Recent Projects

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EarthSpeaker was the result of Jeff Feddersen's residency during which time he researched and prototyped solar-powered, distributed, autonomous, sculptural acoustic and radio wave transmitters, as well as developed content for them. The transmitters will be used in a permanent outdoor installation at free103point9’s Wave Farm in Acra, NY, tentatively scheduled for next summer. His residency will also result in a toolkit for artists, activists and technologist seeking to incorporate solar technologies in their work.

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Aphrodite Project: Platforms is an interactive artwork that combines the rich mythology of Aphrodite, the priestesses/prostitutes of ancient
Greece, with the advertising and safety concerns of contemporary sex workers in the streets, providing technological access to people for whom it would not normally be available. Video and installation artist Norene Leddy, ( http://www.nobetty.net) is working with new media artist and physical computing expert Andrew Milmoe (http://www.milmoe.com) to prototype sandals for sex workers that utilize the latest wireless and GPS technology in order to enhance their job performance and ensure their safety while working. The sandal prototype will be embedded with an LCD screen, GPS receiver, radio beacon and speakers. Leddy will also create a web site that allows the sex worker to customize the sandals and offers a secure community network with email, chat room and “problem client” blog. For more information visit http://www.nobetty.net/platforms

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Modern Orthodox is a working demonstration of my next-generation laser eruv system. An eruv (pronounced ey-roov) is a symbolic boundary erected around religious Jewish communities throughout the world. While an eruv is typically constructed with poles and wires, Modern Orthodox employs a combination of low-power lasers, wifi surveillance cameras and graffiti, as a way of designating sacred volumes of space in urban areas.

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Schengen with ease 'Extra-comunitarios', or citizens of non-European countries, have the 'extra' bureaucratic task of changing their status, to one that will allow them to move and work 'freely' within the European Union. The length and complexity of this process can vary depending on the type of 'extra-comunitario' in question. Almost everyone agrees that bureaucracy is the most boring thing on the world. Time spent in waiting rooms and lines is not considered as a part of living, but an interference, daily life put on hold, with the hope that, when it's all over, it will be possible to take up 'real' life again as though nothing had ever happened. It is wasted, meaningless time that has to be erased as soon as the new status is achieved - in the case that process was successful. A card with a number becomes the key to freedom and the desire for it grows stronger as the bureaucratic process, transition, irresolution, legislative limbo or whatever becomes longer and more convoluted. If it's true that we learn from life by living it, what teaches us this most boring experience? Queue better? Be more severe, obedient, or lie to the authorities better? And how did we come to this that a piece of paper can provide us freedom? Schengen with ease is a compilation of material from a variety of official and non-official sources, brought together to explain how daily practices are affected by the application of the EU Foreign Legislation and the Schengen Agreement in the territory of the European Union. Adopting the Assimil method (Alphonse Cherel, Paris, 1929) this book gives a systematic study of all the bureaucratic steps a non-EU citizen might face while trying to obtain EU status. All the required steps are taught through lessons like those found in foreign language skill books, comparing the administrative language of European immigration legislation to an unknown language that has to be mastered first in order to assimilate in to a new environment, receiving deter...

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Casa Segura is a sustainable and Internet-enabled shelter to be deployed in the Sonoran desert. This prototype is intended to explore the possibility of creating life-saving beacons in an otherwise hostile landscape, enabling private property owners to help foster a humane border and creating a platform for understanding the motivations and stories of the thousands of migrants who make this dangerous trek through the desert. For this project Robert will collaborate with architects Paola Sanguinetti and Blake Goble, as well as emerging artist Ryan Moran

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The Recognition Amplifier (Famous Machine). A machine capable of increasing the fame of of a human being placed inside it. Research abandoned due to physical danger.

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During her residency, Jill developed a series of projects based on experiences working the night-shift with a police officer who she has been shadowing, off the record.
Multimedia Installation: Printed book; MTA CCTV dvd's, sound works, objects, and framed digital photographs.

