Virtual Reality

Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Cicatrix, Charred Bodies: Pain and Redemption in Virtual and Real Worlds opens at the Eyebeam Window Gallery on November 29th. "Cicatrix" refers to scar tissue, and for his installation Eyebeam Resident Alan Sondheim juxtaposes early radio equipment with contemporary models of virtual avatars to meditate on virtuality as it relates to distortion, pain, and death. In a reflection on the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, Alan comments how in Second Life pain physically cannot occur, but therefore it also cannot be stopped. The avatars he creates, both through digital texture mapping and 3D printing, capture distorted bodies in moments of unnatural pain. The elements of distortion in Alan's work are aural, too: several antique crystal radio sets will be amplified so they can be heard through the glass in the Window Gallery. Cicatrix, Charred Bodies will be on view in the window gallery until December 11th.

 
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Kazuhiko Hachiya’s Inter Dis-Communication Machine, composed of a video camera, transmitters, head mounted displays, batteries, and feathers is a communication system aimed at transmitting and receiving sensual experiences.

Used by two people wearing head-mounted displays, the ‘machine’ projects one wearer’s sight and sound perception of the environment into the other one’s display, thus confusing the borders between the identities of ‘you’ and ‘me’.

The Inter Dis-Communication Machine allows its wearers to ‘enter’ each other’s body and perception without being able to influence it.  This work was exhibited as part of the Prix Selection exhibition at Eyebeam Atelier.

 

Project Created: 
March 2004
 
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Myron Krueger is a pioneer of virtual reality and interactive art. Beginning in 1969, Krueger developed the prototypes for what would eventually be called Virtual Reality. These "responsive environments" responded to the movement and gesture of the viewer through an elaborate system of sensing floors, graphic tables, and video cameras. Audience members could directly interact with the video projections of others interacted with a shared environment. Krueger also pioneered the development of unencumbered, full-body participation in computer-created telecommunication experiences and coined the term "Artificial Reality" in 1973 to describe the ultimate expression of this concept.

Eyebeam CV
2004F
SExhibiting Artist
 
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Luc Courchesne took part in the emergence of media arts twenty-five years ago, when, as a video artist inspired by a generation of experimental filmmakers including Michael Snow and Hollis Frampton, he adopted computer technologies. First delving into interactive portraiture, a great artistic tradition re-articulated in a new mould, his work has recently turned to another important genre, that of landscape. With his installations, "panoscopic" images, and a device of his own making used to create a sense of visual immersion, he transforms the spectator into a visitor whom he leads, like Alice, through the looking glass.

Eyebeam CV
2004FExhibiting Artist
SExhibiting Artist
 
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