arduino

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The Flower sketch with a glance at its code

Zajal is a programming language designed to reduce the friction between creative vision and functioning software. Live coding allows artists to improvise code and experiment freely, turning programming into an act of sculpture rather than architecture. Zajal's simple consistent syntax works hard to get out of the way of creativity, while its Ruby foundations expose coders to an immense world of existing code, discussions, and documentation.

Project Created: 
June 2012
 
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Kate Watkins has an eye for the unique and beautiful. She has a background in painting and graphic design but fled to NY to pursue a MFA in Design + Technology at Parsons The New School for Design. She combines her eye for detail and love of color in her computer software to create lovely sound and performance environments. You will always find her hacking toys or antiques she found at flea markets and turning them into computer friendly machines that act as the tools used to explore musical expression and composition.  At Eyebeam she's working with Carrie Mae Rose on physical computing experiments for the interactive costumes Wearable Weapons.

Eyebeam CV
2011FIntern
S
 
Hours: 
6PM–9PM
Cost: 
THIS CLASS IS AT CAPACITY
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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THIS WORKSHOP IS BEING HELD AGAIN FALL 2011 AT EYEBEAM. GO HERE FOR INFORMATION: http://www.eyebeam.org/events/beyond-the-joystick-introduction-to-alternative-physical-interfaces-0

 

This workshop led by Eyebeam Fellow Kaho Abe is for artists, designers and hobbyists interested in starting to think about and explore alternative physical interfaces that can be used in games, toys or interactive art projects.

This workshop series is sold out: Please join our email list to find out when we will offer the next one.

 
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A ticket for a trip is an object that gives you exclusive access to an unexplored place.  It is a mere piece of paper, but it carries imagination and anticipation of the future, of what new world it can unlock. The Ticket Machine is a Rube Goldberg type collaborative installation which is triggered with a drop of a coin. The machine then unveils different worlds, created by the collaborators, and finally produces a printed ticket. This installation was created during the Eyebeam Roadshow 2010 at 01SJ in San Jose. Collaborators include: James Stone, Randy Sarafan

Project Created: 
September 2010
 
People: james stone, Randy Sarafan, Kaho Abe
Project Type: Installation
Tags: Ticket Machine, roadshow, physical computing, collaboration, arduino
Partner Organizations:

Late Tuesday, a group of signatories including Wired magazine editor and DIY Drones' Chris Anderson, Phil Torrone of Make magazine, David Mellis of MIT Media Lab and Arduino, Limor Fried of Adafruit, and Ayah Bdeir of New York's Eyebeam publicly issued a formal definition of open-source hardware.

The basic elements of the standards are as follows: documentation; necessary software; derived works; free redistribution; attribution; no discrimination against persons or groups; no discrimination against fields of endeavor; distribution of license; license must not be specific to a product; license must not restrict other hardware or software; and license must be technology-neutral.

That is a definition that might be considered familiar to many who have read much about free-software licensing.

 

A couple of us from MAKE attended an inspirational meeting on Wednesday at Eyebeam in NYC with the most influential people in open source hardware including Limor Fried, Bunnie Huang (Chumby), and the Arduino team.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Once upon a time being alone meant you were unable to play a decent game of rock-paper-scissors, but now you can finally amuse yourself with just your own hand.

 
Book Details
Format: 
Paperback, 128 pages
Publication Date: 
March 2009
ISBN: 
978-1600610837
Category: 
Design
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

High fashion goes digital with Diana Eng! In Fashion Geek, Diana pioneers an emerging generation of tech savvy women crafters (or would-be crafters) who demand stylish yet practical designs that are chemically charged. Now you can take simple, girly items such as a hoodie or scarf and transform them into must-have techno-accessories through approachable, step-by-step directions. Full-color photos make it easy to see how every project comes to life.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

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The Brushduino Steve writes -

 
Tags: arduino
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