"Last winter I came back to New York City after living five years abroad. I rented an apartment in Brooklyn and took the subway often. Everyone is in transit, except the officers. I approached one and asked him to search me. I began to accompany this officer on many of his nighttime posts. He was not sure if he could trust me, and I was not sure if I should trust him. We continued to meet despite this.
I kept record of our meetings and logged them in different forms." Jill Magid

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"Urban Attractors and Private Distractors" will explore custom and behavior in relation to culturally determined understandings and distinctions between concepts of public/private and inside/outside in physical space/cyberspace. Eng’s project will include local workshops and online collaborations with groups of young people in NYC.

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The Project
From 2001-2002, the Environmental Protection Agency collected extensive environmental data from the World Trade Center site and nearby areas in Manhattan, Brooklyn and New Jersey. The EPA no longer publishes daily summaries. For their Social Sculpture Commission, Preemptive Media, a collective of artists, activists, and technologists, will develop portable AIR (Area’s Immediate Reading) kits designed to measure and record exposure to pollutants over the course of a day. These kits will collect data on major pollutants in the area such as carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen dioxide, lead and noise. The resulting data and creative visualizations will be accessible and free to the public through a website and visitor center in Lower Manhattan. Preemptive Media’s AIR kits, and resulting website and visitor center, will be an alternative and self-monitoring system created to be maintained and used by the people who live, work and visit the area.

Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) and Eyebeam announce the arts collaborative Preemptive Media as recipients of the 2005 Social Sculpture Commission (SSC). Through the upcoming year, Preemptive Media will prototype portable air quality measurement kits and work with the community to build and deploy the kits, monitor various air pollutants in Lower Manhattan, as well as create data visualizations of their findings. This project and the SSC are intended to develop a new process oriented, socially based artwork that integrates the community into the creation and presentation of the work and affects the world around them. This is the inaugural Social Sculpture Commission, offered jointly by LMCC and Eyebeam.

The Social Sculpture Commission
The Social Sculpture Commission was created to support interdisciplinary, socially engaged art works that feature creative practitioners working collaboratively with the community.  The concept of Social Sculpture was coined in the 1970's by Joseph Beuys to refer to creative acts that engage with the community and respond to the world around them. Thinking of the artistic practice as participatory, these ideas were rooted in the belief in the collective versus the individual and the engagement of a larger community into the creation and presentation of the work. Eyebeam and LMCC conceived of this commission to explore how contemporary artists/ collectives are exploring and translating this concept through contemporary technologies and means of communication.

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¨There was much climbing over and under various obstructions, but the line felt amazingly serene. It was like a secret world above all the traffic and the noise… The next time you are walking down in Chelsea, think about the secret world above your head. It's worth keeping the line just so people can dream about it.¨
--Jake Dobkin, 2002 (comments from one of many grass-routes websites documenting the High Line in words and images)

Liisa Roberts, a recipient of the Oscar M. Ruebhausen Commission, will work with Eyebeam's Production Studios to create a series of short films based on individual New Yorkers' experiences and visions of the long abandoned, elevated, west-side railroad line, known as the High Line. The films will attempt to document the unique personal significance the High Line has held for many residents as a kind of secret garden, at a time when the High Line's identity and physical structure are being transformed into that of a public venue.

In previous projects such as the sound installation 'Sidewalk,' created for ArtPace in San Antonio, TX in 1999, and in the community based multi-media project 'What’s the Time in Vyborg?' initiated in 2000, Roberts has worked with the representation of subjective factors which shape a community's perception of urban monuments.

In this project, Roberts would like to help preserve private histories of those who have encountered the High Line in the past, to create a living archaeology that will allow visitors to the renovated Line to experience the site in uniquely personal ways. Her collaborators will be selected from people who attend High Line community meetings. The short films they create will give form to a fleeting sense of connection to place, which is part memory, part fiction and part wishful projection, to give public expression to the undocumented history of a New York City landmark.