Recent Projects

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The Co-op Bar offers a low-level investment and community space in the form of a co-operatively owned bar. Investors contribute bottles of liquor and receive a return on their investment and a discount at the bar. As an artist or supporter of the arts, when you buy a drink at the Co-op Bar you are putting money back into the local arts community. A percentage of the profits from the bar go toward supporting mini-grants given directly to artists, the production of artist publications, and other services.

As of 2007, The Co-op Bar was able to raise roughly $2000 in mini-grants for artists.

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For the connection between hands and digital data, a
software/hardware-based modular user interface was created.
The interactive surface senses touch, multiple contact points, allowing
for multi-finger dual-hand forms of
interaction. The software visualizes and represents the data emulating
physical characteristics that align with tactile expectations of the
user.

More information can be found: http://nortd.com/cubit/

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Instructions on how to talk to anyone, written by hand. Based on an earlier project. Simple instructions, easy to follow.

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Invisible Threads is a mixed reality performance installation created by Eyebeam artists Jeff Crouse and Stephanie Rothenberg. The project explores the growing intersection between labor, emerging virtual economies and real life commodities through the creation of a designer jeans sweatshop in the metaverse Second Life (SL). Simulating a real life manufacturing facility that includes hiring SL “workers” to produce real world jeans sold for profit, the project provides an insider’s view into current modes of global, telematic production.

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TouchKit is a modular multitouch development kit with the aim to make multitouch readily available in an open source fashion to the masses.  It is a sister project of the CUBIT multitouch system and aimed at rapid implementation of multitouch projects.

 

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Bombs (from 2d mat board) were be placed in iconic locations of bomb threats in hopes of opening a discussion of what is terrorism vs. fear and how interchangeable are the words. Where is the line between rational and unrational occur? How does a society begin to learn to cope with the unknown by being logical?

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The text is currently being pulled from xml into openframworks dynamically displaying in real time peoples answers to the question ‘what would you take if you could only take one object out of a fire?’

the interface is then being projected onto a wooden board where I have laser cut a floorplan of the typical american house. The answers shift around depending on activity on the blog and gender specific answers (boys are black, girls pink).

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"the marionettes" is a networked puppet installation created with the new standalone (and soon opensourced) version of moviesandbox and displayed for the eyebeam reception for the shanghai media art fair symposium in new york

Two networked puppets can be controlled by hardware marionette controllers. Participants can interact with each other through their puppets without seeing each other in person.

The controllers are a bit more sophisticated right now, albeit not really tweaked enough in terms of distances etc... There are some more picture on flickr here.

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Bare CFL bulbs give off harsh light. Soften it with the Bright Idea Shade.

The Bright Idea Shade is a project of the Eyebeam OpenLab, by Sustainability Action Group members Michael Mandiberg and Steve Lambert, with Simon Jolly, Peter Duyan, and Oscar Torres. We are converting all of our silver tipped incandescent bulbs into CFL bulbs (as they burn out.) The problem is a bare CFL bulb gives off very harsh light. So we set about designing a lampshade for the bulbs. We started with the Universal Polygon Lampshade and made it fit a CFL bulb, built it out of heat resistant photo diffuser material (found a diffuser material that could be laser cut, and built a laser cutter template.)

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Openframeworks is a c++ library designed to assist the creative process by providing a simple and intuitive framework for experimentation.

The library is designed to work as a general purpose glue, and wraps together several commonly used libraries under a tidy interface: openGL for graphics, rtAudio for audio input and output, freeType for fonts, freeImage for image input and output, quicktime for video playing and sequence grabbing.

The code is written to be both cross platform and cross compiler. The API is designed to be minimal and easy to grasp. There are very few classes, and inside of those classes, there are very few functions. The code has been implemented so that within the classes there are minimal cross-referening, making it quite easy to rip out and reuse, if you need, or to extend.

Simply put, openFrameworks is a tool that makes it much easier to make things via code.

OpenFrameworks is actively developed by Zachary Lieberman and Theodore Watson along with help from the OF community.