Recent Projects

VTE
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This piece is the outcome of research and experimentation conducted by students of the 'Collaborative Media Workshop.' This workshop, led by Andrew Demirjian at Eyebeam, introduced students to technical methods and aesthetic strategies for producing audiovisuals in spatialized art installations.

The students' final project, entitled VTE, is an algorithmically edited work composed of sound and video captured from various New York City elevators. Eight channels of rhythmic audio play while three projectors cast synced video onto a 10 ft. high cube.  The cube and periphonic audio system were developed in August 2011 by Jackson Moore.

 

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Gifpumper is collaborative web creation platform. 

 

Gifpumper combines elements of a social media site, blogging platform and virtual world into a single tool for collaborative creation online. Users can create 3d pages composed of 2d media elements (text, images, video, music) by rotating and positioning them in the XYZ coordinate plane.

All changes are broadcast in real-time to anyone else viewing the page. Users can interact with one another by adding, deleting and moving elements. The resulting pages can also be used as a blog or a personal website with a custom url. Standard social-media features are present as well in the form of a 'like' button, recent activity feed and profile pages. At any given moment users can see 'active pages' on the main site indicating presence of others.

 

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The Caloris Basin is a new technique for concentrating sunlight to useful temperatures. Presently the energy is used for cooking, and many more uses are possible. It is based on an excavated hemisphere in the ground, and so is significantly less expensive to produce than standard troughs and dishes. Materials research was done at eyebeam, and prototypes are being tested all over North America. Workshops have been held with Sweatshop in Tijuana, Mexico and in Coatzacoalcos, Mexico, with more planned internationally. BjornQorn is a New York based food company that is testing the technology on a commercial scale, to make popcorn.

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Wearable Weapons awaken the power of vulnerability. 

Wearable Weapons is currently building visual and interactive wearable costumes for an entertainer or singer to wear during a performance or music video.

Right now we are focusing on building a new series of collars with hacked Violet Wands connected to software that pulses mini-electrical arcs through voice interaction.  This is part of a larger series of interactive costumes built with different forms of electricity, fire, sound sensors, open source software, hardware, plant fibers, confiscated scissors from airport security, recycled razor blades, and zip ties.

You might ask... and what are Violet Wands?

Violet Wands are electro medical devices recommended by Edgar Cayce as a healing tool and invented by Nicola Tesla. Violet Wands are also modern, electrical, kink or highly erotic electro-stimulation tools.  They are used for the application of low current, high voltage (min 25 kV to max 65 kV), high-frequency, electricity to the body.  Violets Wands are sold both to the police department and the S&M community. The wands have a variety of intensity levels that do anything from burn to arouse the end receiver.

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On November 17th 2pm~4pm I was at the Union Square and marched For or Against friends and enemies. That day, a large group of students and activists gathered in Union Square to Zuccotti Park as part of Occupy movement. I brought two pickets that, one side have ‘My friends’ and another side have ‘My enemies’ and another picket have ‘there is no friend’ and another side of that picket  have ‘there is no enemy’. I engaged in coversation with strangers and friends with questions about the conditions of democracy and politics of friendship!  

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Baroque.me visualizes the first Prelude from Bach’s Cello Suites. Using the mathematics behind string length and pitch, it came from a simple idea: what if all the notes were drawn as strings? Instead of a stream of classical notation on a page, this interactive project highlights the music’s underlying structure and subtle shifts.

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Lumarca is a truly volumetric display which allows viewers to see three dimensional images and motion. The system requires only a computer, a projector, and common materials found at most hardware stores. This provides an affordable platform for artists to design compelling content that conveys information, narrative, and aesthetic information in a new way. Lumarca is a collaboration between Albert Hwang and Matt Parker.

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The Life Garden

The Life Garden is an anti-cancer medicinal and demonstration garden. Currently on display are our first attempts at growing various plants and herbs indoors that commonly need outdoor space in various different climate zones. 

Currently in development are an anti-cancer kitchen survival kit, a hydroponic community-based version of the edible parts of the garden, a series of performative nutritional lectures, and cooking workshops combined Alchemy Fun & Development (AFD) activities. 

 

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Dying for the Other is a video triptych addressing a situation of shared suffering involving mice used in breast cancer research, and humans afflicted with the same disease. In order to produce this video, da Costa documented scenes of her own life during the summer of 2011 and combined them with footage taken at a breast cancer research facility in New York City over the same time span.

Dying for the Other, is part of da Costa’s Cost of Life project series, currently being developed at Eyebeam and supported by the Creative Capital Foundation. 

 

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Sharon Mizrahi, Eyebeam Project Description of Short Film

Make Stuff Get Famous (written and directed by Student Resident Sharon Mizrahi) is a short film in the truest sense of the phrase, capping in at a curt two minutes and twenty seconds. Initially conceived as a plot-based “New York drama,” the film evolved into a non-linear piece laced with rich, nearly literary symbolism. The high contrast, black-and-white video features two male characters (both played by Fellow Fran Ilich) in vastly different contexts. Richard, a suit-clad professional, is heard gently pleading with his son on the phone in Times Square between business calls, and Adrian, an introspective booze-guzzler, delivers impromptu philosophy on the Highline while taking swigs out of a paper bag. Through Richard and Adrian, two sides of the urban spectrum are explored: the iconic “skyscraper-and-lights” glamour, and the comparatively unremarkable lives of those who keep the city running.      

The film is punctuated with shots of “the other side” of Times Square: the ordinary slices of life lurking between exaggerated tourist smiles and blaring marquee ads for Domino’s Pizza. A voiceover of Richard pacifying his young son is paired with scenes of frustrated urbanites speed-walking to the subway, cheery Broadway ticket-sellers in outlandish costumes, and ever-present taxicab traffic. Somber-eyed and quietly dramatic, Highline drunkard Adrian provides a bizarre sense of reprieve from the inner-city chaos. In the leafy confines of Manhattan’s miles-long, elevated parks, he gives quaint but poignant reflections on cigarettes and the weather. 

Richard and Adrian live in wholly different urban worlds: the former, in the wildly affable core of New York City, and the latter, in the cozy confines of a mock-suburban park. Make Stuff Get Famous initially reads as a stark juxtaposition between high-impact city life and quiet solitude—but perhaps these two extremes are not as foreign as they appear.