surveillance

Venue: 
NYU-Polytechnic School of Engineering
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Join us for two days of speakers, panels and workshops designed to introduce the community to DIY networking. Learn how to create your own offline networks, portable web servers, mesh networks or internet gateways in hands on workshops. Attend panels where you can discuss your visions for how a localized network could support your school, your community, or your cause. Listen to speakers talk about the future of computer networks and why it’s important to understand how networks work in this age of hyper-connectivity.

The conference will be organized around the following questions and themes:

 
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A Quiet Disposition is an online intelligence-gathering system which trawls the web for information about unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or 'drones'), and analyses what it finds to produce new connections. The full database is available at aquietdisposition.com, and as of December 2014 it contained some 28k people, 35k documents, and 83k semantic terms connected with drone programmes. 
A Quiet Disposition was created in part during a residency at Eyebeam in collaboration with The White Building in London.

Project Created: 
January 2015
 
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This field guide to network infrastructure in New York City shows you how to identify the cables, cameras, sensors, and networks of fiber and power that increasingly shape the urban environment. 

Project Created: 
January 2015
 
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Photo by Christine Butler

Many applications and governments can listen in on general conversation by accessing smartphone microphones. This microphone jammer creates ultrasonic noise at 24KHz, overwhelming smart phone microphones, but still allowing data access and SMS/GSM. The jammer must be within a couple inches of the microphone. 

Project Created: 
January 2015
 

NEW WORK: Eternal Portraits

Facebook uses face recognition software to identify its users in photos. This works via a ‘template’ of your facial features that is created from your profile images. These features — the distance between your eyes, the symmetry of your mouth — generally do not change over time. Unlike a photograph, which captures some ephemeral expression of who you are at a particular moment, a face recognition template forever remains your portrait.

 

Eyebeam_simplified_logo

 

PRISM Break Up
October 3-6, 2013
Eyebeam
New York, NY

Request for Proposals
DEADLINE: MIDNIGHT August 25

On October 3-6, 2013, Eyebeam Art and Technology Center will host the first event of its kind PRISM Break Up, a series of art and technology events dedicated to exploring and providing forms of protection from overreaching surveillance. The gathering will bring together a wide spectrum of artists, hackers, academics, activists, security analysts and journalists for a long weekend of meaningful conversation, hands-on workshops and art installations.

Why does it matter?

 

Come by QF gallery tomorrow evening for my closing party!

Details:

QF Gallery 
98 Newtown Lane
East Hampton, NY 11937

Saturday, July 20
gallery opens at noon
closing reception 6-8pm

 
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"Dark Side of the Prism" is a Firefox Add-on that provides a soundtrack for our surveilled internet meanderings.

The public recently learned that the US National Security Agency's on-going internet surveillance program, Prism, collects data from users of major websites. Many of us already know that any data we might share-- not just Facebook posts, but our search and click pathways and histories-- could be compromised, but we do so anyway. We have normalized this ubiquitous surveillance.

"Dark Side of the Prism" uses Pink Floyd's aural prism (Dark Side of the Moon) as a playlist to the NSA's tracking efforts, serving as an auditory reminder of how our online activities are surveilled. What hypochondriac questions do you Google in the middle of the night; who do you cyberstalk? Consider those missives the lyrical component to our soundtrack. 

Project Created: 
July 2013
 

This is the first in a series of technical posts I hope to put together over the coming weeks about the process of creating Stranger Visions. Starting from the lab end I will describe in detail how I create these portraits from DNA.

The first step of course is extracting DNA from a sample, that can be done with a kit readily obtainable from Qiagen, the “DNA Investigator Kit”.

 

Kari Mulholland over at TED made a short behind-the-scenes documentary about Stranger visions, check it out!

 
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