media

Beatriz da Costa's anti-cancer work in progress, called "The Life Garden," is currently on display at Eyebeam in Manhattan.

 

Imagine Bach's first Cello Suite as a series of white dots circling and plucking white lines. Now watch it.

Using the math behind string length and pitch, the visualization represents each note as a string to help people understand better "music's underlying structure and subtle shifts," according to creator Alexander Chen.

The visualization is the first piece produced by Baroque.me, created by Google employee Chen as a part of his residency at Eyebeam

 
Projects: Data Visualization
Tags: Alex Chen, Huffington Post, Press, media, Data Visualization

The Society for Environmental Graphic Design brought together technology, design and interaction experts, as well as 200 attendees passionate about design, to discuss how location-based technologies are transforming our experience of physical spaces and to explore what lies ahead.

 

"Money is one of the most intimate things there is. I might give you the contents of my wallet, but I won't give you access to my bank account."

Meet Fran Ilich, a media artist and activist who started his own investment bank six years ago with nothing more than server space. On the eve of Bank Transfer Day, he sits with me in the dimly lit kitchen of Eyebeam Art and Technology Center where he is a fellow, to discuss the Spacebank and how he ended up at Occupy Wall Street.
Submit this story

"Money is one of the most intimate things there is. I might give you the contents of my wallet, but I won't give you access to my bank account."

Meet Fran Ilich, a media artist and activist who started his own investment bank six years ago with nothing more than server space. On the eve of Bank Transfer Day, he sits with me in the dimly lit kitchen of Eyebeam Art and Technology Center where he is a fellow, to discuss the Spacebank and how he ended up at Occupy Wall Street.

 

Thinking about anti-social media 2.0... perhaps an installation about or re: recent deaths, future death, hidden in Eyebeam superstructure? performers hiding out in building, performing only after-hours? leaving small images/debris/residuals/artifacts in corners (each corner trihedral reflections of selves interrupted), momentary gestures, peripheral, almost invisible, after hosted events, strange rooftop images visible from space only, everything unwired, locative in the sense of substance, scattered debris for example, as if something had happened, an accident, rumors spread only by word of mouth, nothing electronic, the street knows... 

something to this, residencies for examples, residence, where's your residence, I live at such-and-such an address...

 
People: Alan Sondheim
Tags: media, social

NEW YORK— The New York City art elite may be unaware of a cultural phenomenon boiling right under their noses: "Silicon Alley" (as opposed to the West Coast's Silicon Valley) is the going name for New York's burgeoning technology community, a combination of home-office programmers, start-up businesses, venture capitalists, and cheerleading groupies who have given rise to such Internet giants as Foursquare and Tumblr. But a little bit of Silicon Alley made its way to Chelsea last weekend with an Art Hack Weekend hosted jointly by new media space Eyebeam and The Creators Project.

 

Dead Drops in NYC—A Video How-To
Tuesday January 25, 2011
IMG_0421-650x433

As part of his EYEBEAM residency in NYC, Aram Bartholl created "Dead Drops," an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space where USB flash drives are embedded into walls, buildings and curbs accessable to anybody in public space.

This is an interesting project that is the intersection of street art and technology, using public space as a way to communicate in a specific way with others.

 

NYConvergence.com

Digital Media Technology in the New York/New Jersey/Connecticut Tri-State Area

Artists Begin Using Data to Track Rents, Audience Satisfaction
July 5, 2011 at 3:01 pm
Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology in Chelsea

Image via Wikipedia

Artists have been increasing their focus on data, to do everything from track the rent a performing-arts group pays for space to the satisfaction levels of audience members. A recent panel at the Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in Chelsea, discussed the appealing nature of the data and how it can help arts groups market, build communities and increase their advocacy efforts. While first entering data can be a daunting task, the experts encouraged artists to stick with it in order to experience the benefits, including negotiating lower rents and growing their audiences.

 

PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Wednesday, June 22, 2011
The massive exhibition showcases the works of artists with a connection to region.
With more than 60 artists and five locations, the latest Pittsburgh Biennial is an elephant. And, as the old saying goes, "How do you eat an elephant? ... A chunk at a time!'

The halls and staircase are filled with art, too. A mural titled "Katabasis" by Chris Kardambikis of San Diego, Calif., on the first floor illustrates multiple worlds the artist has imagined as existing in and around our own. Pittsburgh artist Jacob Ciocci has filled the staircase with a mixed-media installation that is a distillation of images that can be found on the Internet -- still and moving.

 
Syndicate content