Recent Projects

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Offshore invokes waves of both water and air that, once made, ripple outward through space and time. Rebroadcasts of archival, original and found audio accompany an installation of scale reproductions of the 1960’s Radio City oil rig forts along with video from the international waters where this historic flowering of pirate radio occurred.

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September Dream is a four-channel video produced as part of Speak of Me as I Am, Fred Wilson's mixed media installation created for the US Pavilion at the 50th Venice Biennale (June-November 2003). The project explored how Africans have been historically represented in Venetian fine and decorative arts, including painting, photography decorative arts and jewelry.

The story of Othello, the Moor of Venice, is central to the story of Venice during the Renaissance. September Dream references four operatic and theatrical productions of Shakespeare's Othello, where the Moor's role was played by white actors. The piece focuses on the climactic death scene, editing and reversing the final sequence where Othello kills his white Venetian lover, Desdemona. The resulting video cites the history of colonialism's violence, as well as contemporary nostalgia to return to an earlier, more simple time. Eyebeam's grant of services has enable Fred Wilson to digitally manipulate and edit found footage to create September Dream.

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Rebekah Rutkoff worked with her After School Atelier high school students on the project Experiments in Documentation. Working from the notion that raw materials for art making can always be found close-at-hand, students assembled a body of material that represented their personal and communal spaces. Utilizing these found objects with Premiere and Photoshop software, these students investigated digital video as a medium and created pieces of moving poetry.

Rutkoff is an artist and curator living in Brooklyn. Her work in photography and video art has been shown internationally. In 2001 she co-founded the Jaraf video art screening series in New York City. She is at work on an ongoing project that blurs the line between art-making and curatorial practices entitled Color Therapy for Oedipal Conflicts.

 

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PDPal (2002)
mixed media (infrared beaming kiosk for Palm Pilots, interactive Palm application, bus stop shelter with two 67

PDPal is a public art project built around the PDA (personal digital assistant), using it as a mediating and recording device that reactivates our everyday actions, transforming them into a dynamic portrait of our urban experience. At the core of the PDPal application is an "Urban Park Ranger"(UPR) - an individual software persona who, once downloaded into a PDA, encourages the owner to log her momentary experiences (actions, proximities, and perceptual phenomena) in iconic broad strokes as she moves about her environment. The UPR helps to create personal and idiosyncratic maps of our "Temporary Personal Urbanisms." PDPal provides the tools to create maps as place-based memory shells or to stand in as a narrative shorthand, marking personal intervals of place and experience, which can be uploaded to a central website and shared as a kind of "communicity" blog.

PDPal was commissioned by Creative Time with additional support from the Walker Art Center. Technology provided by Palm, Inc. with additional support from hi beam. Beaming station designed by ORG. Thanks to: Jake Barton, Nancy Nowacek, Mark Podlaseck, Carol Stakenas, Sara Diamond, Steve Dietz, Anne Pasternak, Duggal, hi beam, Palm, and ORG.

Marina Zurkow is a polymedia artist whose work draws from character development and narrative inquiry in several contexts: the animated cartoon, the physical object, interactive space, and printed graphics. The physical objects that Zurkow makes address how her characteriological and pictogrammic languages can reside in the zones between digital and analog spaces, and between the handmade and the computer-made worlds.

Scott Paterson is an architect whose work seeks the possibility for "architecture" as a protocol between the virtual and the real, as an interface between the activity of our daily lives and the space of the internet.

Julian Bleecker did the programming for PDPAl. Bleecker is a technologist who works with technology as culture, writing both the machine and narrative codes that reveal provocative human/nonhuman entanglements.

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"Seams" is an animated short depicting a character with everchanging designs on her skin. With the creation of this piece, my main goal was to focus on complex animated texturing of the CG model. I used the character's body as a canvas, with her flesh presenting endless possibilities for design. By using charcoal on newsprint to achieve a very handrawn and dirty feel, I was able to make a usually static surface become believable as one that is easily smudged or drawn over. My goal for this piece was to explore the fusion of fine art with computer graphics and to create an abstract reality in which these elements coexist.

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Day Night Day Night is about an aspiring young female suicide bomber. The project will be shot half in HDCAM and half in HDV and transferred to 35mm. Loktev calls the project, "an inaction movie" as it is ultimately a film where nothing actually happens.

A girl arrives in New York with plans to explode a backpack bomb in Times Square. She is young, speaks with no accent, has no identifiable ethnicity. We never see the bomb. We never learn why she made her decision, whom she represents, what she believes in; all we know is she believes that her intended act is not just right but righteous. The film takes place in a little over 24 hours, focusing on microscopic movements and smallest gestures. Once dispatched in her mission, alone for the first time, the film becomes a series of missteps and setbacks, trials and failures. Based very loosely on a possibly fictional newspaper story of a Chechen girl suicide bomber wandering around Moscow, a story that the real life suicide bomber later claimed she made up. Like both Dreyer’s or Bresson’s Joan of Arc, the film transpires on the girl’s face. The film is not so much about terrorism but about the tension between faith and failure, offering no answers, only questions.

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Eyebeam's Moving Image Studio created intricately layered computer animation for Mariko Mori's Wave UFO project. Conceived by the artist as a representation of "virtual travel to the infinitely connected world and further, into the inner world of the mind," the completed installation consists of a 30-by-9 foot pearlescent, teardrop-shaped pod in which three visitors at a time experienceing three visual "journeys" projected onto a domed screen above. The first journey creates a decent from the macrocosm of the universe, through the earth's atmosphere, into the pod, the viewers themselves, and finally into a microscopic dream world. The second journey, a rendering of the internal world, explores the collective power of the mind. In this section, sensors built into the pod record viewer's brain wave data and a custom computer software game engine translates this data into abstract animation. An idealized abstract visualization of the three minds working together is represented in the third journey.

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Theatrical designer Sumant Jayakrishnan creates an 80 foot day-glo map of the city of Manhattan.

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"The Kiss" is a short animation that focuses on storytelling and communication solely through the use of body language and character interaction as opposed to using scripted dialogue. To accent this aspect of my film I have chosen to use a non-photorealistic rendering technique. This will allow the viewer to look more at the story and motion involved than the fact that they are watching an animation.

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"Project Rustbucket" is a short segment depicting a charater of unusual qualities unexpectedly discovering a fantastic subterranean cavern containing long forgotten structured passages. Unfortunately the stumbled-upon secret is as quickly lost as it had been found. Modeling, rigging and animation are composed in Alias Wavefront's Maya. Source textures are taken from scans of real materials as well as digital photos from around New York City. The collected image textures are arranged in Adode Photoshop to correspond with the modeled geometry.