action

We thought: culture is much more important than politics. Let’s just start getting people living the way they wanna live.

You wanna live in a world where you don’t have to work? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a world where you can get food for free? Let’s make it.

You wanna live in a house with lots of women and men and live the way you want? Let’s do it.

Let’s make the world that you imagine real by acting it out.

And if you can act it out, it’s real.

– Peter Coyote on The Diggers

From a PBS documentary on The Diggers.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

Italy's Berlusconi regime, already known around the world as an enemy of
free speech and popular access to the tools of communication, has now
floated a proposal to require Italians to get an "uploader's license" in order
to put any "moving pictures" on the Internet. The government claims that
this is required as part of the EU's product placement disclosure rules, which
is about as ridiculous assertion as I've heard this month.


"The decree subjects the transmission of images on the Web to rules typical of television and requires prior ministerial authorization, with an incredible limitation on the way the Internet currently functions," opposition Democratic Party lawmaker Paolo Gentiloni told the press conference.

Article 4 of the decree specifies that the dissemination over the Internet "of moving pictures, whether or not accompanied by sound," requires ministerial authorization.

 
Book Details
Format: 
paperback, 240 pages
Publication Date: 
October 2009
ISBN: 
9780262513050
Category: 
History
In Stock: 
yes

Situation—a unique set of conditions produced in both space and time and ranging across material, social, political, and economic relations—has become a key concept in twenty-first-century art. Rooted in artistic practices of the 1960s and 1970s, the idea of situation has evolved and transcended these in the current context of globalization. This anthology offers key writings on areas of art practice and theory related to situation, including notions of the site specific, the artist as ethnographer or fieldworker, the relation between action and public space, the meaning of place and locality, and the crucial role of the curator in recent situation specific art.

 
People: Claire Doherty
Tags: Space, site, action

an article on protests in response to the pending Cap and Trade Bill.
Uh, what’s wrong with this picture?

This was the first of a series of about 20 rallies planned for Southern and oil-producing states to organize resistance to proposed legislation that would set a limit on emissions of heat-trapping gases, requiring many companies to buy emission permits. Participants described the system as an energy tax that would undermine the economy of Houston, the nation’s energy capital.

and a few paragraphs down:

 

…from an article in the NY Times today about a pro-oil, anti Cap n Trade Bill rally in Houston :

A public relations company hired by a pro-coal industry group, the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity, recently sent at least 58 fake letters opposing new climate laws to members of Congress. The letters, forged by the public relations company Bonner & Associates, purported to be from groups like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Hispanic organizations.

Bonner & Associates has acknowledged the forgeries, blaming them on a temporary employee who was subsequently fired. The coal coalition has apologized for the fake letters and said it was cooperating with an investigation of the matter by a Congressional committee.

 

Dear  President Obama,

I just finished reading Elizabeth Kolbert’s article in June 29 2009 issue of The New Yorker called “The Catastrophist,” a profile of climatologist James Hansen.

I have thought many times about how to compose any kind of letter that would at least have meaning to me, if not to the administration, but time has run out for pondering.

I am an artist and animator, and I work with issues of climate change (http://www.o-matic.com).
I have had more conversations than I care to remember about how it’s almost too late, how it is too late,  how it is futile and hopeless because of big business and lobby resistance. But time has also run out for conversations, and people like me need to DEMAND a message from you and a commitment to action.

 
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