Recent Projects

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"Into the Air's Memory" is a two channel computer animation. It explores the romanticism of transcendence through technological means. The story is set in a desert where every inhabitant searches for an unknown sound that is believed to exist. An elusive acquaintance begins between a sound seeker who listens to the memories of the dead and a woman who wanders aimlessly with an empty wheelchair. Lives come to existence with the unquenchable desire to hear the unheard, to grasp the intangibles, and disintegrate in the end, with only the air as an eternal witness.

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Rosenthal's After-School Atelier middle school course, Acoustic Ecology and Soundscape Recording, exposed participants to a wide range of ideas, techniques and technologies for focusing and sensitizing aural awareness of the world. Listeners consider how enhancing this aural awareness can alter their relationship to the urban environment and what impact human sound-making has on that environment. Rosenthal's students developed self-reflective aural archives using the sounds of their homes, neighborhoods, families and friends.

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Caspar Stracke's video installation consists of a continuous rotating wide screen image that is interweaving two cityscapes, juxtaposing idiosyncratic appearances from four locations while making connections between architecture and sociology of two non-related places. The impossibility to be in two places at the same time is the origin for an investigation on locality. How do objects, buildings people of two local sites relate to each other when uprooted from their context? On several sites, objects from New York, Mexico City, Berlin and Shanghai find their counterpart.

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In Re-Surface: The Facade of the Synthetic, KnoWear posits the concept that Post-Modern identity has turned from identifying with the body as a natural organism to the idea of the body as a synthetic product. Hypercritical to advertising and the media's impact on this idea, The Facade of the Synthetic features moving images in video form called ‘Body Billboards’, small electronic areas of advertisements placed on the skin surface, formed to follow the contours of the human body and inspired by classic tattoos hybridized with every day product brand names and logos. The Facade of the Synthetic utilizes OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) screens, a thin flexible display technology that receives and displays video input, incorporated with an installation of sampled and edited advertising campaigns projected on to the gallery walls, creating an ever-changing kaleidoscope of background images and noise.

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Flying Spy Potatoes uses oversized silver helium "infoballoons" equipped with miniature wireless cameras to question perceptions of our urban environment.The urban space of New York City played a vital role in the works develpoment as Marketou spent considerable time during 2003 making public interventions by walking through major portals, train platforms and places of transit in New York City while recording the vertical, vision of the bird's eye view through a wireless camera mounted and hidden in an oversize silver helium balloon held at the end of a 30 feet tether. Marketou's three channel video installation features past interventions using the balloons at Grand Central Station and the World Trade Center mixed with a live feed from gallery visitors who accept missions with them in a on-going game to investigating the neighborhood. Eyebeam serves as "headquarters" as the audience will find information, maps, CDs,video cassettes and other project info as well as information about the missions and "landing sites". Daily sign-ups for gaming Tuesday through Saturday through the run of the exhibition.

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Offshore invokes waves of both water and air that, once made, ripple outward through space and time. Rebroadcasts of archival, original and found audio accompany an installation of scale reproductions of the 1960’s Radio City oil rig forts along with video from the international waters where this historic flowering of pirate radio occurred.

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September Dream is a four-channel video produced as part of Speak of Me as I Am, Fred Wilson's mixed media installation created for the US Pavilion at the 50th Venice Biennale (June-November 2003). The project explored how Africans have been historically represented in Venetian fine and decorative arts, including painting, photography decorative arts and jewelry.

The story of Othello, the Moor of Venice, is central to the story of Venice during the Renaissance. September Dream references four operatic and theatrical productions of Shakespeare's Othello, where the Moor's role was played by white actors. The piece focuses on the climactic death scene, editing and reversing the final sequence where Othello kills his white Venetian lover, Desdemona. The resulting video cites the history of colonialism's violence, as well as contemporary nostalgia to return to an earlier, more simple time. Eyebeam's grant of services has enable Fred Wilson to digitally manipulate and edit found footage to create September Dream.

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Rebekah Rutkoff worked with her After School Atelier high school students on the project Experiments in Documentation. Working from the notion that raw materials for art making can always be found close-at-hand, students assembled a body of material that represented their personal and communal spaces. Utilizing these found objects with Premiere and Photoshop software, these students investigated digital video as a medium and created pieces of moving poetry.

Rutkoff is an artist and curator living in Brooklyn. Her work in photography and video art has been shown internationally. In 2001 she co-founded the Jaraf video art screening series in New York City. She is at work on an ongoing project that blurs the line between art-making and curatorial practices entitled Color Therapy for Oedipal Conflicts.

 

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PDPal (2002)
mixed media (infrared beaming kiosk for Palm Pilots, interactive Palm application, bus stop shelter with two 67

PDPal is a public art project built around the PDA (personal digital assistant), using it as a mediating and recording device that reactivates our everyday actions, transforming them into a dynamic portrait of our urban experience. At the core of the PDPal application is an "Urban Park Ranger"(UPR) - an individual software persona who, once downloaded into a PDA, encourages the owner to log her momentary experiences (actions, proximities, and perceptual phenomena) in iconic broad strokes as she moves about her environment. The UPR helps to create personal and idiosyncratic maps of our "Temporary Personal Urbanisms." PDPal provides the tools to create maps as place-based memory shells or to stand in as a narrative shorthand, marking personal intervals of place and experience, which can be uploaded to a central website and shared as a kind of "communicity" blog.

PDPal was commissioned by Creative Time with additional support from the Walker Art Center. Technology provided by Palm, Inc. with additional support from hi beam. Beaming station designed by ORG. Thanks to: Jake Barton, Nancy Nowacek, Mark Podlaseck, Carol Stakenas, Sara Diamond, Steve Dietz, Anne Pasternak, Duggal, hi beam, Palm, and ORG.

Marina Zurkow is a polymedia artist whose work draws from character development and narrative inquiry in several contexts: the animated cartoon, the physical object, interactive space, and printed graphics. The physical objects that Zurkow makes address how her characteriological and pictogrammic languages can reside in the zones between digital and analog spaces, and between the handmade and the computer-made worlds.

Scott Paterson is an architect whose work seeks the possibility for "architecture" as a protocol between the virtual and the real, as an interface between the activity of our daily lives and the space of the internet.

Julian Bleecker did the programming for PDPAl. Bleecker is a technologist who works with technology as culture, writing both the machine and narrative codes that reveal provocative human/nonhuman entanglements.

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"Seams" is an animated short depicting a character with everchanging designs on her skin. With the creation of this piece, my main goal was to focus on complex animated texturing of the CG model. I used the character's body as a canvas, with her flesh presenting endless possibilities for design. By using charcoal on newsprint to achieve a very handrawn and dirty feel, I was able to make a usually static surface become believable as one that is easily smudged or drawn over. My goal for this piece was to explore the fusion of fine art with computer graphics and to create an abstract reality in which these elements coexist.