physical computing

Hours: 
6:30PM - 9PM
Cost: 
$250 for 6 workshop sessions
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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This workshop series led by Eyebeam Fellow Kaho Abe is for artists, designers and hobbyists interested in starting to think about and explore alternative physical interfaces that can be used in games, toys or interactive art projects.

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Projects: Beyond the Joystick
People: Kaho Abe
Research: Game Design
Tags: games, physical computing, workshops
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Kate Watkins has an eye for the unique and beautiful. She has a background in painting and graphic design but fled to NY to pursue a MFA in Design + Technology at Parsons The New School for Design. She combines her eye for detail and love of color in her computer software to create lovely sound and performance environments. You will always find her hacking toys or antiques she found at flea markets and turning them into computer friendly machines that act as the tools used to explore musical expression and composition.  At Eyebeam she's working with Carrie Mae Rose on physical computing experiments for the interactive costumes Wearable Weapons.

Eyebeam CV
2011FIntern
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Hours: 
6PM–9PM
Cost: 
THIS CLASS IS AT CAPACITY
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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THIS WORKSHOP IS BEING HELD AGAIN FALL 2011 AT EYEBEAM. GO HERE FOR INFORMATION: http://www.eyebeam.org/events/beyond-the-joystick-introduction-to-alternative-physical-interfaces-0

 

This workshop led by Eyebeam Fellow Kaho Abe is for artists, designers and hobbyists interested in starting to think about and explore alternative physical interfaces that can be used in games, toys or interactive art projects.

This workshop series is sold out: Please join our email list to find out when we will offer the next one.

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I recently needed an obnoxiously large push button for the Ninja Shadow Warrior game cabinet. I have been working on making the cabinet whimsical by adding oversized elements to it. I found a 5 dollar pack of 2 lights at Home Depot and took them apart. I then opened it and did the following: I replaced the on-off switch inside the light with a momentary snap switch that is normally open and glued it down. I rewired the snap switch with the usual “button circuit” –  a 10k resistor, ground, voltage, and a wire to pin2 on the Arduino. I rewired the light bulb so that the Arduino can control it from pin8, via reed relay. I mounted it on to the game cabinet I used the digital Button code example and now I have an obnoxiously large push button made cheaply. I separated the light from the switch part so that the game can flash the button light whenever it wants to bring attention to the push button, even if it hasn’t been pushed yet.

 

http://www.eyebeam.org/events/beyond-the-joystick-introduction-to-altern... I am running this workshop series weekly on Tuesday Evenings for 6 weeks, starting on June 28 to Aug 2 at Eyebeam. It’s basically for artists, designers and hobbyists interested in starting to think about and explore alternative physical interfaces that can be used in games, toys or interactive art projects. We’ll be learning about using the Arduino and some Processing with various sensors and switches to make simple, but effective controllers. This area is a big part of my practice so I am really excited about sharing it!

 

I am feeling a great amount of social responsibility while doing simple tasks like buying urls and testing regulators. Think it's time for a walk by the river.

http://www.signalstrengthproject.com

 

 
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Signal Strength is a project to advance mobile democracy. It consists of modules for ad-hoc social networking that let people in an urban area interact offline, leveraging their mobile phones for untraceable communications.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 

I will be showing Hit Me! at the next Eyebeam Mixer. I am really excited about it. I need to do some updating to the game. Here is a list of intended updates: 1. Better wireless pin-hole cameras. For the game, I need 2 cameras that are same but run on different channels. I found some rechargeable ones at Geeks that have a choice of 4 different channels around the 2.4 Ghz frequency. Unfortunately I won’t know how the system would run in a space until I actually try it out. There are always going to be things that run on the 2.4 Ghz range, as well as the 900 Mhz range that my older cameras ran on. In the Chelsea Museum show, the old cameras conflicted with the project that was running right before mine, but it worked fine as soon as the previous project was turned off. So I am looking forward to getting them quick to try out in the space. 2. Better doorbell system. For the game, I need 2 that run on different channels like the cameras, but they can share the same receiver.

 
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Hit Me! is a two-player hyper-interactive, physical game that tests speed, agility and the ability to take good snapshots. Utilizing wireless technology and incorporating the concept of the metagame, Hit Me! encourages face-to-face real-world interactions, not only by the players but also by the spectators.

The object of the game is to hit the opponent's button on top of the head. Once a hit is made, the hitter's camera takes a snapshot of the victim. The hitter receives a point for the hit, and up to 2 additional points can be awarded by the Judge based on the quality of the snapshot. The snapshots, points and times are projected on a wall for spectators to observe.

Project Created: 
March 2011
 
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