

- Henri Lefebvre, "The Rhythmanalyst: A Previsionary Portrait" in Rhythmanalysis: Space, Time and Everyday life. New York City: Continuum, 2004. Pg. 22.

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Forty-eight to Sixteen documents my daily commute from Brooklyn to midtown Manhattan with sensors for my heartrate, breathing, and the cadence of my pedaling, along with chest-mounted video. Cellist Topu Lyo interprets my experience via a composition I derived from the sources that is precisely timed with the video. I am interested in 'performing' data and my and Topu's divergent but equally physical relationship to the information. Additionally, the physiological basis of empathy has implications for recent trends in media culture toward first-person viewpoints and the integration of biometrics into documentary. (Named after the gear ratio of my bike.) 

http://brianhouse.net/works/forty_eight_to_sixteen/

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Drowning NYC is a transmedia storytelling; an experimental pilot of a story that is told by actors and narrative devices staged over the Internet and in public spaces of a few selected New York City neighborhoods. The story informs the audiences about rising sea levels due to global warming and how urban populations will cope with it. The genre is theorized by the artist as Recombinant Fiction, a political and pervasive form of transmedia fiction.
This project proposes new pedagogical instruments, innovative activist strategies, elaborate media experiments, cutting-edge forms of theatre and cinema, questions about reality perception/construction.

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This project proposes an alternative financial model based on Peer-to-Peer architecture for a more equal sharing of wealth in society. It offers an innovative participative system using counterfeited virtual money. By issuing a visionary counterfeited type of VISA credit card, the project introduces the Gift Finance system based on People-to-People free credit shared across digital networks. The Gift Finance is a democratic creation of money directly regulated by ordinary people in order to redistribute wealth in society. The website P2PGiftCredit.com allows people to generate unique virtual card numbers to send to others via digital devices and platforms.

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Zajal is a programming language designed to reduce the friction between creative vision and functioning software. Live coding allows artists to improvise code and experiment freely, turning programming into an act of sculpture rather than architecture. Zajal's simple consistent syntax works hard to get out of the way of creativity, while its Ruby foundations expose coders to an immense world of existing code, discussions, and documentation.

Live coding is at the heart of the Zajal experience. Changes are applied to the running sketch without restarting whenever possible. This allows coders to experiment like never before, and also encourages the healthy habit of making small, incremental changes. It allows for truly instant feedback on your ideas, making Zajal a lot of fun to use and learn. 

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Swordfight is a two player physical game played using strap on Atari 2600 controllers. The goal of the game is to press your opponent's button with your joystick before they press yours.

The game was a collaboration with Kurt Bieg, who originated the idea.

The placement and nature of the controllers combined with the rules forces players into awkward positions that would be unacceptable in any other context. Because of the understanding that everyone is playing a game, friends and strangers become willing to interact in a way they never would. Swordfight is a celebration of the magic circle created by games that allow us to temporarily redefine societal rules through play.

The controllers are made of authentic strapon harnesses with hacked Atari controllers mounted in them. A custom circuit detects button presses and plays a tone for seven seconds, registering a hit. Instructions for assembly are made available on the site.

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OurGoods.org is a barter network that connects artists, designers, and activists to trade skills, spaces, and objects. OurGoods exists so that creative people can help each other produce independent projects. Co-founded by Carl Tashian, Louise Ma, Rich Watts, Jen Abrams, and Caroline Woolard in 2009, OurGoods is an ongoing project that influences Caroline's work as a Fellow at Eyebeam.

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The RGBDToolkit is an open source platform for volumetric filmmaking that utilizes a hacked Kinect depth sensor paired with a DSLR video camera to creates a unique hybrid form of three dimensional video. The toolkit allows experimentation with a new paradigm of filmmaking where 3D models derived from large image datasets allow for choosing perspectives after the fact, merging photography and 3D animation.

The RGB+D tumblr (http://rgbd.tumblr.com) showcases on going research from the artists developing the software while they create their work.

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In Stranger Visions artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates portrait sculptures from analyses of genetic material collected in public places. Working with the traces strangers unwittingly leave behind, Dewey-Hagborg calls attention to the impulse toward genetic determinism and the potential for a culture of genetic surveillance.