thoughts

Project Summary

The Real Costs is a Firefox web browser plug-in that inserts CO2 emissions data into airplane travel e-commerce websites such as Orbitz.com, United.com, Delta.com, and so on. Like the nutritional information labeling included on food packaging, this plug-in provides emissions information that is otherwise excluded from travel websites.

Artist Background

 

Academic institutions clinging to print media as arbiter of tenure, disregarding electronic forms are… “Dead-Tree-Huggers”

I tweeted this just now, but I feel like it deserves a bit more context. This came out of an email with Adam Hyde (his coinage!) trying to convince him or one of our collaborators in Berlin to find and scan a print version of this article about our collaborative book project. I have found that the committees reviewing my materials for tenure not only frown on all forms of online publication, they also frown on printed copies of electronic versions of documents even if they also appear in print. A scan of the meatspace dead-tree newspaper is viewed as significantly more “legitimate” than a screenshot of the same text from the newspaper’s website. They are Dead-Tree-Huggers.

 

Every Winter I am asked for advice on the academic job interview process from friends, adjuncts in my department, former students, etc. I have coached a number of them through the process and on to their first jobs. In the process I have put together a list of  advice.

Whenever I am asked, I never remember them all at once. And I seem to be asked more and more, so I am writing them all down here, to refer people to.

I should emphasize, that these are just opinions, not hard facts. Every situation is different. And this is primarily based off of experience in arts focused searches.

Advice on Academic Job Interviews

 

Watch the whole thing. Or at least the first 12 minutes. Its worth it. Fascinating. It is so familiar that I feel like I was shown this in grade school… alongside Powers of Ten.

Some things have changed since Ulrich Franzen made it: waterfronts are now viewed as more precious potential parks than he views the street. Putting a two mile long building on any waterfront would not work these days. Also, his vision of shared cars is starting to come true, with shared rentable cars now available in most cities, and bicycle share programs across Europe and heading stateside. I wondered if today’s political and economic culture could handle he importance and respond to the difficulty of such massive change; a review of Boston’s tragically executed and financially draining Big Dig would be a good case study in what can go wrong. All that said, I felt there were two things missing: Subways and Bicycles.

 

In early September I will be participating in New Amsterdam Bike Slam, Transportation Alternative’s co-sponsored bike think-tank as poetry-slam. As the description says:

Over three challenging rounds, each team will defend its proposals in front of a panel of expert judges and a live audience. At the end of the evening, the judges will declare a winner, with the most innovative and practical plan for making New York, and New Yorkers, more bicycle-friendly.

I’m brainstorming already, and I welcome suggestions about how to improve biking in downtown and the NY Harbor area. This is, of course, something near and dear to my heart as I commute by bike to CSI via the SI Ferry.

 

Brett Stallbaum has the best Auto Responder ever. I was going to reply to tell him, but… I would just get the auto responder again! Love it:

Dear all,

 

I had a long discussion with several of the Research Fellows at Eyebeam about the best way to make master design files available for download. Flickr wont take an AI file, PSDs are just too big, and god forbid you try to upload the master files for your 2 minute video anywhere… We ended up bringing Bre Pettis and Zach Hoeken of Thingiverse.com into the discussion. But concluded that Thingiverse was really focused on 3D modeling, laser cutters, and 3D Printing. They welcomed me to put my Illustrator master files up there, but we all kind of agreed that it was the wrong audience.

 

The Collected Memories of the Mechanical Turk

Project description

1. An overview

Amazon has a web service called the Mechanical Turk where you can have humans perform simple repetitive tasks for you. They call it “Artificial Artificial Intelligence.” I propose to document the inner life and experiences of the Amazon’s Mechanical Turk workforce by creating tasks that explore the personal memories of these workers, as our lives are transformed by cheap bandwidth and outsourcing that is made possible by the Internet

2. The People & The Project

 

Green Marketing in Wikipedia

Click the image for full res version

 

I am going through my things tagged “to blog” and this one seems timely. In June of 2008 the CRUMB list was dedicated to a discussion of collaboration.

 
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